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  #181  
Old Posted Jul 25, 2021, 4:52 PM
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thanks for sharing the Japanese stroads. during my visits to Japan, I was mostly in the heart of the big cities, with a couple of side trips out to the coast (e.g., Enoshima, Kamakura). One thing I rarely see here in North America are overhead pedestrian crossings. They are everywhere in China/Japan/Korea.
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  #182  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
thanks for sharing the Japanese stroads. during my visits to Japan, I was mostly in the heart of the big cities, with a couple of side trips out to the coast (e.g., Enoshima, Kamakura). One thing I rarely see here in North America are overhead pedestrian crossings. They are everywhere in China/Japan/Korea.
It is interesting how different visiting and living somewhere is.

It’s like tourists who visit Vancouver. They see the downtown, maybe the North Shore, and maybe some natural spots, but they generally don’t see Coquitlam, Surrey, Maple Ridge, etc…

I see that a lot with tourists that visit Japan. They tend to miss the lower density urban and suburban areas that are what you see in my daily life pics.
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  #183  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 10:55 AM
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Stroads are an epidemic. They exist in literally every city, in whatever portion was built/rebuilt/redeveloped after WWII. North America is just particularly full of them, because so much of our development is newer.
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  #184  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Metro-One View Post
It is interesting how different visiting and living somewhere is.

It’s like tourists who visit Vancouver. They see the downtown, maybe the North Shore, and maybe some natural spots, but they generally don’t see Coquitlam, Surrey, Maple Ridge, etc…

I see that a lot with tourists that visit Japan. They tend to miss the lower density urban and suburban areas that are what you see in my daily life pics.
It's interesting to observe that "real life" isn't necessarily Shinjuku, or the Entertainment District of Toronto, nor the City in London, nor the Strip of Las Vegas.

It's the back suburbs of Fukuoka. Toronto's suburbs and satellite cities. The outer boroughs of London, or the vast dreck of suburbia surrounding Las Vegas (try driving city streets into Vegas).

It's cool to see pictures of places of these places from someone who lives in Japan. The less-known Japan.
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  #185  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 4:01 PM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
thanks for sharing the Japanese stroads. during my visits to Japan, I was mostly in the heart of the big cities, with a couple of side trips out to the coast (e.g., Enoshima, Kamakura). One thing I rarely see here in North America are overhead pedestrian crossings. They are everywhere in China/Japan/Korea.
Overhead pedestrian crossings are everywhere in Mexico, and they are somewhat common in Metro Vancouver. There are several in New Westminster, including two over McBride Blvd and one over Stewardson Way. There's also one over Lougheed Highway in Port Coquitlam, and one over Kingsway across from Metropolis at Metrotown.

The Brentwood Town Centre station on the Millennium Line also has this as a secondary function over Lougheed Highway, and they've even added a direct connection to the new Amazing Brentwood.
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  #186  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 4:04 PM
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Originally Posted by jamincan View Post
I think it's mostly to keep a buffer around the lines to avoid arcing and inductance. In some cases they might have reserved capacity in the ROW for future capacity.
Back in the early 80s there was actually a plan for a GO rail line that ran alongside the hydro corridor on the north side of Metro Toronto. It never got built.
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  #187  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 9:12 PM
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Originally Posted by manny_santos View Post
Back in the early 80s there was actually a plan for a GO rail line that ran alongside the hydro corridor on the north side of Metro Toronto. It never got built.
Is that the corridor that became the 407 or the one next to the 403 in Mississauga, the 401 at Pearson and then between Steeles and Finch?
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  #188  
Old Posted Jul 26, 2021, 9:21 PM
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Originally Posted by manny_santos View Post
Back in the early 80s there was actually a plan for a GO rail line that ran alongside the hydro corridor on the north side of Metro Toronto. It never got built.
MTO actually just revived this idea in their draft Regional Transportation Plan.
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  #189  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Franco401 View Post
Is that the corridor that became the 407 or the one next to the 403 in Mississauga, the 401 at Pearson and then between Steeles and Finch?
I don’t know the full extent of it but the portion through North York was the hydro corridor just north of Finch.
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  #190  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 10:25 AM
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Second time poster, long time stroad hater

The extreme over-zoning in most of Canada and the nearly complete lack of zoning in Japan somehow both result in stroads. They're multiplying and taking over the world.

Hello, I discovered this forum a few weeks ago, and started reading older posts at work to try to catch up a bit, but I can't post anything on my computer at work, and then I never got around to it at home...until now.

Last edited by VanCanMan; Jul 27, 2021 at 10:48 AM.
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  #191  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 2:59 PM
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Originally Posted by VanCanMan View Post
The extreme over-zoning in most of Canada and the nearly complete lack of zoning in Japan somehow both result in stroads.
Stroads are a natural response to a growth in activity along a road. First you have a two lane country road that's a well-functioning road, then some businesses move in adding traffic, then more businesses move in, and then the local government does the easiest thing, which is to widen the road along its existing right of way and designate it as a commercial artery.

The alternative: building a bypass road with limited access/egress and putting commercial and residential activities on a separate street, is much more difficult.
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  #192  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 4:56 PM
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Heaven forbid we actually plan our cities out....
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  #193  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 5:03 PM
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Heaven forbid we actually plan our cities for people rather than for vehicles...
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  #194  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 5:13 PM
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Originally Posted by MolsonExport View Post
Heaven forbid we actually plan our cities for people rather than for vehicles...
Hey, there are people in those vehicles.

Humour aside, I'm in total agreement.
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  #195  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 5:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Truenorth00 View Post
Heaven forbid we actually plan our cities out....
But a lot of these stroads aren’t even built in major cities. They’re in small towns with limited resources - both money and expertise.

It’s kind of hard to justify going through the battle of expropriating private property and then designing and building a second road when you can just upgrade an existing road in a municipally-owned right of way. I don’t like striads, either, but I can understand why they became so commonplace in countries as diverse as Canada and Japan.
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  #196  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 5:22 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
It’s kind of hard to justify going through the battle of expropriating private property and then designing and building a second road when you can just upgrade an existing road in a municipally-owned right of way. I don’t like striads, either, but I can understand why they became so commonplace in countries as diverse as Canada and Japan.
I'm entirely unfamiliar but are Japanese residential and commercial property zoning and laws similar to Canada/US, at least for the purposes of moving things around for infrastructure builds? I know places like China don't really run into the issue of expropriating private property because, well...
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  #197  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 5:27 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
But a lot of these stroads aren’t even built in major cities. They’re in small towns with limited resources - both money and expertise.

It’s kind of hard to justify going through the battle of expropriating private property and then designing and building a second road when you can just upgrade an existing road in a municipally-owned right of way. I don’t like striads, either, but I can understand why they became so commonplace in countries as diverse as Canada and Japan.
It also becomes a jurisdictional issue as these major roads through smaller communities are often designated as provincial highways, and it's the province's decision to build a bypass.

Dryden, Ont. is a good example of this - Highway 17 goes through the town, is under municipal jurisdiction in the built-up area, and is a classic stroad. It already bypasses the downtown, and at the time I would imagine it was developed, it needed to provide services to motorists such as gas stations and motels due to its distance from other communities along the highway. Building a second bypass for through traffic would have been uneconomical at that time.

Highway 17 in Sturgeon Falls, if my memory serves me, is very similar.
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  #198  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2021, 6:34 PM
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Originally Posted by manny_santos View Post
It also becomes a jurisdictional issue as these major roads through smaller communities are often designated as provincial highways, and it's the province's decision to build a bypass.

Dryden, Ont. is a good example of this - Highway 17 goes through the town, is under municipal jurisdiction in the built-up area, and is a classic stroad. It already bypasses the downtown, and at the time I would imagine it was developed, it needed to provide services to motorists such as gas stations and motels due to its distance from other communities along the highway. Building a second bypass for through traffic would have been uneconomical at that time.

Highway 17 in Sturgeon Falls, if my memory serves me, is very similar.
When Highway 17 was built originally it was really never conceived as a true bypass of these small towns. It avoided the downtown area because the province didn't want the hassle of dealing with existing property owners in the built-up area.

However, there were still properties abutting the corridor, so accesses were reasonably frequent/common. In fact, these little towns may have wanted the highway to pass close to them.

Whereas Highway 17 through much of the Ottawa valley and sections around Sudbury conceived as a bypass only. It moves through traffic.
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