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  #981  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 1:19 AM
Vin Vin is offline
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Originally Posted by giallo View Post
You're advocating a death sentence for many by enforcing a cold turkey program, Vin. The US spend over a trillion dollars on that war, and it didn't amount to anything at all. The private prison industry boomed. That's about it.

If someone wants to do drugs until they die, well, I guess that's their decision - it is a free country after all, but in order for the impact of that decision to lessen for the rest of us, the government has to get involved. Why we still allow the black market to regulate the drug supply in 2021 is beyond me. An unregulated, potentially dangerous product and high prices all have a direct effect on society, whether they do a drug or not.

Regulate it, price it accordingly, and use the tax dollars to start to fund really solutions to the issues that create an addictive individual. Is it going to be weird to be able to by opioids from an online store.....yeah, it will be for a bit, but if it keeps people from ODing from an unreliable product, it's affordable enough so you don't have to worry about random addicts stealing your copper wire for a fix, and we start to see properly-funded hospitals and housing to help those that truly need it, then it's a pretty good trade off.
Oh really? Death sentence? On the contrary, by not doing that we are meting out death sentences to them already, not to mention the drain in public dollars.

500 deaths so far in 2021:
https://globalnews.ca/news/7819752/b...rs-march-2021/

So 500 people died this year because they went cold turkey? Nope, not at all. They could still be alive if they actually did. Agreeing to the status quo is like letting users die on the streets.
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  #982  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 1:23 AM
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Originally Posted by mcminsen View Post
Just another day on Robson Street.

I just got in now after watching some deranged guy on a vandalizing spree. He was kicking over the newspaper boxes and then going over to the barriers at the road construction and breaking off all the yellow flashing lights, throwing the traffic cones into the holes in the street and just messing up or breaking anything he could get his hands on.

Lots of people were on the street and a lot of them turned to look but of course nobody got involved. I considered taking some pics but decided not to.

When I got to Homer Street the guy was carrying on towards the stadium like a one man wrecking crew.
Of course VPD did nothing. He's probably high: should be locked up till he's not using anymore.
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  #983  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 2:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Vin View Post
Oh really? Death sentence? On the contrary, by not doing that we are meting out death sentences to them already, not to mention the drain in public dollars.

500 deaths so far in 2021:
https://globalnews.ca/news/7819752/b...rs-march-2021/

So 500 people died this year because they went cold turkey? Nope, not at all. They could still be alive if they actually did. Agreeing to the status quo is like letting users die on the streets.
Sigh. It must be Friday - time for another Vin Igno-rant.

Families of drug users have greater understanding than you do. Your comments are the perfect illustration of the stigma that is part of the reason that people are dying. Families across BC are calling for a safe supply. One reason is that increasingly it's not fantanyl that's being added to drugs, it's benzodiazepine, which isn't reversed by Naloxone.

And many - the majority - of the people dying are not street-using addicts. They're not in the DTES (despite the title of this thread, which seems to be redundant). They were casual users, or people dealing with anxiety, or depression, or an opiate addiction related to prescribed painkillers, with homes they lived in. For example, of the six people who died of drug overdoses in Surrey in the past week, five of them died at home.
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  #984  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 4:39 AM
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Originally Posted by SpongeG View Post
On Robson just east of Granville there was a woman walking down the street which had a steady stream of people, many looking they were leaving work etc, anyway she had her top lifted up with her breasts fully exposed at times playing with them like bongos or just slapping them around, she wasn't making any weird noises or anything just walking down the street letting everything out there. People looked a little shocked passing by.
Fun fact. Being topless in BC is not illegal.

Or at least, it was still legal five years ago. I vaguely recall in school we thought that was an urban legend.
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  #985  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 6:47 AM
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oh i know, it was a woman in Maple Ridge who was fighting to make it legal. I used to see her all the time around MR with no top on back in the day. Not many women choose to exercise that right though.
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  #986  
Old Posted May 1, 2021, 12:49 PM
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Lynda Myers was her name, and a sighting of her was a common conversation piece growing up in Maple Ridge, but let’s just say not in a flattering way.
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  #987  
Old Posted May 2, 2021, 2:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Changing City View Post
Sigh. It must be Friday - time for another Vin Igno-rant.

Families of drug users have greater understanding than you do. Your comments are the perfect illustration of the stigma that is part of the reason that people are dying. Families across BC are calling for a safe supply. One reason is that increasingly it's not fantanyl that's being added to drugs, it's benzodiazepine, which isn't reversed by Naloxone.

And many - the majority - of the people dying are not street-using addicts. They're not in the DTES (despite the title of this thread, which seems to be redundant). They were casual users, or people dealing with anxiety, or depression, or an opiate addiction related to prescribed painkillers, with homes they lived in. For example, of the six people who died of drug overdoses in Surrey in the past week, five of them died at home.

Majority are hardworking folks fighting depression? Show your stats please.
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  #988  
Old Posted May 2, 2021, 2:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Vin View Post
Majority are hardworking folks fighting depression? Show your stats please.
That's not what I wrote. I said the majority dying are not street-using addicts. The people you identify as needing to be removed from the streets and forced to detox 'cold turkey'.

Here the coroner's report for 2020. "More than 80 per cent of drug overdose deaths occurred indoors: 56 per cent inside private residences and 28 per cent in other residences like supportive housing, single-residence occupancies, shelters and hotels."

And in January this year "More than half of deadly overdoses in January happened inside a home. Men accounted for 83 per cent of the deaths."
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  #989  
Old Posted May 4, 2021, 6:26 PM
Vin Vin is offline
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Originally Posted by Changing City View Post
That's not what I wrote. I said the majority dying are not street-using addicts. The people you identify as needing to be removed from the streets and forced to detox 'cold turkey'.

Here the coroner's report for 2020. "More than 80 per cent of drug overdose deaths occurred indoors: 56 per cent inside private residences and 28 per cent in other residences like supportive housing, single-residence occupancies, shelters and hotels."

And in January this year "More than half of deadly overdoses in January happened inside a home. Men accounted for 83 per cent of the deaths."
The DTES does not only have street folks, there are tons of drug addicts in supportive housing. Shelters are also indoor places, public toilets are as well. So what's your point here?

Putting hardcore addicts in facilities to help them overcome the problem is the only way to save them, period. Insane methods like giving them free drugs are simply irresponsible and downright atrocious, and can only be dreamed up by societies going on a downward spin.
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  #990  
Old Posted May 4, 2021, 6:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Vin View Post
The DTES does not only have street folks, there are tons of drug addicts in supportive housing. Shelters are also indoor places, public toilets are as well. So what's your point here?

Putting hardcore addicts in facilities to help them overcome the problem is the only way to save them, period. Insane methods like giving them free drugs are simply irresponsible and downright atrocious, and can only be dreamed up by societies going on a downward spin.
My point is that the majority of people in the past several years who have died in BC using drugs have died at home. And the majority are not in Vancouver, and therefore not in the DTES.

There aren't enough treatment options, and many times they don't stick - even with supports in place many addicts return to using when there's a crisis in their lives. Providing a safe drug supply in the meantime until there are sufficient treatment and support options (if we're willing to fund them) would stop people dying from lethal chemicals that aren't the drugs they thought they'd bought. It should also reduce the crime that occurs to fund the drug purchases.

But even if there were these 'facilities' to 'put' people in to 'help them overcome their problems', that wouldn't prevent the majority of deaths being caused by a tainted and lethal drug supply. How do you propose to save all those lives? 'Just Say No' doesn't seem to be working.
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  #991  
Old Posted May 7, 2021, 10:22 PM
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So has strathcona park been closed for cleanup or are there still homeless campers there? I'm just wondering how the transition went?

I'm also wondering if any of the homeless just relocated to another park.
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  #992  
Old Posted May 11, 2021, 9:50 AM
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Originally Posted by SeymourDrake View Post
So has strathcona park been closed for cleanup or are there still homeless campers there? I'm just wondering how the transition went?

I'm also wondering if any of the homeless just relocated to another park.
I've been seeing some campers still kicking around at night, but oddly enough they're on the street rather than in the park.
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