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  #27221  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 5:46 PM
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The seller of this postcard dates it as circa 1960. That seems reasonable as the Sky Terrace Motel at 1925 W Washington Boulevard appears to have been built in 1959.



eBay

The front of the building is still recognizable, even if the sides are now partially hidden by trees. I couldn't find many references to Crossroads Village, but it does appear on a list of affordable housing.


GSV
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  #27222  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 5:47 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
The seller didn't give a date with this postcard of the Wilshire Terrace condos at 10375 Wilshire Boulevard, but they look pretty new. There are a few articles about the building on la.curbed.com including 'How the 1958 Wilshire Terrace Building Got Its SoCal Glamor', which comes complete floorplans and diagrams.


eBay
I think the Wilshire Terrace fire has been covered on the thread, but the search function won't cough anything up. LAFD's biggest fire ever and still talked about around here. Glowing embers rained down on our house and neighborhood (I lived south of Santa Monica Blvd), leaving scorch marks but not setting anything alight (some folks living between Wilshire and Santa Monica Blvds were not so lucky). The next morning I saw hundreds of fire trucks parked diagonally on both sides of Wilshire near the disaster. A spectacular sight, glinting in the sun.

The LAT reports are here.

No one seemed to much like the decorative orange-tile squares on the Wilshire Terrace balconies, but when they weren't restored, it left the building looking oddly anonymous.

Last edited by tovangar2; Mar 26, 2015 at 6:30 PM.
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  #27223  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:12 PM
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I really like your before and after of the Sky Terrace Motel HossC. -so glad to see the triple diamonds have survived.
_


'mystery' location.


eBay 10-20-2014

I wish I had more information to go on. If I remember correctly the seller only had this vague description. -Los Angeles area Transit. Two streetcars
__

Thanks everyone for the follow-ups on my Hollywood Freeway & Alvarado Street Bus Stop photo.
Now I understand the lane situation after viewing HossC's aerial, and the photograph below.


gsv

Odd that I never noticed that bus lane. Maybe it's because I thought it was a lane to get back on the freeway if you accidentally took the wrong exit,
and I never gave it a second thought.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 26, 2015 at 6:25 PM.
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  #27224  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:29 PM
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I recently found this interesting postcard on eBay.




I searched the thread for "Dudley", but only two posts came up, both about the "Dudley-Do-Right Emporium" on Sunset Blvd.

Does anyone know where the Dudley Building stood in Santa Monica?

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 26, 2015 at 7:21 PM.
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  #27225  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wig-Wag View Post
ER, the building that currently most closely matches the building in the background of the Rose Parade shot is the Pottery Barn building at the corner of Colorado and Raymond. However, it appears to have lost it's upper story and undergone severe remodeling. More importantly, the half union streetcar tracks in the foreground are going the wrong way for what is a traditional west to east parade direction. I am still researching as PE had four half unions on Colorado Boulevard along the parade route. They were from west to east, Fair oaks Ave., Raymond Ave., Los Robles and South Lake Avenue. See this wiki site for an explanation of streetcar Half, Three Quarter and Gran unions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_union

Cheers,
Jack
Thanks Wig-Wag!


Is this the building you mentioned Jack? I think it's a pretty good match, except for the missing second floor.


GSV

(the street and crosswalks reminds me of the British Flag)


Here is the original photograph again

eBay
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  #27226  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:49 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Dudley Building/Merchants National Bank

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Does anyone know where the Dudley Building stood in Santa Monica?

__
No, but it was apparently famous enough at the time, it didn't need an address:


sunset

Thomas Horace Dudley, a Leicester man, was a director and/or president of three banks, the Bank of Venice, the Ocean Park and Merchants National, and a one-time mayor of Santa Monica.

A tiny whiff of noir re the mayor here


men of the pacific coast

More info here.





P.S. Mystery solved. Thx HossC and ProphetM

Last edited by tovangar2; Mar 26, 2015 at 10:18 PM.
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  #27227  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 6:54 PM
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This is interesting t2. (I guess we have a bit of a mystery on our hands. )

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  #27228  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 7:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Thanks everyone for the follow-ups on my Hollywood Freeway & Alvarado Street Bus Stop photo.
Now I understand the lane situation after viewing HossC's aerial, and the photograph below.


gsv

Odd that I never noticed that bus lane. Maybe it's because I thought it was a lane to get back on the freeway if you accidentally took the wrong exit,
and I never gave it a second thought.
__
Can't let the discussion of the Alvarado St/Hollywood Fwy bus stop go by without commenting on the columned house in the picture above...and pointing out a certain prior post of yours, ER: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17514

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  #27229  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 7:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

Does anyone know where the Dudley Building stood in Santa Monica?
I found the Dudley Building and Merchants National Bank in the 1917 Santa Monica City Directory (they're probably in many other CDs too). Both addresses point to the same location.


LAPL

And this is what you'll find at the north-west corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and 3rd Street today.


GSV
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  #27230  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 7:38 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
The Wilshire-Fairfax "Rogers/DeMille Field" appears to be clearly marked, but I wonder about the field depicted under "Sherman." Unless it is the Fairfax-Melrose location ( http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=8683 ) Its existence lends credence to stories about certain '20s and early '30s residents conveniently flying in and out of the area ([I]in airplanes[/I]). Don't see any obvious airstrip evidence in recent area photos - yet.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Wig-Wag View Post



BifRayRock, This map from the Lost and Forgotten airfields site shows an airfield under the number 4 that the key describes as Pacific Air Transport.

http://www.airfields-freeman.com/CA/...ds_CA_LA_C.htm

A brief history of the company appears on this Wikipedia page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Air_Transport

Unfortunately, the Los Angeles County Airports map is not clear enough to read the street name, but the location seems to jive with what is shown on the map you posted.

Cheers,
Jack
On the maps, I think the "aviation fields" marked on the "Sherman" map are the numbers "3" and "1" marked on the "Lost & Forgotten airfields" map. Number 1 is marked as "Rogers" which was at Fairfax and Wilshire, and so directly north of that would be #3, listed as Lincoln Airlines. The road to the right of them, not named on the Sherman map, would be Fairfax (it was originally called Crescent and I don't know when the name changed). I don't know why the area is called "Lincoln Airlines" on the map, but the photos below have the area designated as "Mercury Aviation Field" which is not listed on the map. (Perhaps Lincoln Airlines flew out of Mercury Aviation Field.)

DWP - LA Public Library Image Archive

(1920's) - View of the original Mercury Aviation Field located on the southwest corner of Fairfax Avenue and Melrose Avenue, across the street from where Fairfax High School stands today.

USC Digital Library

(1920s) - Aerial view of the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue looking north during an aviation fair. Automobiles are parked off the roads at the fringes of the open fields that skirt them. Oil fields are visible along with mountains in the background, while at center, people crowd around a collection of airplanes that are situated next to small vendor booths. In a field in the left background, a building shows a sign which reads "Mercury Aviation Company".

Historical Notes

Cecil B. DeMille founded the Mercury Aviation Company (aka Mercury Air Lines ) in 1919. Mercury was the first American airlines to carry air freight and passengers commercially on regularly scheduled runs. It scheduled service to Santa Catalina Island and San Diego, later San Francisco, with Junker-Larsen JL-6 monoplanes. Inaugurated five months before KLM began operations in Europe. (Aerofiles - US Aviation Firsts)

LA Public Library Image Archive

(1927) - Aerial view looking southeast of Fairfax High School located on the southeast corner of Fairfax and Melrose Avenues. Mercury Aviation Airfield occupied the land in the lower-right of photo in the early 1920s. (see above photo).
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  #27231  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 8:19 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
I found the Dudley Building and Merchants National Bank in the 1917 Santa Monica City Directory (they're probably in many other CDs too). Both addresses point to the same location.


LAPL
Well done! Do you happen to know if the Dudley was one of the Santa Monica buildings lost in the '94 quake?



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Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Thx. Really nice photo
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  #27232  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 8:51 PM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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Regarding the Dudley Building...

From the Santa Monica Evening Outlook, 7/9/25:


http://digital.smpl.org/cdm/compound...208/show/20192


http://digital.smpl.org/cdm/compound...208/show/20192

So then was the building that stands there today (and so helpfully posted by HossC) once a part of the Bay Cities Guaranty Building that stands next door? That one was the first skyscraper in Santa Monica, Built in 1929.
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  #27233  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 9:26 PM
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Good find ProphetM!


Believe it or not, I've been looking for this not-so-beautiful church the better part of the afternoon.


GSV



You see, I found this R.R. derailment photo in one of my old files and I've been trying to find the location.


my collection

I surmised it might be in the N. Figueroa vicinity because it was grouped with some other photos from that same area.

I wasn't too far off. It appears the B&W photograph was taken from Pasadena Ave. and the Church is located on an odd little stretch of Marion Way.

Here's the same view in 2014

GSV

Today, the rail line is below-grade at this point, then proceeds underground beneath the large intersection of N. Figueroa, Pasadena Ave. and Marmion Way. (see below)


blue=church / red=derailment

google_earth


Also, the old house to the right of the church that appears in the b&w photograph is still there as well. (looking rather bleak)


GSV

So now my question is:
Do any of you rail-fans know about this derailment? Is this why it was decided to put the rail-line below grade?

By the looks of the b&w photograph, I'd say the accident happened in the late-1970s.

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 26, 2015 at 10:18 PM.
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  #27234  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 9:36 PM
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Hay fields....and water

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

USC Digital Library

(1920s) - Aerial view of the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue looking north during an aviation fair. Automobiles are parked off the roads at the fringes of the open fields that skirt them. Oil fields are visible along with mountains in the background, while at center, people crowd around a collection of airplanes that are situated next to small vendor booths. In a field in the left background, a building shows a sign which reads "Mercury Aviation Company".


Notice the hay fields at the right in the photo above..

World's largest haymarket was located in Clearwater-Hynes.
That city is now known as Paramount.

It was known as Clearwater because of the many gushing water-wells. They still flow today in 2015.

Paramount is the home of the Zamboni Factory where they make the famous Ice Resurfacer Machine. Photos below...



Pacific Electric

On a different note:

Zamboni - made in Paramount, CA [formerly Clearwater]

wikimedia

One of the first Zamboni machines. They were originally built on a WWII surplus Jeeps...1949

https://www.flickr.com/photos/andyboohh/4010282911/

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Mar 26, 2015 at 10:07 PM.
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  #27235  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 9:43 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProphetM View Post

So then was the building that stands there today (and so helpfully posted by HossC) once a part of the Bay Cities Guaranty Building that stands next door? That one was the first skyscraper in Santa Monica, Built in 1929.
Do you mean the Clocktower Building?

loopnet

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Believe it or not, I've been looking for this not-so-beautiful church the better part of the afternoon.
__
I'm curious as to why the tower got beanstalked (?)



pix from e_r's last post

Great post CBD. Hay and Zambonis, who da thunk it? Memorable.

Last edited by tovangar2; Mar 26, 2015 at 10:14 PM.
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  #27236  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 10:11 PM
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Yes, the Clock Tower Building was originally the Bay Cities Guaranty Building Loan Association Building (if that's not too many "buildings"!).


------------


Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post


my collection

So now my question is:
Do any of you rail-fans know about this derailment? Is this why it was decided to put the rail-line below grade?

By the looks of the b&w photograph, I'd say the accident happened in the mid-1970s.
I remembered seeing photos of a derailment in this area the other day when I was looking for pictures of the Marmion Hotel - it just took me a while to remember where I saw them. The picture above is from the Herald-Examiner Collection at LAPL (http://jpg1.lapl.org/00096/00096099.jpg). The photographer was Mike Sergieff, and the summary says "A train derailed along Figueroa Street and Marmion Way in Highland Park, closing the roads in both directions. The cargo ranged from automobiles to corn sweeteners. Photograph dated March 24, 1983."

It looks like 1983 was a bad year for this line. The Paul Chinn photograph below, also from the Herald-Examiner Collection, has this caption: "Train accident a rail mystery: A Los Angeles City firefighter surveys damages from a freight train derailment in the Highland Park area. No injuries were reported, but five of the 57 cars were tipped over and four cars were tilted, but still on the track. What caused the derailment near the end of the train's trip from Chicago to Los Angeles is unknown. The derailed cars hit a telephone pole and downed some power lines in the accident at Marmion Way near Avenue 43, city fire spokesman Henry Amparan said. Santa Fe railroad spokesman Gene Flohrschutz said passenger trains would continue to run through San Bernardino, Riverside, Fullerton and Los Angeles, and the freight route would reopen today." Photograph dated: Aug. 15, 1983.


LAPL
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  #27237  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 10:11 PM
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This is a very unique little novelty card (1910s? 1920s?)

It feature a mailman, and in his pouch are little photos of Los Angeles.


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Postcard-Los...item234d8a931e


http://www.ebay.com/itm/Postcard-Los...item234d8a931e

It has 2 hours left on bidding. -there are no bids. starting bid is only $3.50
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Postcard-Los...item234d8a931e

my birthday is July 4th.

__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Mar 26, 2015 at 10:21 PM.
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  #27238  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 10:15 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
I think the Wilshire Terrace fire has been covered on the thread, but the search function won't cough anything up. LAFD's biggest fire ever and still talked about around here. Glowing embers rained down on our house and neighborhood (I lived south of Santa Monica Blvd), leaving scorch marks but not setting anything alight (some folks living between Wilshire and Santa Monica Blvds were not so lucky). The next morning I saw hundreds of fire trucks parked diagonally on both sides of Wilshire near the disaster. A spectacular sight, glinting in the sun.

The LAT reports are here.
You reminded me of another fire that I personally witnessed. LAFD had their hands full with this one, too.

Besides L.A. Times articles, the following links were used for information for this post. The first link has details about almost every aspect of the fire in separate page links.

http://www.iklimnet.com/hotelfires/interstatebank.html
http://blogdowntown.com/2009/09/4647...t-on-big-fires
______________________

THE FIRST INTERSTATE BANK BUILDING FIRE

On May 4, 1988, a friend and I went to see a film at the Vagabond Theatre, which showed classic and revival films at the time, on Wilshire Blvd., located just adjacent to MacArthur Park. [We went to see the film Some Came Running, with Shirley MacLaine, Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin.] Upon exiting, sometime around 11:00 p.m., we looked toward downtown and, on an otherwise clear night, we saw what looked to be smoke coming from one of the skyscrapers. Since we were so close to downtown we decided to drive down Wilshire toward this sight. If I recall, there was very little traffic that night and when we turned a corner we were shocked to see this occurring:

LAFD

This was the First Interstate Bank building, the tallest building in Los Angeles, at the time, and West of the Mississippi. It was built in 1973, opened in 1974, as the UCB, or United California Bank building and known as such until 1981, when United California Bank changed its name to First Interstate Bank. The tower was renamed 707 Wilshire Tower in 1996 and became Aon Center in 2003. It is located at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Hope Street in downtown Los Angeles. (The building was built one year before it was mandatory to have sprinklers in Los Angeles' high-rise buildings.)

This building is 62 stories high.

So, what happened?

It's a tragic and unfortunate, but fascinating story.

Oddly enough, at the time of the fire, an automatic sprinkler system was being installed in the building. This sprinkler system had been installed in 90 percent of the building, including on the fire floors. On this night, May 4, 1988, at about 10:20 p.m., the water valves controlling the systems were closed by the sprinkler contractor, to await the installation of water-flow alarms. (!)

THREE MINUTES LATER employees of the sprinkler system contractor heard glass falling and saw light smoke at the ceiling level on the 5th floor. A manual alarm was pulled but sounded for only a few seconds. It is believed that the alarm was silenced by security personnel on the ground floor. At 10:30 p.m. a smoke detector on the 12th floor was activated and was reset by security personnel. At 10:32, three additional smoke detectors on the 12th floor were activated and were again reset by security personnel. At 10:34, four smoke detectors on the 12th floor were activated and reset.

What was happening is that a fire had originated in an open-plan office area in the southeast quadrant of the 12th floor. The area of origin contained modular office furniture with numerous personal computers and terminals used by securities trading personnel. The cause is thought to be electrical in origin, but the precise source of ignition was not determined. The fire extended to the entire open area of the floor and several office enclosures to fully involve the 12th floor, except for the passenger elevator lobby, which was protected by automatic closing fire doors.

Apparently, the security people inside the building thought the shutting down of the sprinkler system had somehow caused the alarms to go off, despite the occurrences witnessed on the fifth floor. Meanwhile, witnesses outside of the building could see smoke coming from the 12th floor. At 10:36 multiple smoke detector alarms from the 12th to 30th floors activated. At this point Alexander Handy, a 24-year-old building maintenance engineer rode an elevator up to investigate what he thought was a false alarm, but a fire door was blocked when he got there. The elevator had no safety interlock or control logic to prevent him from entering the elevator and it allowed the elevator to park and open on a floor with a fire. Firefighters found his body in the freight elevator on the 12th floor. He was the evening's sole fatality. (A profile of Handy noted that he was married with a 2-year-old daughter, an Air Force veteran, and a native of the San Fernando Valley.)

Meanwhile, at 10:37 p.m., L.A.F.D. was contacted by witnesses outside the tower, reporting a fire on the upper floors. The fire brigade arrived at 10:40 and found that the entire east side and three-fourths of the south side of the 12th floor were fully involved with fire. Unbelievably, at 10:41, the first report of the fire from those inside the building was reported.


Within ten minutes of the fire department's arrival the fire had spread up to the 13th and 14th floors. There was heavy exposure of flames to the windows on successive floors as the fire extended upward from. The flames were estimated to be lapping 30 feet up the face of the building. The curtain walls, including windows, spandrel panels, and mullions, were almost completely destroyed by the fire. There was nothing to stop the exterior vertical spread, and fireground commanders were concerned about the possibility of the fire "lapping" higher to involve additional floors.

Boris Yaro/Los Angeles Times

At 11:10, a half hour after initially arriving, the fire department began to fight the fire.

When I arrived with my friend, around 11:30, or so, none of the side streets around the area had been blocked off and we were within a block of this building. The following photo is a good look at what I remember seeing. (In color, of course.) It was pretty staggering, and frightening and brought to mind the film The Towering Inferno. 9/11 also brought back these images to my mind.


Flames burst from the middle floors of the First Interstate Bank building at the height of the blaze. This view is from Wilshire and Hope Streets. Credit: Boris Yaro / Los Angeles Times

I thought I distinctly remembered seeing smoke coming from a floor way above the 16th floor, where the fire was eventually stopped. I was about to apply this idea to a faulty memory of that until I read this:

Minor fire extension also occurred via poke-through penetrations for electricity and communications, via HVAC shafts, and via heat conduction through the floor slabs. A minor fire occurred in a storeroom on the 27th floor, ignited by fire products escaping from an HVAC shaft that originated on the 12th floor. This fire self-extinguished due to oxygen deficiency, but could have greatly complicated the situation if it had continued to burn. The secondary extensions were minor compared to the perimeter fire spread at the curtain walls.

It's very surreal or strange or whatever might describe the situation when you're witnessing it in person. It's almost unbelievable. This is what I remember seeing, what I remember hearing, though, was a continual rain of glass that was falling from the side of the building. And, oddly, it was a rather beautiful sound amongst the destruction going on. On occasion, other material was falling from the building as well, though I don't know exactly what it was. The following photo was taken the morning after, and look at all the glass at the base of this building that I was hearing as it fell.


The fire started on the 12th floor at around 10:30 p.m. and by 1:30 a.m. the 15th floor was fully engulfed in fire and the 16th floor was beginning to burn. The upward extension was stopped at the 16th floor level, after completely destroying four and one-half floors of the building. At 2:19 a.m. the fire was officially declared as put out.

System failures that occurred on this evening:
--Main fire pumps had been shut down, reducing available water pressure for initial attack.
--Radio communications were overtaxed and disrupted by building's steel frame.
--Fire and water damaged telephone circuits making them unusable.
--Sound-powered emergency phone system in building was ineffective.

Other notes:
--The fire, considered to be the worst high-rise fire in Los Angeles history, destroyed four floors of the 62-story building.
--It took approximately 40% of the Los Angeles City Fire Department to put out this fire, around 300 members. (Imagine a lot of fires caused by an earthquake! You're on your own.)
--One person was killed and 40 were injured.
--Helicopters rescued people from the roof, mostly cleaning crews were in the building, while dropping off firefighters. (It's noted that since 1958, all Los Angeles high-rises have been required to have a large, flat helipad on the roof (it's the only major American city to have that kind of requirement). This is blamed for Los Angeles having a mostly bland skyline. This idea is beginning to change.)

Some eyewitness thoughts:

Jesse: "I was sitting on the steps of the L.A. City Library. Watching and eating some left over peanuts from the Dodger game my brother and I just left. It was incredible to see!"

Bob: "I know of a couple of people that worked in the building AFTER the fire. They say it's haunted with the spirit of the man who was killed when he took the elevator up and opened the door. Now they say you can see him enter the elevator with you some times and leave with you on those floors, and other times if you are working late by yourself, the keyboard will rap like someones typing next to you and the mouse in the next cubicle will move around by itself.

Tim Taylor "I replaced all the curtain wall and glass on the job. I remember we had a few ghost stories also.

A couple other stories pertaining to this building:

--As befitting a building that used to be Los Angeles' tallest, 707 Wilshire has some interesting stories. In 1976 a gunman -- who was later found to have just a starter pistol -- took chief building engineer Martin Hickey as a hostage and led him to the roof. He demanded that a written statement on the dangers of smoking be read on local radio. When it was, he surrendered to the police. The gunman, Dolphin Lair, told KFWB in a jail interview that he had tried to get the word out about smoking after his father's demise. The Times recounts: "They told me it wasn't newsworthy," he said, "So I planned this... and it was newsworthy."

--In 1982 Ron Broyles, an out of work stunt man, climbed the outside of 707 Wilshire. The Times writes that "He was trying to attract attention to himself to get work. As he climbed, a friend on the ground was available for press queries." Broyles made it all the way up the outside of the building with his clamps and rappelling gear, and then was arrested when he reached the roof.
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  #27239  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 10:28 PM
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AMAZING first hand account Martin_Pal! Thanks for this terrific post.

I didn't realize people were rescued from the roof, while dropping off firefighters.
__

Thanks for the follow-up on my derailment photograph HossC.
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  #27240  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2015, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
AMAZING first hand account Martin_Pal! Thanks for this terrific post.

I didn't realize people were rescued from the roof, while dropping off firefighters.
__

Thanks for the follow-up on my derailment photograph HossC.
My Mom worked in that building on the 22nd floor. We watched the fire on TV. I think she had a few days off after the fire. A couple years later the Bank ''retired'' 1,600 people in one day. That was the end of her 10 years at First Interstate.

Last edited by CityBoyDoug; Mar 26, 2015 at 11:02 PM.
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