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View Poll Results: Is SEPTA doing a great job in regards to bus, subway, and commuter rail overall??????
YES 50 49.50%
NO 51 50.50%
Voters: 101. You may not vote on this poll

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  #1641  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2021, 4:57 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by Skintreesnail View Post
A small amount of movement to better integrate septa regional rail with the rest of the system:


https://www.inquirer.com/transportat...-20210921.html

Survey
https://septaregionalrail.typeform.c...www.google.com
Critical, especially for NW Philly. Could really see the train stations boom in NW Philly if riding regional rail was more akin to taking the subway (from a cost and frequency perspective).
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  #1642  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2021, 6:32 PM
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All - the Regional Rail plan seems to be mostly fluff compared to the comprehensive Bus Network Redesign and the so-called "Metro". Bleugh.

While I am certainly all for higher frequency and expanding where Regional Rail serves, I am actually against lowering fares or instituting a flat fare system across the lines. It is zoned for a reason; some Regional Rail lines travel 40 miles from Center City and, in three cases, entirely along Amtrak ROW. This is not cheap.

What I do support is making all Zone 1's fare just $2.50 to match with the subways, trolleys, and busses. I believe this was the original intent of Zone 1 and what SEPTA will end up doing after all is said and done. The city's transit plan included using the SEPTA Maine Line from Fern Rock to Penn Medicine as a "Silver Line" (appropriately named) with subway-like frequency and fares. This is much more in line with Vuchic's original idea for the Center City Commuter Connection and an endeavor that I wholeheartedly support.

Most lines, especially the PAO, the MED, the TRE, the WIL, and the DOY should be run, at the very least, at half hour frequencies on weekends and off peak. Twenty minute headways would be perfect, but for lines like the CYN and FOX, likely unrealistic (though I do think an infill stop on the Cynwyd line at the Mann Music Center might be a good idea). The CHW/E lines can perhaps run every 45 minutes, with one leaving at 1:00, the other line leaving at 1:23, then 1:45 on the other line, etc.

The most important thing SEPTA can do to improve Regional Rail outside of frequency is expanding its reach. It is shocking to me that no move has been made to even evaluate returning to Quakertown. Other communities that should be considered include West Chester, Parkesburg (and maybe even Lancaster), Newtown, New Hope, and perhaps even the Octoraro Branch.
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  #1643  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2021, 3:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
All - the Regional Rail plan seems to be mostly fluff compared to the comprehensive Bus Network Redesign and the so-called "Metro". Bleugh.

While I am certainly all for higher frequency and expanding where Regional Rail serves, I am actually against lowering fares or instituting a flat fare system across the lines. It is zoned for a reason; some Regional Rail lines travel 40 miles from Center City and, in three cases, entirely along Amtrak ROW. This is not cheap.

What I do support is making all Zone 1's fare just $2.50 to match with the subways, trolleys, and busses. I believe this was the original intent of Zone 1 and what SEPTA will end up doing after all is said and done. The city's transit plan included using the SEPTA Maine Line from Fern Rock to Penn Medicine as a "Silver Line" (appropriately named) with subway-like frequency and fares. This is much more in line with Vuchic's original idea for the Center City Commuter Connection and an endeavor that I wholeheartedly support.

Most lines, especially the PAO, the MED, the TRE, the WIL, and the DOY should be run, at the very least, at half hour frequencies on weekends and off peak. Twenty minute headways would be perfect, but for lines like the CYN and FOX, likely unrealistic (though I do think an infill stop on the Cynwyd line at the Mann Music Center might be a good idea). The CHW/E lines can perhaps run every 45 minutes, with one leaving at 1:00, the other line leaving at 1:23, then 1:45 on the other line, etc.

The most important thing SEPTA can do to improve Regional Rail outside of frequency is expanding its reach. It is shocking to me that no move has been made to even evaluate returning to Quakertown. Other communities that should be considered include West Chester, Parkesburg (and maybe even Lancaster), Newtown, New Hope, and perhaps even the Octoraro Branch.
Phoenixville as well.
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  #1644  
Old Posted Oct 8, 2021, 5:27 PM
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Is anyone aware of when SEPTA takes delivery of the Bi-Level Coaches? I saw multiple articles stating the 2nd half of 2021 but I've heard nothing of delivery or any new info regarding them
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  #1645  
Old Posted Oct 9, 2021, 11:32 AM
Delthayre Delthayre is offline
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How very helpful

Quote:
Originally Posted by arkitect13 View Post
Is anyone aware of when SEPTA takes delivery of the Bi-Level Coaches? I saw multiple articles stating the 2nd half of 2021 but I've heard nothing of delivery or any new info regarding them
Their entry on page 96 of the FY 2022 SEPTA Capital Budget states that delivery will be from 2022 thorugh 2025 and they are allocated funding, per page 94, through FY 2025.
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  #1646  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2021, 12:17 AM
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SEPTA's King of Prussia rail proposal gains entry into federal funding program

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SEPTA's plan to extend rail service to King of Prussia gained entry into a national program on Monday putting the project in line for a potential boost in federal funding.

The Federal Transportation Administration’s Capital Investment Grant program appropriates funds under its New Starts program for light, heavy, and commuter rail projects, streetcar, and bus rapid transit projects. The New Starts program provides $2.3 billion annually in federal funding to transit projects across the U.S., including extensions to existing systems like the Norristown High Speed Line.

The $2 billion rail line would connect Center City and University City to King of Prussia, a suburban hotbed for development. The proposal would add 4.4 miles to the Norristown High Speed Line.

SEPTA has said it will seek up to 50% of the project’s funding from the Federal Transit Administration's New Starts program.

SEPTA officials called the entry into the New Starts program "a critical milestone in seeking federal funding support and provides the opportunity for continued coordination" with the Federal Transportation Administration.
Article behind paywall here:
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...Pos=1#cxrecs_s
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  #1647  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2021, 12:29 AM
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What a waste.
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  #1648  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2021, 2:06 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
What I do support is making all Zone 1's fare just $2.50 to match with the subways, trolleys, and busses. I believe this was the original intent of Zone 1 and what SEPTA will end up doing after all is said and done. The city's transit plan included using the SEPTA Maine Line from Fern Rock to Penn Medicine as a "Silver Line" (appropriately named) with subway-like frequency and fares. This is much more in line with Vuchic's original idea for the Center City Commuter Connection and an endeavor that I wholeheartedly support.
That's essentially what I'm saying. The 1 thing I'd add is that Zone 1 should be bigger, though, to encompass more stops in Philadelphia. There's no reason why Bridesburg, Tacony, and Lawndale shouldn't be in Zone 1, as well as the stops in Germantown that are zone 2 currently: Upsal, Tuplehocken, and Washington Lane. Wissahickon and Manayunk should also be Zone 1. It makes sense to me that Chestnut Hill would remain Zone 2.
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  #1649  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2021, 4:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Busy Bee View Post
What a waste.
I'm biased toward City transit but why is this more pressing to SEPTA than the BSL extension to the Navy Yard for instance?
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  #1650  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2021, 4:01 PM
arkitect13 arkitect13 is offline
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Originally Posted by PHL10 View Post
I'm biased toward City transit but why is this more pressing to SEPTA than the BSL extension to the Navy Yard for instance?
KOP I think is more visible, people will see the construction regularly, KOP is also I think a place a lot of city residents travel too, basically there doing what will be the most public and visible to increase awareness and gain recognition.
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  #1651  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2021, 4:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arkitect13 View Post
KOP I think is more visible, people will see the construction regularly, KOP is also I think a place a lot of city residents travel too, basically there doing what will be the most public and visible to increase awareness and gain recognition.
And the KOP area is a huge employment center in the area (2nd to CC/UC) and traffic just keeps getting worse so a solid transit option would be great.
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  #1652  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2021, 7:44 PM
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How the Philadelphia region will benefit from Biden’s infrastructure bill

Quote:
Roads, bridges, and public transit are infrastructure, but so are habitat for South Jersey box turtles and a freshwater tidal marsh in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge.

The $1 trillion federal infrastructure spending bill, finally coughed up by Congress and awaiting President Joe Biden’s signature, will invest billions in the Philadelphia region and across the United States. It will be the nation’s largest burst of infrastructure spending in decades.

Here’s how the region expects to benefit from the infrastructure bill:

Pennsylvania
$11.3 billion for highway work and $1.6 billion to replace and repair deficient bridges over five years, per the White House and state officials. About 13%, or 4,217, of Pennsylvania bridges on state, local, and federal highways are in “poor”condition, PennDot says. An estimated 7,540 miles of highway need repair.

$2.8 billion over five years to improve public transportation statewide, including SEPTA.

SEPTA
An extra $120 million in federal money this year, the transit authority estimates. That is on top of about $300 million SEPTA would get under existing formulas for U.S. aid to transit, reauthorized as part of the infrastructure bill.

By the 2026 fiscal year, SEPTA could have received a cumulative $540 million, in addition to its normal allotment of formula-based aid.

One important thing: SEPTA now has certainty for the next five years about its level of federal support, which will help planning.

In addition, SEPTA expects to compete for grants from the $1.75 billion All Stations Accessibility Program to retrofit older transit stations for people with disabilities. Any awards would accelerate an ongoing program to make accessible all stations on the Broad Street and Market-Frankford Lines.

SEPTA also wants to win money from a Federal Transit Administration discretionary grant program to spend on two top projects — the planned $1.8 billion modernization of its trolley network and planned $2 billion expansion of light-rail service to King of Prussia.

Federal grants require states and localities to put up matching funds.

New Jersey
$6.9 billion for highways and $1.1 billion for bridge repairs and replacement, according to the White House.

$4.2 billion for transit over the next five years, including NJ Transit. About 25% of New Jersey’s transit buses and trains are in need of replacement, the state says.

Among the state’s transportation priorities: $72 million needed to help complete the $900 million project connecting I-295, I-76, and Route 42 in Camden County.

$8 billion more toward the Gateway Project to improve Northeast Corridor rail connections between New Jersey and New York. Plans are to build a new two-track tunnel under the Hudson River and repair the existing tunnel, which is 100 years old and was damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Some bridges in North Jersey would also be repaired.

$30 billion from an Amtrak Northeast Corridor improvement program could also go toward the massive Gateway Project. Faster trips on the corridor would benefit New Jersey’s economy as well as Southeastern Pennsylvania’s.

Reconnecting Communities
The $1 billion would fund a grant program for planning and construction of projects to reconnect communities. It was whittled down from Biden’s initial proposal of $20 billion. “This is a great start,” Evans said.

$4 billion for the same purpose is included in the pending Build Back Better Act, a second proposed installment of infrastructure and social spending that is now the subject of intense congressional negotiations.

Communities and states would compete for a share of the money for highway removal. As currently drafted, the legislation gives Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg wide latitude to make the grant awards.

Delaware River watershed
$26 million in supplemental funding over five years to help with wildlife conservation and environmental programs — a windfall of $5.2 million annually for the Delaware River Basin Restoration Program. The restoration program was created in 2016 and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Read/view more here:
https://www.inquirer.com/transportat...-20211109.html
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