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Old Posted Mar 30, 2010, 1:00 PM
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Shanghai Metro - Asia's Largest and soon to be World's Largest Metro System

Hi all,

I'm a big fan of the Shanghai Metro system, which is, as of April 10, 2010, the longest metro system in the world. I would like to share some information and pictures about the system, which is also without a doubt the fastest growing metro system in the world. All photos by me.

Current Map (click for full size)


Network Information
Started Operation: 1995 (Line 1 from Jinjiang Park to Shanghai Railway Station only
Current Lines: 11 - 8 Heavy Rail Metro Lines primarily underground or elevated (Lines 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 9, 10, 11); 3 Light Metro Lines underground or elevated (Lines 5, 6, 8)
Lines U/C: 3 - 12 (opens 2012), 13 (3 stations open 2010, remainder open 2012); 21 (opens 2012)
Extensions U/C:2 - Line 7, Shanghai University - Meilan Lake (opens 2010); Line 11, Southern extension (opens 2012)
Current Network Length: 424.7km
Number of Stations: 230 (264 if interchange stations are counted separately for each line)
Network Length by end of 2012: >500km
Longest Line: Line 2, Xujing East - Pudong International Airport- 63.8 km
Shortest Line: Line 5, Xinzhuang - Minhang Free Trade Zone - 17km
Daily Ridership: >4 million per day
Busiest Station: People's Square (Lines 1, 2, 8), 400 000 people per day
Busiest Line: Line 1, Xinzhuang - Fujin Road, 1.4 million per day
Largest Interchange Station: Century Avenue (Lines 2, 4, 6, 9)
Rolling Stock: Siemens - Lines 1, 2, 4, 11; Alstom - Lines 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 10; Bombardier - Lines 7, 9

Pictures
Line 1














Line 2










Line 3






Line 4










People's Square Station
















That's all for now, but I'm going to try and keep this page up to date with the newest information and photos. Hope you enjoyed.
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Last edited by The Chemist; Apr 11, 2010 at 1:09 AM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2010, 4:09 PM
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An incredibly easy system to use. Packed in like sardines during rush hour though (worse than anywhere else I've ever been). Lujiazui Station in particular since it's served by only one line.
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Old Posted Mar 30, 2010, 4:27 PM
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Nice. The map looks good, too. Is it all powered by overhead catenary wires or do some lines have 3rd rail?
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Old Posted Mar 30, 2010, 10:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sekkle View Post
Nice. The map looks good, too. Is it all powered by overhead catenary wires or do some lines have 3rd rail?
It's all overhead catenary - no third rail in Shanghai. They run at 1500VDC, so I guess third rail was thought to be too dangerous. Only issue with it is they have to build higher diameter tunnels to accommodate it.

I really like the new map too - nice and colourful, easy to read. It's obviously inspired by the famous Underground map, but also has a style of its own.
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Old Posted Mar 31, 2010, 4:17 AM
llamaorama llamaorama is offline
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I'm no engineer, but isn't there some critical details about third-rail power supply, voltages are limited and there's a relationship to the spacing of transformers and the amount of power drawn by each train which the designers get all figured out when they build a line.

Just a guess, maybe catenary was the more simple/optimal technology for their particular needs?

I know in Spain they have overhead power in metro tunnels, some use rigid metal bars attached to the tunnel ceiling.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 2:21 AM
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News from today:

- Shanghai Metro recorded highest ever daily ridership on April 2nd (5.6 million); expecting over 6 million/day during the Expo (May 1st - October 31st)

- Underground transfer hall between Line 1 and Line 9 at Xujiahui Station opens today

- Line 9 between Century Avenue and Central Yanggao Road opens today

- Line 2 between Guanglan Road and Pudong Airport opens tomorrow

- Line 10 expected to open by the end of the month
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 7:05 PM
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If only my city can demonstrate the same vigor for transit.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 8:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
It's all overhead catenary - no third rail in Shanghai. They run at 1500VDC, so I guess third rail was thought to be too dangerous. Only issue with it is they have to build higher diameter tunnels to accommodate it.
Nearly all metro lines in Tokyo, and many lines elsewhere in Japan, use overhead power as well. It has little to do with safety. It is done so that trains from commuter lines can be through-routed across town in the metro tunnels. This increases efficiency and cuts down on transfers. I wonder if Shanghai has any such schemes in place or planned, as that might help to explain the use of 1500vdc catenary.

For example, in Tokyo, trains on the Keisei line (a private commuter line) can enter the Toei Metro Asakusa line at Oshiage; from there trains can proceed onto the Keikyu line (another private commuter line) at Shinagawa. This allows some trains to go directly from Narita Airport all the way to Haneda Airport with no transfers.

Every line in Tokyo (except for three) has some sort of interlining with commuter lines. The three exceptions are the two oldest lines (Ginza and Marunouchi) and the Oedo line, all of which use smaller rolling stock and smaller tunnels that would be incompatible with surface lines. Incidentally, all three of these lines draw their power from 3rd rail.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 9:17 PM
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Cool! What a city.

Did he (guy in white shirt) insulted you? He looks really angry at you.

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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 10:32 PM
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wow, kind of weak on ethnic diversity in the stations.
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Old Posted Apr 7, 2010, 10:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pesto View Post
wow, kind of weak on ethnic diversity in the stations.
No different than you'd probably find in Metros in other Asian countries. China simply isn't as obviously ethnically diverse as Canada/US/Europe/Australia. There are many ethnic minorities here, but most of them look similar to the Han majority, and in most places they are heavily outnumbered by the Han.
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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 12:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
Nearly all metro lines in Tokyo, and many lines elsewhere in Japan, use overhead power as well. It has little to do with safety. It is done so that trains from commuter lines can be through-routed across town in the metro tunnels. This increases efficiency and cuts down on transfers. I wonder if Shanghai has any such schemes in place or planned, as that might help to explain the use of 1500vdc catenary.
May not be useful. China's railways are powered by 25 kV 50 Hz instead.
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Old Posted Apr 8, 2010, 4:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
No different than you'd probably find in Metros in other Asian countries. China simply isn't as obviously ethnically diverse as Canada/US/Europe/Australia. There are many ethnic minorities here, but most of them look similar to the Han majority, and in most places they are heavily outnumbered by the Han.
Maybe that'll change if tens of millions of chinese move to other parts of the globe, and foreigners take their place.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2010, 1:14 AM
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More News:

Line 10 opens for trial (9am-4pm only) operation tomorrow, except for the stretch between Shanghai Zoo and Hongqiao Railway Station. It will be fully operational before the Expo begins on May 1st.

New photos:

Line 1 Platform at Xujiahui


Transfer Corridor between Line 1 and 9 at Xujiahui


Expo Advertisement


Line 9 Ticket Hall - Xujiahui


Station Art, Xujiahui. The light blue line at the top of the wall indicates this is the Line 9 section of the station. All underground stations are colour-coded with the colour of the Line they are on.


Line 9 Platform at Xujiahui


Inside Line 9 Train. Note the LCD display at the end of the car.




Line 9 Platform at Century Avenue


Century Avenue - with 4 lines (2, 4, 6, 9), it is the largest interchange station in the system. Note the directional arrows on the floor indicating where to go for each line.


Looking up at the Line 6 Platform at Century Avenue


Going up the escalator from Line 4 at Century Avenue


In-station signage examples:




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Old Posted Apr 9, 2010, 1:33 AM
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I really, really wish Tokyo trains would install plastic dividers like you see on the right of this pic, separating the end seat from the area next to the car door. Whenever I get the end seat, people rest their backs against the side of the seat, and bags/jackets always smash into my face. This can't happen on the Shanghai trains thanks to that clear barrier. Good thinking on whoever thought this feature up.
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2010, 8:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn View Post


I really, really wish Tokyo trains would install plastic dividers like you see on the right of this pic, separating the end seat from the area next to the car door. Whenever I get the end seat, people rest their backs against the side of the seat, and bags/jackets always smash into my face. This can't happen on the Shanghai trains thanks to that clear barrier. Good thinking on whoever thought this feature up.
I'm not sure where the idea originated from, but the dividers found in Singapore, London, Hong Kong and elsewhere appears to offer more protection than the ones found in Shanghai (off the the top of my head not all the rolling stock has a divider which is bizarre considering the youth of the system).

At least the newer stock in Shanghai has a divider - the brand new stock on the Paris Metro has no divider whatsoever (although the seat styling is far more attractive than anything in Asia outside Japan).
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Old Posted Apr 9, 2010, 10:38 PM
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Originally Posted by The Chemist View Post
No different than you'd probably find in Metros in other Asian countries. China simply isn't as obviously ethnically diverse as Canada/US/Europe/Australia. There are many ethnic minorities here, but most of them look similar to the Han majority, and in most places they are heavily outnumbered by the Han.
Yes, they have cities where you can feel you're in the country, anglo cities are just one multicultural mess, they don't have their own identity anymore, but the chinese cities have.
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Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 3:57 AM
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Originally Posted by JDRCRASH View Post
Maybe that'll change if tens of millions of chinese move to other parts of the globe, and foreigners take their place.
Just for your information, there are about 40 million people of Chinese descent in other parts of the world. Migration *into* China will probably become significant in the next few decades; this is a country which is a lot more receptive to outsiders than Japan or Korea or even much of Europe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chrissib View Post
Yes, they have cities where you can feel you're in the country, anglo cities are just one multicultural mess, they don't have their own identity anymore, but the chinese cities have.
What do you mean, those cities don't have their identity anymore? New York is defined by its diversity just as it's defined by its yellow taxis and Times Square. Same goes with London, Toronto, Sydney, and so on.
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Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 4:13 AM
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Interesting. Kinda makes the north american transit expansion look really bad .

I find it interesting also, because China is expanding highways like crazy and promoting the American lifestyle of a suburban house and driving everywhere. So I hope that this transit expansion continues to attract riders and that transit use does not start to decline.
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Old Posted Apr 10, 2010, 1:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miketoronto View Post
Interesting. Kinda makes the north american transit expansion looks really bad .

I find it interesting also, because China is expanding highways like crazy and promoting the American lifestyle of a suburban house and driving everywhere. So I hope that this transit expansion continues to attract riders and that transit use does not start to decline.
China is not really promoting the American lifestyle of suburban houses and driving everywhere. Only the really rich can afford such a lifestyle (car ownership is still far more of a luxury here than it is in North America, with costs far higher as a percentage of average income), and even most suburban developments are still FAR higher density than anything seen in North America, with (at least in Shanghai) good connections to the metro system. And although the government is expanding highways significantly, this is only part of a complete modernization of the country's infrastructure that also includes intercity HSR to every single provincial capital city at very least, and metros in a large number of cities across the country. It's going to be a long time, if ever, before road-based transportation takes over from rail-based as the prime method of transportation for the general public.
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