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  #10481  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:39 AM
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"Consumption cured by Tuberclecide"



ebay

I've been trying to pinpoint the exact location of this fascinating photograph.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 27, 2012 at 4:52 AM.
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  #10482  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:55 AM
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An early view of Hollywood, circa 1905.


ebay

I believe the building with the dome at upper right is Hollywood High School.
I am mostly impressed with the extravagant building at lower right (with it's turret and atrium skylight).
Does anyone know what this building is?
__
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  #10483  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 6:18 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Eastside

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Those two screen grabs from 'Cry Danger' are great FredH. I really like that old 'EASTSIDE Beer' sign
above the doorway in the first sg. I've never heard of that beer before.
__

CHS-USC

Before there was Maier Brewing (Brew 102), there was Maier & Zobelein Brewing. Joe and George went into partnership in 1882. Joe Maier died in 1904 and left his share to his sons. The Maier brothers and George Zobelein got in a fight in 1907 causing Zobelein to leave. He bought 10-year-old Los Angeles Brewing in Lincoln Park (on the opposite side of the LA river from Maier Brewing) and named the new beers he formulated "Eastside". Pabst bought them out in 1953. The brand lasted until 1979.

Jean Harlow christened the first delivery truck to go out after Prohibition ended.


http://www.rustycans.com/COM/month0305.html
Los Angeles Brewery is now artist's lofts.


http://www.rustycans.com/COM/month0305.html
The addition to the original building, now with a Pabst sign.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 17, 2015 at 6:02 PM. Reason: fix links
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  #10484  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 6:35 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Hollywood Center Motel House

.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jul 3, 2015 at 9:02 PM.
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  #10485  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 6:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post
September 7, 1938 - Captioned "Jitterbugs disrupt City Council." If they danced to music, assume there was a band on hand. FDR's portrait looks to be at least four or five feet tall.

lapl
Very cool to see the portrait of Roosevelt on the wall. It immediately made me think of my all-time favorite movie, Chinatown, whose set dressers either did a phenomenal job reproducing the portrait or actually dug the original up from god knows where. Either way it makes me love the movie even more!

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Politicians, ugly buildings and whores all get respectable if they last long enough.
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  #10486  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 7:35 AM
BDiH BDiH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
An early view of Hollywood, circa 1905.


ebay

I believe the building with the dome at upper right is Hollywood High School.
I am mostly impressed with the extravagant building at lower right (with it's turret and atrium skylight).
Does anyone know what this building is?
__
Isn't this building still at the southeast corner of Franklin Avenue and Orange Drive in Hollywood?
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  #10487  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 8:13 AM
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That building is the American Society of Cinematographers clubhouse



http://www.theasc.com/ac_society/index.php



http://www.studiodaily.com/2010/06/a...ted-clubhouse/
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  #10488  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 9:24 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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El Aliso

The Maier Brewing Company has been mentioned again on this thread which reminds me of the 400-year old sycamore that Aliso St was named for and which also used to be such a feature in early LA and, for a short time, of the Maier & Zobelein Brewery.

The tree was 60 feet high and 200 feet wide, making it a dramatic landmark back in the era of single-story buildings.
I came across an 1857 photo of the tree, El Aliso, that I don't think has been posted here before.
It's on the right beyond the Plaza:

LAPL

The tree was east of the ancient Tongva village of Yangna (built on higher ground than the tree), but by 1837 the indigenous population of LA had been reduced dramatically, not least by syphilis and other European diseases, plus bizarrely harsh treatment.

In 1837 Frenchman Jean-Louis Vignes opened a winery under the sycamore, building some one-story frame buildings to house his business (and giving his name to Vignes Street). The El Aliso Winery, named for the tree, became the center of LA's Frenchtown, and shipped 150,000 bottles of wine per year.

El Aliso Winery in 1870 with the tree at its center:

LAPL

El Aliso Winery is shown here between the Plaza and the river:

LAPL Map Collection

Another image of the tree taken in the 1870s. This shot is looking SW over the Macy Street covered bridge. The great crown of the tree may be seen in the distance:

boyleheightshistoryblog

Despite their success, the Vignes family sold out to German immigrants in 1875 who opened the Philadelphia Brewing Company on the site, reusing the frame buildings.

In the 1876 view below, El Aliso may still be seen in the distance, now surrounded by the Philadelphia Brewery:

CC Pierce, USC Library Collection

Seven years later, two more German immigrants, Joseph Maier and George Zobelein (the latter of later Eastside Beer fame) purchased the brewery. They replaced the frame buildings with a huge, multi-storied brick edifice in 1889. The tree, now severely pruned on three sides, remained at the center, providing shade for the wagon yard:

seaver center /nhm

However, in 1892 one of the El Aliso's remaining branches fell and crushed a beer wagon. In a fit of revenge, and over Zobelein's strong objections, Maier had all the branches removed from the tree, leaving only its trunk. By the end of the year El Aliso, which had been growing in LA since Columbus' first voyage, was dead.

El Aliso's lifeless trunk stood in mute reproach until 1895 when local lumberjack Wm Willoughby was hired to fell it. People came from all over to collect wood chips as souvenirs as El Aliso was hacked into firewood, which was then sold. A young boy, Charles Gibbs Adams (1884-1953), later the designer of the Virginia Robinson Gardens in Beverly Hills and co-designer of the Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Gardens in Arcadia, counted the 400 rings on the stump. Maier died in 1904.

Los Angeles Times, August 16, 1895:
“An Old Landmark Gone” - The old aliso (sycamore tree) was on the site of the Maier & Zobelein Brewery. It was a landmark from time immemorial when Los Angeles was a mere pueblo. It had been venerated by the local Indians for generations as a guide point and was said to have provided shade for the early Spanish settlers and a campground for General Fremont when he wrested California from the Mexicans. For some years Maier had wanted to remove the tree in order to expand the brewery. Zobelein was very emotional about the old landmark and succeeded at one point in having the brewery built around it. Eventually, branches fell and damaged a building. Finally the old tree died. Maier said, “That tree has cost us already about $8,000 all on account of Mr. Zobelein's sentiment.” Finally it was chopped down. Various persons took turns, but “Mr. Zobelein has felt too mournful over the fate of his old pet to strike any of its death blows.”

Maier & Zobelein Brewery in about 1900, with the wagon yard at center, where the sycamore, El Aliso, once stood:

phiz - wikimapia

Los Angeles Herald 1908

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

sopas_ej posted about this site earlier. In his photo below one can see the site of El Aliso. According to Nathan Masters (http://www.kcet.org/updaily/socal_fo...a-history.html) it was 153 feet north of Commercial St and 88 feet east of Garey. A survey would pinpoint it:

Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
One last image of El Aliso. In this undated model of LA circa 1850, it's on the right surrounded by El Aliso winery. The model-makers got the location of Yangna right too.
(first published on this thread by jsjansen on page 122)




Yangna was one of dozens of villages in what was to become LA. Each was built at one of the abundant water sources that used to crisscross the land or bubble up from underground (Sacatela Creek for instance).

militantangeleno

Most of these villages have been erased almost without a trace, their water sources forced into storm drains before they reach the surface, their sites built over. Some are remembered as present-day place names: Cahuenga ("the mountain place"), Topanga ("place where the mountains meet the sea"), Tujunga ("place of the wise woman"), Cucamonga ("the sandy place"), Pacoima ("place of the rushing waters"), etc.

At least two remain somewhat intact. Siutcangna is now 5-acre Los Encinos State Historic Park, on Ventura Blvd at Moorpark. The spring is enclosed in a 19th-century, stone spring house, but the lake it feeds is still there. The overflow used to run to the Los Angeles River, but is now diverted into a storm drain.

Except for surrounding development, the scene is essentially unchanged from the 1945 view below. The de La Ossa adobe, built in 1849 is on the left, the Garnier Building (1868) is at rightr, built by different owners of Rancho Los Encinos, one Mexican, the other Basque, The lake is in the foreground. Rancho Los Encinos was originally granted to Francisco Reyes, the mayor of LA from 1793-95, but he was accused of mistreating his indigenous Tongva workers (almost all California vaqueros were Indians), prompting Govenor Pio Pico to re-grant the land to three of these same workers and their families.

Siutcanga had its own big tree, the 1,000-year-old Lang Oak, situated on a traffic island at Louise and Ventura, outside the boundaries of the present park. Over a hundred years older than the Norman Conquest, it was seven stories tall, with a 150' canopy and a trunk diameter of 24'. Weakened by disease and its urban environment, it fell in a storm in 1998.

In 2011 the State of California threatened to close the park as it makes no money. Private donations have, so far, kept this from happening.

water and power

Kuruvungna, is on the SE corner of the University High School campus in West LA, near Barrington Ave and Santa Monica Blvd. The two springs at Kuruvungna produce 22,000 gallons of water per day which is allowed to fill a large pond, with a small island, before the overflow is diverted into a storm drain. The water used to flow out to the vast Ballona Wetlands and then into Santa Monica Bay, as the Los Angeles river once did before its course changed during the 1845 flood.

Kuruvungna is unusual in that it is controlled by the Tongva People who lease the site from the school district. Sometime after Uni was built in 1924 the two springs were landscaped and made a campus feature, the pond surrounded by manicured lawns and rose gardens. However, by the 1980's the area was derelict and used as a dump. The Tongva removed tons of accumulated trash and replanted the area with tule reeds and other native plants. The lower spring is open; one can see the water bubbling up through the sand under the surface of the crystal-clear water. The upper spring, just outside of the Tongva-controlled area, is hidden under a manhole cover, although the water is allowed out for a bit to spill over a little man-made concrete waterfall arrangement before it heads down the storm drain. The site is open the first Saturday of every month. There is also a festival held annually in October.

t2 II

Another place name note: When the Portola Expedition came through in 1769 to found the Missions and Presidios up the coast of Alta California (in order to check the Russians and the English) they stopped at Kuruvungna on August 4th, between their visits to Yangna and Siutcangna:

"...we stopped at a watering place, which consists of two little springs that rise at the foot of a higher mesa. From each of the springs runs a small stream of water...both full of watercress and innumerable bushes of Castilian (native, single, pink) roses. We made camp near the springs where we found a village of very friendly and peaceful Indians, who, as soon as we arrived, came to visit us...I understood that they were asking if we were going to stay and I said, 'No'..." -quoted from an entry in the diary of Fray Juan Crespi with the Portola Expedition, 4 August 1769

Father Crespi renamed the village "San Gregorio", but the soldiers called it "El Berrendo" after a deer they wounded there. Later, incoming settlers called the pair of springs after Santa Monica because they reminded them of the weeping eyes of the saint as she cried for her son. The name was soon used on a grazing permit and the next year, 1828, it was recorded on a land grant for Rancho Boca de Santa Monica and later still on the Rancho Sepulveda y Santa Monica land grant (which actually included Kuruvungna Springs). The name has since been applied to the canyon, the mountains, the city, the bay, the boulevard, the airport and the freeway.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 18, 2017 at 12:14 AM. Reason: fix link, add image
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  #10489  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 10:09 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BDiH View Post
Isn't this building still at the southeast corner of Franklin Avenue and Orange Drive in Hollywood?
You and JoeGillis are so right. I mistook the street running from the left margin of the photo up to Hollywood Blvd for Orange, as nothing else goes through anymore these days.
I certainly got seriously lost in that photo.

Homeowner and silent screen star Conway Tearle:

synergy

Thx for the post e_r. I've never seen a shot of the back of the Hollywood Hotel before.
I love your challenges to find locations, even if I occasionally crash & burn.

Last edited by tovangar2; Nov 27, 2012 at 10:13 PM. Reason: add pic
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  #10490  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 10:28 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Cross-country Endurance Tramps

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
"Consumption cured by Tuberclecide"
__
Was there a fad for "Endurance Tramps"? (the other sign says, "Endurance Tramp from Los Angeles to NY".) Charles Lummis made his famous one from Cincinnati to LA in 1884-1885.
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  #10491  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 2:34 PM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
The streamline moderne court is beautiful. I don't remember ever seeing it. It may be gone.



That's a great lamppost/Christmas tree in front of Bradley's Five & Dime in the last photo. I got a kick out of that.

1706 Cherokee Avenue, "St. Francis Terrace Court Apartments."
You can glimpse the bungalows in the Bradley's photo.
lapl

This is confirmed using map provided here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=8053

Alas, the "Bradley's" bldg. is still there, but not the residences around the corner.
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  #10492  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 3:52 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcarlton View Post
Early newspaper box?


Good guess, especially since there is a nearby bucket upon which a paperboy might sit or stand. But it would not be my first choice since there are newspapers displayed (probably for sale) in the pharmacy entrance. Another clue is that there might be a crank or handle on the side of the device and a domed/clamshell top. This suggests the possibility that it is an amusement device. I do not recognize it as a common "Mutoscope" but that does not mean it couldn't house one or a similar device. After all this is 1907 and there may have been many odd startups. Because the pharmacy seems open, it could literally be a one-machine sidewalk arcade, that might be used to draw business.

An even remoter possibility that it was musical/sound recording device temporarily left on the sidewalk.



1920's mutoscope


http://www.google.com


Or . . .

"Waste Receptacle for Pedestrian use." (What happens if a motorist or bicyclist uses it?)

google

Larger image (if it posts): http://www.shorpy.com/node/6853?size=_original
shorpy

Last edited by BifRayRock; Nov 28, 2012 at 3:05 AM.
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  #10493  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 3:59 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Unk location. "On the road . . . February '35." Let's hope the weather remains nice this time of year - especially for those riding in the back.


Larger version:http://www.shorpy.com/node/11844?size=_original
shorpy

Last edited by BifRayRock; Nov 28, 2012 at 1:45 AM.
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  #10494  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:16 PM
srk1941 srk1941 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProphetM View Post
Online research indicates that this PE line was closed in early 1951, so the photos are more likely to be from the 1940s than the 1950s.
From the clothing the woman is wearing, I would think this photo is prior to 1947
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  #10495  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:33 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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A M A Z I N G.....1905 to 2012 in the heart of Hollywood.

1905


2012/posted by Joe Gillis


I expected this little jewel to be gone gone. What a pleasant surprise!


Thanks for the information on Eastside beer T2...very interesting.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Nov 27, 2012 at 4:46 PM.
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  #10496  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:38 PM
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Kuruvungna, is on the SE corner of the University High School campus in West LA, near Barrington Ave and Santa Monica Blvd. The two springs at Kuruvungna produce 22,000 gallons of water per day which is allowed to fill a large pond, with a small island, before the overflow is diverted into a storm drain. The water used to flow out to the vast Ballona Wetlands and then into Santa Monica Bay, as the Los Angeles river once did before its course changed during the 1845 flood.

Kuruvungna is unusual in that it is controlled by the Tongva People who lease the site from the school district. When Uni was built in 1924 the two springs were landscaped and made a campus feature, the pond surrounded by manicured lawns and rose gardens. However, by the 1980's the area was derelict and used as a dump. The Tongva removed tons of accumulated trash and replanted the area with tule reeds and other native plants. The lower spring is open; one can see the water bubbling up through the sand. The upper spring, just outside of the Tongva-controlled area, is hidden under a manhole cover. The site is open the first Saturday of every month. There is also a festival held annually in October.

http://www.gabrielinosprings.com

Kuruvungna Springs is under constant threat, the latest from the YMCA, which is determined to get hold of the site, divert the springs into the storm drain before they reach the surface, and build a new facility on the land.

Another place name note: When the Portola Expedition came through in 1769 to found the Missions and Presidios up the coast of Alta California (in order to check the Russians) they stopped at Kuruvungna on August 3rd, between their visits to Yangna and Siutcangna. Father Crespi renamed the village "San Gregorio", but the soldiers called it "El Berrendo" after a deer they wounded there.

Later, incoming settlers called the pair of springs after Santa Monica because they reminded them of the weeping eyes of the saint as she cried for her son. The name was soon used on a grazing permit and the next year,1828, it was recorded on a land grant for Rancho Boca de Santa Monica and later still on the Rancho Sepulveda y Santa Monica land grant (which actually included Kuruvungna Springs). The name as since been applied to the canyon, the mountains, the city, the bay, the boulevard, the airport and the freeway.[/QUOTE]

i know the springs very well i went to uni(hence the name),the springs were not maintained until around 1939,in the late 50s they re-routed the spring that is near the upper field.the lagoon has held alot of activites since.there is also one building used for classes in the main spring/lagoon area.
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  #10497  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
Thx for the post e_r. I've never seen a shot of the back of the Hollywood Hotel before.
I love your challenges to find locations, even if I occasionally crash & burn.
Here's another one that is confusing to me. Hollywood around 1910.


ebay
__

I'm out of town for a couple days. Have fun everyone!
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  #10498  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:45 PM
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FredH FredH is offline
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Hey, ethereal_reality:

Could this be an old police call box? It looks like it may have been hooked up to some
sort of a power or phone line.
The whole pole is gone in the newer photos.


ebay


marymiley.files.wordpress.com


By the way, your noting that old Eastside Beer sign on my simple screen grab
started two or three great conversations on related topics. That's what makes
this site so interesting and dynamic.
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  #10499  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 4:55 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Godzilla View Post
1937 - NW corner Hollywood and Cherokee
lapl
Similar XMAS decorations, some recycled from prior year?
Circa '38 -'39 (?).




All USCDigital
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  #10500  
Old Posted Nov 27, 2012, 8:18 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Highland & Frranklin

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Here's another one that is confusing to me. Hollywood around 1910.


ebay
__

I'm out of town for a couple days. Have fun everyone!
That's Highland snaking down to Hollywood Blvd, as it still does, joining the mismatched ends of Franklin. The Hollywood Hotel at Hollywood and Highland is on the left.
The photo was taken in 1904, not 1910. The addition to the Hollywood Hotel isn't up yet (compare with the 1905 photo you posted on the previous page of this same area).
Must be autumn, the field behind the hotel has been harvested, but not gathered in.

Opposite view, looking north (with the addition of the Hollywood United Methodist Church and etc.). The two bits of Franklin still don't match:

trip advisor


Another early (pre-addition) view of the Hollywood Hotel, with strawberry fields in the foreground on both sides of Sunset:

DWP/LAPL

And speaking of Highland and Franklin, I'm prompted to add another shameless plug for a fave film.
Mary (Constance Bennett) marries Lonny (Neil Hamilton) at the Hollywood United Methodist Church (Thomas P. Barber, 1930),
Franklin & Highland, in "What Price Hollywood?" (1932)

RKO-Pathe

RKO-Pathe

RKO-Pathe

Last edited by tovangar2; Jul 3, 2015 at 6:10 PM. Reason: shrink photo
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