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  #901  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2021, 3:38 PM
FreddyGuy FreddyGuy is offline
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Originally Posted by Freddypop View Post
Yes...The KV communities are included in the Saint John CMA numbers but Oromocto is not included in Freddy's numbers. This is because of the rule definition of a CMA due to the fact that commuting patterns for work purposes to Base Gagetown. If not for this rule, Freddy would have had CMA status several years ago.
Is it because not enough people commute from Fredericton to Oromocto? Or vise versa? Seems to me that there is plenty of people coming from Oromocto to Fredericton every day.
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  #902  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2021, 3:41 PM
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Originally Posted by FreddyGuy View Post
Is it because not enough people commute from Fredericton to Oromocto? Or vise versa? Seems to me that there is plenty of people coming from Oromocto to Fredericton every day.
But CFB Gagetown is a huge employer in town. This overwhelms the amount of commuter traffic going from Oromocto to Freddy.
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  #903  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2021, 4:14 PM
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cl812 cl812 is offline
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I would speculate that there is more commuter traffic from the Freddy CA/CMA to Oromocto than vice versa, since the base is by far the largest single employer in the region (military + civilian).
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  #904  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2021, 2:45 PM
Taeolas Taeolas is offline
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I'm pretty sure this is a rarity.... NB Unemployment is lower than the natioanl average

8.8 in NB vs 9.4 nationally.

I know monthly numbers don't really mean much overall and all that stuff. But it is a nice bit of pride to be on the other side of the national average for a change.


Quote:
In New Brunswick, unemployment was down eight tenths of a percent in January to sit at 8.8%.

The provincial economy lost 2,400 net full-time positions last month, but this was offset by a gain of 3,500 net part-time positions, as well as a net reduction of 2,400 in the labour force.
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  #905  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 12:53 PM
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Average rent and average rent per square foot in Canada as of January 2021.

Average monthly rent:

1) BC - $1990/mo
2) ON - $1922/mo
3) NS - $1705/mo
4) PE - $1698/mo
5) QC - $1601/mo
6) NB - $1467/mo
7) MB - $1320/mo
8) AB - $1243/mo
9) SK - $1011/mo
10) NL - $1010/mo

The NS and PE rents are pretty high from a national perspective!
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  #906  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 1:34 PM
NB_ExistsToo NB_ExistsToo is offline
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strange how cheap $/sqft is here in NB, especially compared to every other province in Canada. I'm no guru in the real estate world, but wouldn't this seem promising to investors, as this low $/sqft is an anomaly Canada-wide and wouldn't be all that sustainable long term?
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  #907  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 1:55 PM
adamuptownsj adamuptownsj is offline
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Originally Posted by NB_ExistsToo View Post
strange how cheap $/sqft is here in NB, especially compared to every other province in Canada. I'm no guru in the real estate world, but wouldn't this seem promising to investors, as this low $/sqft is an anomaly Canada-wide and wouldn't be all that sustainable long term?
Not sure about Moncton but Fredericton has a lot of sprawling old student housing and Saint John apartments, at least the older ones, run big.

A lot of the 'affordability crisis' is people not wanting to accept one neighborhood with high rents. For example, rents have definitely gone up in the northwestern half of the South End of Saint John, but it's still dirt cheap in much of the North end and the Lower West. The lower South and Waterloo Village have seen increases but a lot of that is renovations putting vacants and substandfard housing back in the market.
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  #908  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 2:08 PM
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In Moncton, new, high-end apartments are going up like crazy. Not sure who's renting 'em, but the skyline is improving, slowly!
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  #909  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 2:33 PM
Franco401 Franco401 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamuptownsj View Post
Not sure about Moncton but Fredericton has a lot of sprawling old student housing and Saint John apartments, at least the older ones, run big.

A lot of the 'affordability crisis' is people not wanting to accept one neighborhood with high rents. For example, rents have definitely gone up in the northwestern half of the South End of Saint John, but it's still dirt cheap in much of the North end and the Lower West. The lower South and Waterloo Village have seen increases but a lot of that is renovations putting vacants and substandfard housing back in the market.
This is not a fair comparison in Fredericton. Rents have gone way up in every properly urban neighbourhood except maybe Devon.
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  #910  
Old Posted Feb 23, 2021, 3:14 PM
OliverD OliverD is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NB_ExistsToo View Post
strange how cheap $/sqft is here in NB, especially compared to every other province in Canada. I'm no guru in the real estate world, but wouldn't this seem promising to investors, as this low $/sqft is an anomaly Canada-wide and wouldn't be all that sustainable long term?
I think the primary reason for this is that because NB lacks anything resembling a truly high-density urban area, apartment sizes are generally quite large. It's typical for new construction two bedroom apartments to be in the 1200-2000 square foot range, whereas in bigger cities the typical size might be more like 700-1000 square feet.

I can't speak specifically to Saint John or Moncton but in Fredericton the density rules often promote large unit sizes because it allows developers to maximize income. Obviously though, a 1600 square foot apartment is not going to cost double an 800 square foot one, so that drives down the cost per square foot.

We are, however, starting to see new developments with smaller units and the city does seem amenable to increasing density beyond what is allowed by the current zoning rules.
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