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  #101  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2020, 5:36 PM
Djesus777 Djesus777 is offline
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Phase 2 announcement! 32 km long, 23 new stations, construction starts mid 2023, completion date 2029. Total cost of the project $10B






https://cdpqinfra.com/en/rem-est
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  #102  
Old Posted Dec 15, 2020, 10:20 PM
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tayser tayser is offline
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Which street/road/blvd is it that will take the final route into downtown? Edit: just went back to the previous page... Rene-Levesque.

Regardless, outstanding!
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  #103  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2020, 7:26 PM
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The REM is developing into a Second System that is incompatible with the first... like a smaller version of New York with the IRT and BMT/IND, or London with its shallow and deep tube lines.

Sometimes that's okay, as with Paris and the RER... if the second network serves a different purpose, like express travel across the region, and if it is compatible with mainline rail to save costs. But in Montreal the REM Est appears to be serving the exact same purpose as Metro. Rome is another city that has taken this mixed approach - Line C is not compatible with Lines A/B, and uses a cheaper technology - but everyone agrees that it's part of the same network, it has full transfers to the other lines, and it doesn't force awkward transfers to continue along the same corridor. REM East will require a transfer at Honore-Beaugrand to continue along the Sherbrooke corridor.

Also should be noted that the REM East may not even be compatible with the first phase of REM. And the documents indicate that it will not be a tram but a light metro, which means all those sections labeled as "above ground" will need to be on an elevated structure - probably similar to Skytrain in Vancouver.
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Last edited by ardecila; Dec 16, 2020 at 7:40 PM.
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  #104  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2020, 7:45 PM
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GreaterMontréal GreaterMontréal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
The REM is developing into a Second System that is incompatible with the first... like a smaller version of New York with the IRT and BMT/IND, or London with its shallow and deep tube lines.

Sometimes that's okay, as with Paris and the RER... if the second network serves a different purpose, like express travel across the region, and if it is compatible with mainline rail to save costs. But in Montreal the REM Est appears to be serving the exact same purpose as Metro. Rome is another city that has taken this mixed approach - Line C is not compatible with Lines A/B, and uses a cheaper technology - but everyone agrees that it's part of the same network, it has full transfers to the other lines, and it doesn't force awkward transfers to continue along the same corridor. REM East will require a transfer at Honore-Beaugrand to continue along the Sherbrooke corridor.

Also should be noted that the REM East may not even be compatible with the first phase of REM. And the documents indicate that it will not be a tram but a light metro, which means all those sections labeled as "above ground" will need to be on an elevated structure.
Like the original REM. I'm pretty sure they want another system as the 1st system will have a capacity problem in the long term if all the lines pass through the Mount-Royal tunnel. There will be a REM 3 in Laval, if they use the 1st system to go north towards the A-440, the Mount-Royal tunnel will be maxed out. The Pink Line couldl be based from the 2nd system.
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  #105  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 6:22 AM
jamesinclair jamesinclair is offline
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I know this isnt directly related, but are there any projects to improve transit between Montreal and Quebec?
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  #106  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 1:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamesinclair View Post
I know this isnt directly related, but are there any projects to improve transit between Montreal and Quebec?
How long do you plan to ride public transit on one trip? It's 155 miles or 249 kilometers between Montreal and Quebec, 2 hours and 41 minutes driving in light traffic, or 2 hours and 52 minutes on a VIA train. The best most public transit trains do is average around 30 mph speeds with all the stops along the way, so public transit would easily take 5-6 hours to travel that distance.

Now that public transit is set aside, VIA is looking at adding more trains to the route by adding trains to another rail corridor. Surf to to read more about it.
https://corpo.viarail.ca/en/projects...frequency-rail
By using dedicated tracks and fewer station stops, the average speeds can be much higher than even the existing train service. That would actually be an improvement over more public transit between those two cities.
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  #107  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 10:27 PM
ssiguy ssiguy is offline
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REM Phase 1 was a great idea and was built very affordably and fast. This 2nd phase is the exact opposite.

32 km for $10 billion works out to $300 million per/km with very small stations and due to much underground construction, it will take much longer to build. They could get the same length with larger stations built much quicker using an elevated Metro-type system.

Phase 1 was great value for the dollar but Phase 2 most decidedly isn't.
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  #108  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2021, 4:55 AM
jamesinclair jamesinclair is offline
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
How long do you plan to ride public transit on one trip? It's 155 miles or 249 kilometers between Montreal and Quebec, 2 hours and 41 minutes driving in light traffic, or 2 hours and 52 minutes on a VIA train. The best most public transit trains do is average around 30 mph speeds with all the stops along the way, so public transit would easily take 5-6 hours to travel that distance.
Um, Via is public transit.

Thats what Im asking about.

Quote:
Now that public transit is set aside, VIA is looking at adding more trains to the route by adding trains to another rail corridor. Surf to to read more about it.
https://corpo.viarail.ca/en/projects...frequency-rail
By using dedicated tracks and fewer station stops, the average speeds can be much higher than even the existing train service. That would actually be an improvement over more public transit between those two cities.[
Thank you.
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  #109  
Old Posted Mar 8, 2021, 7:10 AM
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Originally Posted by jamesinclair View Post
Um, Via is public transit.
Thats what Im asking about.
Thank you.
Not to debate the point forever, what does Webster's say?
Definition of transit (Entry 1 of 2)
1a(1): conveyance of persons or things from one place to another
(2): usually local transportation especially of people by public conveyance
also : vehicles or a system engaged in such transportation


VIA is not in the business of transporting passengers locally, that is the job of GO Transit, a division of Metrolinx, and Exo, officially known as Réseau de transport métropolitain, depending upon which city.

VIA is in the business of transporting passengers on a provincial and national scale.
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  #110  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2021, 5:16 AM
jamesinclair jamesinclair is offline
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
Not to debate the point forever, what does Webster's say?
Definition of transit (Entry 1 of 2)
1a(1): conveyance of persons or things from one place to another
(2): usually local transportation especially of people by public conveyance
also : vehicles or a system engaged in such transportation


VIA is not in the business of transporting passengers locally, that is the job of GO Transit, a division of Metrolinx, and Exo, officially known as Réseau de transport métropolitain, depending upon which city.

VIA is in the business of transporting passengers on a provincial and national scale.
Youll note the word "usually" is the key to that sentence.

This is the much more common and accepted definition:

Quote:
Public transport (also known as public transportation, public transit, mass transit, or simply transit) is a system of transport, in contrast to private transport, for passengers by group travel systems available for use by the general public, typically managed on a schedule, operated on established routes, and that charge a posted fee for each trip
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