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  #21  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2020, 1:00 AM
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Istanbul: Hagia Sophia





Built by the eastern Roman emperor Justinian I as the Christian cathedral of Constantinople for the state church of the Roman Empire between 532 and 537, Hagia Sophia was then the world's largest interior space and among the first to employ a fully pendentive dome. It is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture and is said to have "changed the history of architecture". The building was designed by the Greek geometers Isidore of Miletus and Anthemius of Tralles. The present Justinianic building was the third church of the same name to occupy the site, the prior one having been destroyed in the Nika riots. Being the episcopal see of the ecumenical patriarch of Constantinople, it remained the world's largest cathedral for nearly a thousand years, until Seville Cathedral was completed in 1520. Beginning with subsequent Byzantine architecture, Hagia Sophia became the paradigmatic Orthodox church form and its architectural style was emulated by Ottoman mosques a thousand years later. It has been described as "holding a unique position in the Christian world", and architectural and cultural icon of Byzantine and Eastern Orthodox civilization. The church was dedicated to the Holy Wisdom, the Logos, the second person of the Trinity. Its patronal feast falls on 25 December, the commemoration of the incarnation of the Logos in Christ. Sophia is the Latin transliteration of the Greek word for wisdom and, although sometimes referred to as Sancta Sophia, 'Saint Sophia', it is not connected with Sophia the Martyr. The centre of the Eastern Orthodox Church for nearly one thousand years, the building witnessed the excommunication of Patriarch Michael I Cerularius officially delivered by Humbert of Silva Candida, the papal envoy of Pope Leo IX in 1054, an act that is commonly considered the start of the East–West Schism. In 1204, it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire, before being restored to the Eastern Orthodox Church upon the return of the Byzantine Empire in 1261. The doge of Venice who led the Fourth Crusade and the 1204 Sack of Constantinople, Enrico Dandolo, was buried in the church.














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Old Posted Aug 8, 2020, 1:00 AM
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  #23  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2020, 1:01 AM
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Old Posted Aug 8, 2020, 1:02 AM
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Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 12:58 AM
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Istanbul: Yeni Valide Mosque





Located in the Üsküdar district, in the Asian sector of Istanbul, the Yeni Valide Mosque was built in the 18th century. Commissioned by Sultan Ahmed III, it is recognized for being one of the first mosques to use the crushed dome.














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Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 12:59 AM
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Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 12:59 AM
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Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 2:12 AM
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Wondering if people in Istanbul adopt the street cats. In Rome, which is also a cat city, people do adopt some of them. Cat colonies are also fed by citizens of Rome, and I assume that happens in Istanbul.
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  #29  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2020, 8:08 PM
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Wondering if people in Istanbul adopt the street cats. In Rome, which is also a cat city, people do adopt some of them. Cat colonies are also fed by citizens of Rome, and I assume that happens in Istanbul.

yes, similar in their way. locals definitely own cats, but the ones you see the most are neighborhood cats the locals take care of. some very specifically.

also, the cats seem much tamer than in america, which i think reflects that urban community care.

you can find out all about istanbul cats if you want by checking out the super cute documentary called kedi, which is turkish for ... you guessed it!

here is the trailer:
https://youtu.be/lKq7UqplcL8
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  #30  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 1:04 AM
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Istanbul: Topkapi Palace





The Topkapı Palace is a large museum in the east of the Fatih district of Istanbul in Turkey. In the 15th and 16th centuries it served as the main residence and administrative headquarters of the Ottoman sultans.n Construction, ordered by the Sultan Mehmed the Conqueror, began in 1459, six years after the conquest of Constantinople. Topkapı was originally called the "New Palace" to distinguish it from the Old Palace in Beyazıt Square. It was given the name Topkapı, meaning Cannon Gate, in the 19th century. The complex expanded over the centuries, with major renovations after the 1509 earthquake and the 1665 fire. The palace complex consists of four main courtyards and many smaller buildings. Female members of the Sultan's family lived in the harem, and leading state officials, including the Grand Vizier, held meetings in the Imperial Council building. After the 17th century, Topkapı gradually lost its importance. The sultans of that period preferred to spend more time in their new palaces along the Bosphorus. In 1856 Sultan Abdulmejid I decided to move the court to the newly built Dolmabahçe Palace. Topkapı retained some of its functions, including the imperial treasury, library and mint. After the end of the Ottoman Empire in 1923, a government decree dated April 3, 1924 transformed Topkapı into a museum. Turkey's Ministry of Culture and Tourism now administers the Topkapı Palace Museum. The palace complex has hundreds of rooms and chambers, but only the most important are accessible to the public as of 2020, including the Ottoman Imperial Harem and the treasury, called hazine where the Spoonmaker's Diamond and the Topkapi Dagger are on display. The museum collection also includes Ottoman clothing, weapons, armor, miniatures, religious relics, and illuminated manuscripts such as the Topkapi manuscript.















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  #31  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 1:06 AM
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Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 1:07 AM
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  #33  
Old Posted Aug 15, 2020, 1:08 AM
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  #34  
Old Posted Aug 16, 2020, 3:37 AM
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yes, similar in their way. locals definitely own cats, but the ones you see the most are neighborhood cats the locals take care of. some very specifically.

also, the cats seem much tamer than in america, which i think reflects that urban community care.

you can find out all about istanbul cats if you want by checking out the super cute documentary called kedi, which is turkish for ... you guessed it!

here is the trailer:
https://youtu.be/lKq7UqplcL8
Thanks for the trailer!
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  #35  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2020, 12:07 AM
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Istanbul: Gazi Atik Ali Paşa Camii (Mosque)





The Gazi Atik Ali Pasha Mosque is a 15th-century Ottoman mosque located in the Çemberlitaş neighbourhood of the Fatih district in Istanbul, Turkey. Its construction was started under the orders of the future Grand Vizier Hadım Atik Ali Pasha in 1496 and was completed in 1497, during the reign of Sultan Bayezid II. The mosque is located near the entrance to the Kapalıçarşı (Grand Bazaar), the Column of Constantine, and the historical Nuruosmaniye Mosque.




































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Old Posted Aug 20, 2020, 12:08 AM
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Old Posted Aug 22, 2020, 12:19 AM
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Istanbul: Blue Mosque





The Blue Mosque is an Ottoman-era mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey. A functioning mosque, it also attracts large numbers of tourist visitors. It was constructed between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed's tomb, a madrasah and a hospice. Hand-painted blue tiles adorn the mosque’s interior walls, and at night the mosque is bathed in blue as lights frame the mosque’s five main domes, six minarets and eight secondary domes. It sits next to the Hagia Sophia, the principal mosque of Istanbul until the Blue Mosque's construction and another popular tourist site. After the Peace of Zsitvatorok and the crushing loss in the 1603–18 war with Persia, Sultan Ahmet I decided to build a large mosque in Istanbul to reassert Ottoman power. It would be the first imperial mosque for more than forty years. While his predecessors had paid for their mosques with the spoils of war, Ahmet I procured funds from the Treasury, because he had not gained remarkable victories. The construction was started in 1609 and completed in 1616. It caused the anger of the ulama, the Muslim jurists. The mosque was built on the site of the palace of the Byzantine emperors, in front of the basilica Hagia Sophia (at that time, the primary imperial mosque in Istanbul) and the hippodrome, a site of significant symbolic meaning as it dominated the city skyline from the south. Big parts of the south shore of the mosque rest on the foundations, the vaults of the old Grand Palace.














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Old Posted Aug 22, 2020, 12:20 AM
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Old Posted Aug 22, 2020, 12:20 AM
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Old Posted Aug 22, 2020, 12:22 AM
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