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Old Posted May 28, 2014, 5:31 PM
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National Capital Region Beer News

Gatineau's beer-loving 'Festbière' continues to grow

Vito Pilieci, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: May 20, 2014, Last Updated: May 28, 2014 1:21 PM EDT


The annual Gatineau Festibière is ready to open its doors to the masses at Jacques Cartier Park this weekend, featuring 55 vendors, 350 different beers to sample and 15 workshops on various topics to educate people about beer. The Citizen’s Vito Pilieci sits down with Mario D’Eer, one of the events key organizers, to find out what’s in store.

Q You’re expecting around 40,000 people to show up this year, which is more than the 38,000 you had last year. How else has the event expanded when compared to last year’s offering?

A It’s a little bit bigger than last year. We have a couple of new breweries like Lac St. Jean (a well-known Belgian-style brewer), and the theme is myths and realities about beer.

Q Why ‘myths and realities about beer’? What topics will you be discussing?

A For example, the beer belly. No one ever talks about ‘wine belly’, ‘cheese belly’ or ‘chocolate belly’ everyone only talks about beer belly. It’s a reflection of the prejudice that beer has compared to wine. We’ll be talking about things like is dark beer stronger than pale beer, or what’s an older beverage beer or wine.

Q What about drinking beer in bottles? Nobody would ever drink wine straight from the bottle.

A It shows the hierarchy of wine and beer when you compare how people drink it. It’s a fact of life. That’s the way it is. From a tasting point of view, there’s a big difference between drinking from a bottle and drinking from a glass. When you drink from a glass you are smelling at the same time. The fact that you don’t smell it, you don’t get the nose. So, your perception of the flavour is not the same.

Q There is talk about a beer ‘throwdown’ between Microbrasserie Gainsbourg (a microbrewery co-owned by D’Eer) Les Brassuers Du Temps (Gatineau’s founding microbrewery) and a third surprise brewery?

A We will have a battle between BDT, Gainsbourg and a guest brewer along with some Montebello cheese which will be paired with each beer. The people in the crowd will vote which is the best. The fact is all three will be good. They will be different. And some people will prefer one and some people will prefer the other, that’s the way life is. But, we will have the battle of the breweries.

Q It seems like there are more people talking about the Festibière this year. Have you noticed?

A The market for micro breweries is still very young. We are being taken seriously this year, more so than in previous years. We feel that now we have more credibility. There is something different this year, there is more excitement from people. It’s like an annual event for people, they celebrate the first beer festival of the season.

Q There was talk that the reason organizers picked Jacques Cartier Park is because of its proximity to Ontario and how that help to attract more people from Ottawa.

A Events on the Gatineau side, don’t usually attract Ontarians. It’s a reality that we’ve faced since the beginning. The Ontarians who come bring friends, we know that. That’s what brings new people to the festival, word of mouth. As far as publicity, we still have a challenge there. We think that the people in Ontario that want to discover new beer will have tonnes to discover at Festibière.

The festival will take place Friday through Sunday at Jacques Cartier Park in Gatineau. Tickets are $15 each, a three-day pass costs $30.

Vpilieci@ottawacitizen.com
Twitter: Vpilieci

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...tinues-to-grow
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Old Posted Jun 11, 2014, 11:01 PM
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Ottawa to consider expanded sampling at some craft breweries

Matthew Pearson, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: June 11, 2014, Last Updated: June 11, 2014 4:30 PM EDT


Fans of Ottawa’s burgeoning craft beer industry may soon have a chance to enjoy larger samples of their favourite local brew.

Mayor Jim Watson served notice at the end of Wednesday’s council meeting that he intends to bring a motion forward at the next meeting in support of local brewers who are seeking a ‘by the glass’ licence from the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario.

Such a licence allows Ontario wineries and breweries that already hold a manufacturer’s licence from the AGCO to sell and serve their own wine or beer to customers for consumption in single servings at their manufacturing site under certain conditions.

“It seems like a good idea,” Watson told reporters after the council meeting.

According to the mayor’s motion, operators requesting a “by the glass” license are exempt from the public advertising process and must instead obtain a resolution from their municipal council indicating the support of the local community.

But due to the restricted council meeting schedule in the summer and fall months, the motion says it is “deemed desirable to proactively provide support to existing manufacturers that with to apply” between now and the end of 2014.

Watson’s office has already received requests from two local microbreweries: Stittsville’s Covered Bridge Brewing and Bicycle Craft Brewery on Industrial Road.

John van Dyk of Covered Bridge Brewing said he doesn’t want to turn his operation into a pub, but rather be allowed to serve larger samples when he’s giving a tour or hosting a beer and food pairing course.

“It’s to enhance that part of the brewery,” he said. “It’s not to allow us to be like a pub.”

The current rules, van Dyk explained, allow him to serve a maximum of four ounces in samples of his beer, which include five main flavours of brew and three seasonal offerings.

Under a “by the glass” licence he’d be able to serve up to a maximum of 12 ounces, and customers would be allowed to take the samples with them during a tour, as opposed to having to stay in the brewery’s retail area.

Covered Bridge submitted its application to the AGCO after securing the support of the local city councillor, only to later learn the application requires the entire city council’s endorsement.

Council will consider the motion at its June 25 meeting.

mpearson@ottawacitizen.com
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http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...raft-breweries
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  #3  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2014, 12:13 AM
EdFromOttawa EdFromOttawa is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketphish View Post
Ottawa to consider expanded sampling at some craft breweries

Matthew Pearson, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: June 11, 2014, Last Updated: June 11, 2014 4:30 PM EDT


Fans of Ottawa’s burgeoning craft beer industry may soon have a chance to enjoy larger samples of their favourite local brew.

Mayor Jim Watson served notice at the end of Wednesday’s council meeting that he intends to bring a motion forward at the next meeting in support of local brewers who are seeking a ‘by the glass’ licence from the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario.

Such a licence allows Ontario wineries and breweries that already hold a manufacturer’s licence from the AGCO to sell and serve their own wine or beer to customers for consumption in single servings at their manufacturing site under certain conditions.

“It seems like a good idea,” Watson told reporters after the council meeting.

According to the mayor’s motion, operators requesting a “by the glass” license are exempt from the public advertising process and must instead obtain a resolution from their municipal council indicating the support of the local community.

But due to the restricted council meeting schedule in the summer and fall months, the motion says it is “deemed desirable to proactively provide support to existing manufacturers that with to apply” between now and the end of 2014.

Watson’s office has already received requests from two local microbreweries: Stittsville’s Covered Bridge Brewing and Bicycle Craft Brewery on Industrial Road.

John van Dyk of Covered Bridge Brewing said he doesn’t want to turn his operation into a pub, but rather be allowed to serve larger samples when he’s giving a tour or hosting a beer and food pairing course.

“It’s to enhance that part of the brewery,” he said. “It’s not to allow us to be like a pub.”

The current rules, van Dyk explained, allow him to serve a maximum of four ounces in samples of his beer, which include five main flavours of brew and three seasonal offerings.

Under a “by the glass” licence he’d be able to serve up to a maximum of 12 ounces, and customers would be allowed to take the samples with them during a tour, as opposed to having to stay in the brewery’s retail area.

Covered Bridge submitted its application to the AGCO after securing the support of the local city councillor, only to later learn the application requires the entire city council’s endorsement.

Council will consider the motion at its June 25 meeting.

mpearson@ottawacitizen.com
mpearson78

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...raft-breweries
Gah... byzantine north american liquor laws.... come to Europe where this is actually handled well. Free up the alcohol, this isn't prohibition. Let the breweries sell how they want, when they want. Good for business, good for prices.
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Old Posted Jun 18, 2014, 5:32 PM
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Craft beer lovers roll out all the stops for Ontario Craft Beer Week

Vito Pilieci, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: June 18, 2014, Last Updated: June 18, 2014 1:07 PM EDT


With the trend of collaborations increasing and the popularity of Saison-style beers soaring, Mill Street Brewing Co. has partnered with Brothers Beer Bistro to created a special brew in honour of Ontario Craft Beer Week.

Dubbed My Darlin’ Lemon Thyme, the beer was created after extensive consultations between the two businesses. They ultimately decided to create the unconventional beer, which uses a Belgian yeast, peppercorns, lemon balm and thyme to give it its nifty flavour profile.

Adam Rader, head brewer at Mill Street Ottawa, said he really wanted to make a beer that could be served in hot summer weather.

“It’s a summer saison. It’s clean, refreshing and an absolutely enjoyable beer,” said Rader, adding he was particularly proud of how the collaboration came out. “This is the first time we’ve ever brewed with lemon balm. It’s also the first time we’ve ever done a collaboration in Ottawa.”

For Brothers Beer Bistro, the collaboration was natural. The restaurant has long prided itself on offering a large selection of beer from microbrews across Canada. As many of its taps are local, adding a brew made especially for them during craft beer week just made sense. The event, now in its fifth year, celebrates craft beer with more than 300 events in more than 100 venues that encourage Ontarians to drink local brews.

“The beer geeks are out and about and they are looking for craft offerings,” said Patrick Asselin, co-founder of Brothers.

The special offering helps to underscore what the bistro is all about, he says. “We were looking at just how popular wine pairing and tasting was getting and we just thought, ‘Why can’t we take our love for beer and really take this to the next level?’ “

Brothers has 16 taps offering beers in styles to suit every palate. Asselin said he and co-founder Nick Ringuette, set out in 2011 to create a gathering place for beer buffs that offered a relaxed atmosphere and great food. They also wanted to ensure that beer lovers were getting the best experience possible and set out to educate their staff on the various styles of beer.

All servers and bar staff at Brothers are encouraged to read “the Bible,” a large black binder full of tasting notes and food pairings for every beer every poured at the restaurant. Educating the staff helps them to better serve today’s customers, who are becoming more knowledgeable about brews.

Mill Street brewed about 1,000 litres of My Darlin’ Lemon Thyme. The beer will be on tap at both Brothers Beer Bistro and Mill Street Ottawa until it runs out. Here’s a run down on the new beer, as well as notes on two other brews available at Brothers:

My Darlin’ Lemon Thyme
Brewed by: Mill Street Brew Pub Ottawa
Score: 79
Alcohol By Volume (ABV): 6.5 per cent
International Bitterness Units (IBUs): 15-20

The beer pours a hazy amber colour with a thick, off-white head that lasts and leaves lacing. Off the bat, the scent of lemon tea and citrus wafts from the glass. The taste is of sweet lemon, plus somewhat muted but familiar Belgian flavours like banana and spice. The finish features a thyme punch that lingers. It’s not like a classic Saison, which skews towards sour. However, it offers a refreshing and unique flavour profile that given it’s higher alcohol level is surprisingly easy to drink.

Moroccan Brown Ale
Brewed by: Spearhead Brewing Co.
Score: 77
ABV: 6 per cent
IBU: 35

This dark, crisp drinking ale suits itself to pairings with lamb or beef. The beer pours a clear brown colour with a thick white head. It smells of spices. The flavour is prominently cinnamon, which is then substituted by sweet roasted malts. It’s a unique spin on the timeless brown style of beer that is best suited to those with more adventurous palates.

Anti-Gravity Light Ale
Brewed by: Flying Monkeys Craft Brewery
Score: 75
ABV: 4 per cent
IBUs: 12

The beer pours a clear straw yellow colour with very little head. Scents of green apple and sweet malt waft from the glass. One sip and you’ll realize this is a very accessible, easy-to-drink ale that will appeal to even the most uninitiated of craft beer drinkers. The taste is clean, malty and inoffensive. It’s one for patio lovers everywhere.

vpilieci@ottawacitizen.com
Twitter.com/vpilieci

http://ottawacitizen.com/life/food/c...raft-beer-week
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Old Posted Jul 28, 2014, 4:37 PM
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Good thing brewing in capital, Algonquin dean says

Elizabeth Howell, OBJ
Published on July 25, 2014


Local craft beer is a trend in Ottawa, with establishments ranging from the Clocktower Brew Pub to the Mill Street Brewery offering it in their restaurants, and providers such as Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. and Big Rig Brewery selling it direct to consumers.

This is one of the things on which Jim Kyte, the new dean of Algonquin College’s school of hospitality and tourism, has his eye for future program development.

“We are looking at starting a program for brewmasters and microdistillers, certainly, down the road and also looking at industry partners to participate with us in creating these types of programs,” Mr. Kyte said in a recent interview with OBJ.

It’s part of the creative thinking that has brought Mr. Kyte through his career. He spent 13 seasons in the NHL, including one in Ottawa in 1992-93, the Senators’ first season back in the league. An automobile accident ended his playing days in 1998, but he quickly poured his energies into sports tourism.

In 2002, he created the sport business management program at Algonquin College, then progressed in 2007 to academic chair of marketing and management studies in its business school. He also found time to help bring the 2009 world junior hockey championship to Ottawa as co-director of the volunteer division.

“I’ve always been involved in the hospitality industry,” he said. “It’s really what professional sports is: it’s professional entertainment. You’re dealing with clientele and you’re dealing with the fans. You want to put a good product on the ice.”

And that’s the same thing he wants to offer at Algonquin. While students are the clients, the true customer is industry, Mr. Kyte said. An “active” advisory committee helps keep Algonquin’s hospitality school on track for future programming.

Among the committee’s recommendations is an emphasis on “work-integrated” learning, in which students do apprenticeships to gain industry experience even before graduating, with events such as Bluesfest and the Ottawa Wine and Food Festival, for example.

When asked about where Algonquin could fill in the gaps in Ottawa’s tourism industry, Mr. Kyte said as a new dean he is still learning that himself. But there are industries in high demand across Canada that also have relevance locally, he said.

“We’re looking at, for new programming down the line, the importance of retirement homes and the importance of food supply in terms of food science,” Mr. Kyte said.

Anecdotally, as a father of three teenagers, he has observed them carefully looking at the labels on what they eat. The wider trend is spurring Algonquin to look at ways to integrate this type of awareness into a degree in food science, although the ideas are still being fleshed out, he said.

Ottawa is generally hitting a high point in sports tourism, he added, with the new RedBlacks CFL franchise making its home debut at TD Place this month. The team’s agreement with the league also will bring the Grey Cup game to the city.

But the key is making sure the region’s infrastructure is up to the task. Ottawa could use more direct flights to Europe, Mr. Kyte said, beyond its existing routes to locations such as London and Frankfurt. And two hotels downtown – the Holiday Inn and the Minto Suites Hotel – are being converted for other uses, which will drain an already shallow pool of hotel spaces in Ottawa’s centre.

“To attract international events, you need more hotels,” he said, calling for flagship franchises such as the Ritz-Carlton or Four Seasons to come to Ottawa.

He sees these elements as all part of the package that showcases tourism – and his focus area of sports tourism – to the world.

“In the end, it creates jobs, pays for infrastructure or creates the infrastructure not just for sports tourism, but tourism altogether,” he said.

http://www.obj.ca/Local/2014-07-25/a...in-dean-says/1
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Old Posted Aug 5, 2014, 1:52 AM
citydwlr citydwlr is offline
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An article in EQ Journal regarding Big Rig, mentioned that they will be opening a second location in the East End (at Gloucester Centre), as well as new warehouse space in Kanata to increase production:

Quote:
One of their biggest problems so far has been handling the volume of people coming in the door—2,300 visitors just in their first three days of operation. Mr. Phillips says, “I got my hand slapped. I was inviting members of the media to come to the pub for a tour, doing interviews in the building and in studio and Angelis (he is the founding partner with restaurant operations experience) asked me to STOP.”

The other challenge they have is brewing enough beer to meet not only their own demand but their licensees’ and LCBO’s as well. Big Rig has recently leased 16,000 sq. ft. of warehouse space in the Kanata North Business Park (at 103 Schneider Road, just off Carling Avenue) where they plan to brew beer, launch a tall can, do taste tours, retail merchandise as well as beer, and, if they can successfully navigate Ottawa’s byzantine zoning rules, host events and serve food. Increased production is also required because they are opening a second restaurant in the Gloucester Centre where they’ve just signed a lease.

They currently employ 70 people in their restaurant and will add a similar number once their second location begins operating in Ottawa’s east end. The Brewery employs 8 more and this will grow depending on what Ottawa planners decide to let them do in their new warehouse location.
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Old Posted Aug 13, 2014, 2:08 AM
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Ottawa's newest microbrewery finally opens doors, promptly sells out

Vito Pilieci, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: August 12, 2014, Last Updated: August 12, 2014 9:46 PM EDT


After years of planning, and a massively successful Kickstarter campaign, Dominion City Brewing Co. finally opened it doors to the masses this past Saturday, and then watched as thirsty customers bought up everything that they had to offer.

“People kept commenting, ‘We’ve been waiting a long time for a brewery to open in the east end,” said Josh McJannett, one of the firm’s three co-founders. “It was an awesome first day. Everybody got a high five on the way in.”

The brewery is capable of producing 700-litre batches of beer. It sold more than 620 litres on Saturday in growlers, large glass jugs capable of transporting just shy of two litres of beer. It also prepared several kegs for four Ottawa area bars that specialize in craft beer offerings. The kegs were dropped off on Friday, and four have already been emptied and replaced.

It’s a good problem to have, admits McJannett and another co-founder Alex Monk, who both believe that if they take pride in their offerings and continue to brew with high quality and local ingredients “that hopefully the crowds will keep coming.”

“The community is so tight and the customers are dedicated. You have to show that you care,” said McJannett.

Dominion City will source as much of its ingredients locally as it can, he said. The Earl Grey tea it uses in its Earl Grey Marmalade Saison comes from local coffee/tea house Bridgehead. He describes the business as a “community” startup, thanks to a successful crowd funding campaign that raised $19,000 for the fledgling brewery and support from family and friends along the way.

The trio have been planning the brewery for the past two years after growing a home-brew hobby into an obsession. The name Dominion City is a play on the country’s old status as the “Dominion of Canada”, and Ottawa’s role as the capital.

Seeing the business finally open its doors is something that seems a little surreal, they admit.

For the time being, the three will maintain their day jobs while expanding the brewery. Retail hours at the Canotek Road location will only be held on Saturdays.

The new brewery’s opening happened one week before Saturday’s National Capital Beer Festival, which will see dozens of the city’s top microbreweries converge outside Ottawa City Hall to showcase their offerings. While McJannett would have loved to be part of the festival, the brewery needs to focus on increasing production to meet early demand. He said Dominion City will likely participate next year.

Ottawa is quickly becoming a mecca for craft beer lovers. The city and its surrounding area will feature as many as 24 different microbreweries by year’s end.

For the time being, Dominion City has three beers it will be offering on a regular basis. The beers have all been created by the brewery’s three founders after years of home brewing and playing with various recipes. Here are a few details on those brews:

Town & Country Blonde Ale

Score: 78

Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 %

International Bitterness Units (IBUs): 15

A smooth, easy drinking and very accessible offering that is sure to please even those who are a bit shy when being offered unfamiliar beers. The beer pours a deep, clear straw colour with a thin white head. The beer smells of sweet malt. Flavour is that of a well balanced beer that finishes with a hint of bitterness.

Earl Grey Marmalade Saison

Score: 80

ABV: 5.5 %

IBU: 21

This is a unique twist on a massively popular style of beer. Each batch uses more than five cases of oranges. The flavour isn’t lost in the beer, which is an accomplishment considering that fruit additions to beer usually disappear entirely in the finished beer. Although the Bridgehead Earl Grey is hard to detect in the final product. The beer pours a hazy dark straw colour with a thin white head. It smells of citrus, banana and clove. The flavour is what you would expect from a saison: peppery, slightly sour and citrus-like. The orange flavour helps to round out the beer. It’s an easy drinking offering on a hot summer day.

Two Flags IPA

Score: 78

ABV: 7 %

IBU: 63

Don’t let the higher IBUs scare you off — this beer is better balanced than many would think. While that may turn off some IPA fans, who look for that bitter hop kick in the teeth, it leads to an easy drinking beer that even the less adventurous beer drinker will likely enjoy. The beer pours a hazy copper colour. Aromas include pine, brown sugar and citrus. The flavour is malt sweetness and slight sugary undertones, finished by a slight hoppy bitterness.

Vpilieci@ottawacitizen.com
Twitter.com: Vpilieci

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...ptly-sells-out
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Old Posted Aug 13, 2014, 4:10 AM
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Great to see a successful first day for these guys. Starting up an operation like this must be a grueling labour of love.

To bad the province has no interest in relaxing their 80-year-old post-prohibition laws to make it easier for operations like this to compete with the monopoly running the Beer Store.

Craft beer is also big business, and good for the local and greater economy. Read an article about Beau's Brewery the other day I was surprised to learn that the father-son startup now employs 100 people in a town of 2,000.

Without it, can you imagine what shape that town would be in?
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Old Posted Aug 14, 2014, 11:21 PM
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National Capital Beer Festival kicks off for its third year

Vito Pilieci, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: August 14, 2014, Last Updated: August 14, 2014 6:36 PM EDT


Toasting beer as the “universal language,” Israel’s ambassador to Canada helped kick off the third annual National Capital Beer Festival at City Hall on Thursday.

While the festival won’t officially open its doors until Friday afternoon, organizers mingled with politicians and other VIPs on the festival grounds Thursday morning to celebrate the opening.

Ambassador Rafael Barak congratulated organizers, welcomed one of Israel’s premier breweries, Alexander Brewing, to the festival and said despite religion, creed or colour, beer is something that is enjoyed by all cultures around the world.

“It’s not a coincidence that beer is found in every country and every culture around the world,” said Barak. “It was created 6,000 years ago by the Sumerians in the Middle East. Beer is a universal language. It brings people together.”

This year, the festival is expanding to three days from two. It runs Friday through to Sunday at Marion Dewar Plaza, just outside Ottawa City Hall. About 30 breweries will take part, compared to last year when only about a dozen breweries participated.

The event is expected to attract as many as 20,000 people over the weekend.

“We are ridiculously excited,” said J.P. Fournier, founder of Ottawa’s Turtle Island Brewery Co. and one of the festival organizers. “This has continued to grow since Day 1.”

Also at the event was Ottawa South MPP John Fraser, who said Ontario’s boom in craft breweries isn’t just beneficial for the taste buds of beer lovers, it’s creating a boom in beer tourism that no one expected.

“It’s not just about beer and drinking beer. It’s attracting people from different regions and from across the province,” he said. “Craft beer is just exploding in this city. You read every day about someone else taking the plunge.”

Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson said the festival is perfect because the city is trying to encourage more community events to use the space. He said the festival is a reason for Ottawa to be proud as word of the booming craft beer scene in the nation’s capital is beginning to grab the attention of beer lovers everywhere. By the end of the 2014, it is estimated that there will be as many as 24 craft breweries operating in and around Ottawa.

Vpilieci@ottawacitizen.com
Twitter.com/vpilieci

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...its-third-year
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Old Posted Sep 27, 2014, 2:36 PM
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Ottawa is hopped up about craft beer

Chris Lackner, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: September 27, 2014, Last Updated: September 27, 2014 8:04 AM EDT


If you brew it, they will come and probably drink you dry.

That’s the lesson Ottawans have been teaching would-be craft brewers. And they’ve been paying strict attention. It’s no coincidence that at least seven new microbreweries have either recently opened or are set to launch before the end of the year.

Case in point is Bicycle Craft Brewery, which opened Sept. 20 on Industrial Avenue. Co-owners Fariborz and Laura Behzadi point to local “trailblazers” such as Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co. and Kichesippi Beer Co. as an inspiration for smaller brewers like themselves.

“They showed us the potential for a small brewery with a great product and good business plan,” Fariborz says. They also proved this city had an appetite for quality craft beer.

“There was this myth that you couldn’t sell craft beer in Ottawa,” says Steve Beauchesne, Beau’s co-founder and CEO. “We’ve proven that to be completely false. And this tidal wave of new breweries is a real testament to how supportive Ottawa has been of the craft scene… There are not a lot of cities in North America that are this supportive of their local breweries.”

Elie Dagher, co-owner of Waller St. Brewing, which is scheduled to open in October, says opening a microbrewery is still a “bold move,” but past success in the market has removed some of the “hesitation.” He links the popularity of craft beer to the wider consumer trend toward all things local, from produce to locally-owned restaurants.

“Consuming for the sake of consuming is gone,” says his partner and co-owner Marc-André Chainey. “Different people have different tastes. To me, the whole thing about craft beer is to tell people to try different beers. See where it takes you. Stop drinking the beer you used to steal from your father just because that’s the beer that you’re used to.”

The words roll of the tongue off the 29-year-old Chainey. Spend a few minutes with him and you’ll agree that he should be crowned Ottawa’s “Philosopher King of Craft Beer.” He can teach you how to brew — or argue how beer shaped civilization and human history. He can sell you an IPA, or rifle off facts about scientific breakthroughs stemming from beer.

Waller St. customers looking for an earful will find Chainey a patient, passionate teacher. They just need to find the semi-hidden staircase to the Prohibition-themed brewery, located below the Lunenburg Pub & Bar, which Dagher owns. Housed in an 1868 heritage building, their 1,000-square-foot basement brewery and retail space is even rumoured to have a ghost.

For microbreweries, personality and local character are the weapons of choice when battling the corporate behemoths like Molson and Labatt.

“They want to know the person selling the beer — people like the story” behind it, Chainey says. “I can tell them exactly what’s in the beer, where it came from, how I made it. If you walk over, I can teach you how to brew beer. I’m happy to do that.”

Waller St. will launch with three distinct beer styles, but Chainey says their small size will allow the brewery to be “nimble and quick” in responding to patrons’ tastes and requests.

Chainey is also a bit of a mad beer scientist. His path to building a brewery — echoed in that of Bicycle Craft’s founders — is anchored in Ottawa’s vibrant home-brewing scene.

“There is a very active, very present home-brewing community here,” Chainey says. “And that’s where craft brewers come from — and that’s where craft beer consumers also come from.”

The local brewery bonanza is propelled by the fact that Ottawa is a government, high-tech and university town. Due to the science and technology involved, Chainey says home brewers often come from a higher-educated portion of the population.

“It’s a very rewarding hobby,” he says. “You can rival big breweries right at home in your basement … All it takes is dedication and attention to detail.” Not surprisingly, those same ingredients are also the foundation of a successful microbrewery.

The Behzadis’ dream of opening Bicycle Craft stemmed from four years of home brewing. “We enjoyed it so much that we decided to make some beer we could share with everyone,” Laura explains.

Josh McJannett of the recently launched Dominion City Brewing Co. credits Ottawa’s craft-beer success stories to a focus on two things: quality and product availability. In the past, microbrewery startups would spread themselves too thin. “For a time, local small batch didn’t necessarily resonate with people” in terms of quality, he says. “Ottawa is becoming a national capital of craft beer.”

Microbreweries could also make Ottawa a mecca for craft-beer tourism. Ian Faris is president and CEO of the Ottawa Chamber of Commerce and the former head of the Brewers Association of Canada. He says the city’s sudsy entrepreneurs are creating both indirect and direct financial benefits — from capital expenditures to supporting new restaurants and special events like the National Capital Craft Beer Festival and The Brewery Market.

Where a corporate behemoth like Molson might employ one local sales rep, a new microbrewery could create up to five full-time jobs, Chainey says.

Craft-beer purveyors also include contract brewers, like HogsBack Brewing Co. (which brews out of Broadhead), to brew pubs such as the Big Rig Brewery & Kitchen.

Ottawa’s navigability is also a plus. A trip between two Toronto microbreweries might take more than 45 minutes via car or public transit. Here, craft lovers can make the rounds of brewers within the city limits in an afternoon.

Brad Campeau is even making a living at it. His craft-beer delivery service, Brew Donkey, is approaching its one-year anniversary. Since he launched, the number of breweries in the Ottawa-Gatineau region — including pending brewery openings — has essentially doubled. Campeau initially offered a monthly microbrewery tour as an afterthought. Three months in, overwhelmed by demand, he made his tour weekly, and plans to offer up to three tours a week beginning next spring.

“We are bringing people to the breweries not just to make money for ourselves, but to raise awareness of craft brewing in Ottawa,” he says, noting that many of his delivery customers started with a tour.

With increased competition comes the potential for market saturation. But Beau’s Beauchesne thinks the Ottawa market is nowhere near capacity.

“The entire (craft) industry — roughly five per cent in Ontario — could double and still be less than the import market,” he says. “Every brewery I’ve talked to does not have trouble selling everything they make in the Ottawa area.

“Every time someone opens, people kind of gather around and say, ‘Is this the one, are there too many?’ (Then they sell) out in the first day and they are scrambling to make more.”

Beauchesne says one hurdle facing newbies is fleeting novelty. “Beau’s had three years to be ‘the new brewery’ before Kich,” he says. “Now you get to be the new brewery for a day and then someone else is opening their doors. … Their honeymoon period is a lot shorter.”

But freshman microbrewers are toasting one another, citing a spirit of “collaboration,” according to the owners of Waller St. and Bicycle Craft. Increased awareness of one craft beer bolsters the profile of the general scene.

“Everyone’s in the spirit of ‘a rising tide floats all boats’ and there is a lot of room to grow,” McJannett says.

Craft-brew drinkers like their variety. It’s not like the old days where people stuck with their favourite beer. The way craft-beer lovers consume plays to diversity.

“With craft beer, you always want to try something new,” Fariborz says. “The way each brewer makes each style of beer is different.”

The current scale of growth is manageable, Faris says. “We are nowhere near saturation now … (but) there are only so many taps at the bars and restaurants, and they tend to be the focal point for selling craft beer.”

That’s why Campeau says the key to success is a neighbourhood retail location. Retail spaces are a necessity — thanks to the LCBO and The Beer Store’s regulated monopolies. Brewers that embrace their surrounding community will flourish.

As an example of that kind of outreach, Campeau points to an August film screening hosted by Beyond the Pale. People will support a local brewery in the same way local bakers have been supported for centuries, he explains.

The ever-expanding Beau’s has always “struggled to keep up with demand,” Beauchesne says.

But it has always prioritized Ottawa-area customers first if the beer supply ever runs short. Their business plan involves expanding only within one day’s drive of the brewery and “keeping the beer close to home.” The company’s beer is now available across Eastern Ontario and Toronto, and the company shipped its first order to New York this month. It plans to expand to Quebec in February.

The secret to Beau’s success? “The most important thing is that we were different — not just for Ottawa but for all of Ontario,” Beauchesne says. “We chose styles that were unique and hard to find. We decided to go organic.”

Beau’s also takes pride in sponsoring local events, and supporting the community, having contributed $600,000 to various charities, he explains. They expect to raise $80,000 for charity from this year’s annual Oktoberfest event alone.

“My advice to a new brewery is to focus their efforts on being different. There are so many unexplored style and innovative things you can do with beer. Don’t go out and try to re-create someone else’s beer. Go out and do things no one else has done before.”

Waller St., for example, is betting on two things to help it stand apart from the pack: its location in the densely-populated market area, and its “speakeasy” feel and Prohibition theme with beer names such as Moonlight Porter and Bootleg Blonde. They are a production facility and retail shop, but patrons will be able to sample four-ounce glasses of beer at the old wooden bar. The owner’s long-term goal is even more unique: adding a craft distillery to the mix.

The people at Bicycle Craft are also already unwittingly taking Beauchesne’s hyper-local, “be unique” message to heart. In December, they plan to host a chocolate and beer-pairing event, with other food pairings planned in the future. They plan to display and sell local artists’ work on the walls. When possible, they try to buy local ingredients, including local hops. Their tasting room, licensed to serve one pint per customer, comes with a comfy couch and long, eight-seat, wooden farmhouse table. It’s the kind of place you can enjoy a brew and make a new friend.

Even their namesake — an antique bike is proudly displayed — is a personal statement. “We always love to ride our bicycles whenever we go to a new place and just discover new locations and hidden spots,” Fariborz says.

“At the same time, we feel that the bicycle represents being simple, traditional and down to earth, and that is also the vision of our brewery.”

Hidden spots. New taste adventures. Something strong is brewing in Ottawa. The new crop of craft brewers are counting on locals to keep drinking it up.


A profile of select microbreweries opening before end of 2014, or recently opened, in the Ottawa area.

Waller St. Brewery
Opening: October
Location: 14 Waller St. (basement)
Beers: Red Rye (Belgian American Red Rye Session IPA), Moonlight Porter (Porter with an assertive American Hop profile), Bootleg Blonde (a balanced blonde ale made with local hops)
Availability: Onsite retail space.
Brewing philosophy: “All our beers are made with natural ingredients with a healthy serving of hard work and attention to details.”

Bicycle Craft Brewery
Opening: Sept. 20
Location: 850 Industrial Ave., Unit 12
Beers: Velocipede IPA, Belle River Blonde, Base Camp Oatmeal Porter, Abyss Chocolate Stout
Availability: Onsite retail space
Brewing philosophy: “We are a traditional, all-grain, small-batch brewery that is down to earth and makes great tasting craft beer.”

Dominion City Brewing Co.
Opening: Open
Location: #15-5510 Canotek Rd.
Beers: Town & Country Blonde Ale, Two Flags IPA, Earl Grey Marmalade Saison
Availability: Onsite retail space. Also on tap or in bottle at following bars/restaurants: Coconut Lagoon, BITE Burger House, Brother’s Beer Bistro, Town, The Lieutenant’s Pump, Union Local 613, Fauna: Food + Bar, Salt Dining + Lounge, Teatro Café, Wellington Gastropub, Bowman’s Bar & Grill
Brewing philosophy: “We brew our beer using heirloom organic specialty grains grown and milled right here in the Ottawa Valley. It’s our way of producing a unique product that celebrates the best of our region.”

Square Timber Brewing Company
Opening: Open
Location: 800 Woito Station Rd., Pembroke, Ont.
Beers: Timber Crib Pale Ale, Big Pine IPA, Camboose DIPA, Deacon Seat Hefeweizen (plus many seasonals)
Availability: In growlers at the brewery and at bars/restaurants in Renfrew County and Ottawa.
Brewing philosophy: “The people, history and culture of the Ottawa Valley are all rich and colourful and we want to pay respect to these with our company’s philosophy and our beers — hand-hewn ales and lagers from the heart of the Ottawa Valley.”

Whiprsnapr brewing co.
Opening: October
Location: 14 Bexley Place, Unit 106 — Bells Corners
Beers: Root of evil (pre-Prohibition lager), Inukshuk (Canadian IPA), Carol Anne (Irish Blonde Ale), Black Sunshine (Black Lager), F’n’L (British IPA), Unf… (sweet stout); seasonal beers will include The Mick (maple cream ale) and Blueberry Pancakes (made with real maple syrup, blueberries and wheat malts), and a yet to be named ginger beer.
Availability: Primarily on-site to start, with availability at one to two restaurant/bars.
Brewing philosophy: “A whiprsnapr is something an old man used to call an up-and-coming, overconfident punk-ass kid. We’re the whiprsnapr’s of the brewing industry! But whiprsnapr’s are more than that — we’re energetic, hard-working and fun-loving — we earn our beer.”

Cartwright Springs Brewery
Opening: Aiming for December
Location: 239 Deer Run Rd., Pakenham
Beers: A variety of ales (IPA, SMASH, ESB, Kolsh) and seasonal beers.
Availability: Available in select local bars and restaurants by end of 2014, with plans to open retail space in early 2015.
Brewing philosophy: “Our story is simple. We found spring water, which makes all the difference. I have been making beer for about 20 years. The quality has improved to a new level since using the spring water. We plan to make our operation as environment friendly and sustainable as possible. We care for the environment and our natural spring is our key resource so we strive to protect it.”

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...out-craft-beer
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Old Posted Oct 2, 2014, 5:26 PM
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Beyond the Pale will have to close their Hintonburg location in order to open up in City Centre because of Ontario regulations limiting the number of stores a microbrewery can have unless they produce a certain volume of beer
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...sure-1.2785400
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Old Posted Oct 2, 2014, 7:34 PM
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Beyond the Pale will have to close their Hintonburg location in order to open up in City Centre because of Ontario regulations limiting the number of stores a microbrewery can have unless they produce a certain volume of beer
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...sure-1.2785400
The absurdity of our liquor laws...
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Old Posted Oct 3, 2014, 5:41 AM
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Ah yes, our 1927-vintage liquor laws. Untouchable, unable to ever be liberalized, no matter what stripe of government is in power.

The province can talk a great game about entrepreneurship and the need for jobs and revenue (we spent $11 billion on debt interest ever year, and rising), but heaven forbid we touch our prohibition-era laws.

Kids will die and society will collapse overnight - it will be like shadows, only many times worse!

We bitch and moan, but when only 13% of residents believe (still, after 87 years) that the Beer Store ISN'T publically owned, what are we to do? We live in a province where the status quo is kept in force by myths that we celebrate.

It's kid of like a children's fable, only more depressing.
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Old Posted Feb 12, 2015, 5:48 PM
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Winter Brewfest bound for Lansdowne Park
Celebration of local suds aims to take chill away

By Steph Willems
Ottawa East News, Feb 11, 2015


It’s proven to be a cold winter so far, but the organizers of Ottawa’s first annual Winter Brewfest believe they have just the antidote.

Lansdowne Park will be the venue for the festival, which will showcase the beers of 25 local craft breweries – just the thing to warm up a frostbitten populace. The event, held Feb. 13-14, is being organized by the team behind Festibiere Gatineau, a summer craft brew event now in its fifth year.

Held adjacent to the Rideau Canal, in and around the renovated Horticulture Building, the event’s organizers said they wanted to capitalize on the new venue and the close proximity to Winterlude activities. Winterlude, along with the city, a host of media outlets and the participating brewers, is a partner in the event.

“It’s always something we’ve had in our planning – to cross over the bridge to the Ottawa side,” said Michael O’Farrell, general manager of Festibiere Gatineau/Winter Brewfest. “It was an opportunity we couldn’t pass up.”

O’Farrell said the popularity of the Gatineau festival has risen in recent years, in step with the growing popularity of craft beer – and craft beer brewing - in the region. Close to 80 beers will be on tap to sample, with brewery staff on hand to answer any questions about their products and operations.

The event’s venue – the Horticulture Building – offers plenty of warm, open space for patrons seeking shelter from the cold, but there will also be an outdoor portion. O’Farrell said a fenced-in outdoor section of the event will offer warm beer and cider, maple sugar taffy, as well as seating and heaters.

Each day of the event will see a “dream barrel” of locally-produced beer donated from a participating brewery auctioned off, with all proceeds donated to the CHEO Foundation.

Advance tickets are available for $20 through the event’s website, brewfest.ca, which contains plenty of information on the organizers, participants and partners. O’Farrell said that he and his team have been pleased with the reaction to this inaugural festival.

“The interest shown to this event is phenomenal,” he said.

http://www.ottawacommunitynews.com/n...ansdowne-park/
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Old Posted Apr 16, 2015, 4:29 PM
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Originally Posted by waterloowarrior View Post
Beyond the Pale will have to close their Hintonburg location in order to open up in City Centre because of Ontario regulations limiting the number of stores a microbrewery can have unless they produce a certain volume of beer
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa...sure-1.2785400
This regulation is now to be revoked as part of the province's alcohol liberalization plan whose details were finally announced today:

Quote:
Small brewers across Ontario will also be allowed to sell beer on-site at all their locations, no matter how small, which was previously restricted.
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/na...385/story.html
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Old Posted Apr 17, 2015, 12:10 AM
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This regulation is now to be revoked as part of the province's alcohol liberalization plan whose details were finally announced today:


http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/na...385/story.html
Beer taxes, the LCBO online and Growlers: Big changes coming to Ontario booze

Ashley Csanady 04.15.2015


It’s been almost 30 years since Ontarians were told they would be able to buy beer in a grocery store, and it’s finally about to happen.

The big news — that brews are coming to your grocery stores and possibly in time for the 2015 holiday season — was revealed weeks ago.

But like a Price Is Right bit, the Ontario government announced Thursday, wait, there’s more!

A lot more, at least a lot more than expected in a province where a labyrinth of agreements, regulations and interest groups have obfuscated the path to reform for decades.

“The days of monopoly are done,” Premier Kathleen Wynne said at a news conference Thursday. She said the suite of reforms are also just the beginning, as the province sets out to reform wine and spirit sales as well.

The government’s plans to reform booze sales and overhaul its electricity sector are expected to wring $5 billion out of existing assets for the provincial Trillium Trust, which funds infrastructure and transit.

Craft brewers and organizations representing spirits producers welcome the news, even MADD Canada got on board with the province’s social responsibility plans for supermarket sales. The Beer Store said in a statement it will “continue to work with” the Ontario government to implement the changes.

But for thirsty Ontarians everywhere, hungry for a lakeside brew, here’s what you need to know about how your booze might be about to change, one tiny step at a time:
  • Double number of beer outlets

The province will sell licences to 450 grocers across the province, which will essentially double the number of beer-specific retails from the current 447 Beer Stores across Ontario. These retailers will only be allowed to sell six-packs or single beers. The licences will require social responsibility training, special hours, separated closed off areas for the beer, and limit annual sales per outlet to $1 million. The licences will be phased in over time, and 150 outlets should be open by May 1, 2017.
  • New agreement for Beer Store

The Beer Store’s previous deal with the government was lambasted by critics and crafter brewers for giving three foreign-owned brewers too much control over an antiquated system that didn’t offer the best experience. The new framework, expected to increase government revenues by $100 million, will last 10 years. It also means The Beer Store will remain the destination for your empties and deposit returns, but the new agreement will save the LCBO $30 million a year. It does not include a franchise fee as the interim report suggested.
  • A new tax on beer

Instead of a franchise fee for the Beer Store, the panel opted for a new tax on all beer sales in the province. The new tax means the price of 24-pack will increase 25 cents every Nov. 1 for the next five years, a decision Clark said was made in fairness to the big brewers. To try to ensure that’s not passed onto consumers, the new Beer Store agreement ensures prices for the most popular brands will not increase before May 1, 2017, which makes up about 50 per cent of all beer sales. But small and craft brewers and the other half of all brands could see small increases. The government believes it will bring in $100 million a year for the trust.
  • Beer Ombudsman and other structural reforms

A Beer Store Ombudsman will field customer and brewer concerns alike. The new framework will also open up the structure of The Beer Store to check the power of the big brewers. The board of directors will now include four independent directors who are appointed by government in consultation with the Beer Store. One of these directors will hold a tie-breaking vote.
  • More space for craft brewers

The Beer Store must set aside 20 per cent of all shelf space, merchandising, marketing and promotional programs for small brewers, under the new agreement. They currently have about seven per cent. It must also establish “craft” as a category and scale costs of listing beers to the size of the brewery producing it. Small brewers across Ontario will also be allowed to sell beer on-site at all their locations, no matter how small, which was previously restricted.
  • Beer Store $100-million makeover

The barebones Beer Stores will be getting a $100-million facelift, with at least 80 per cent of that money committed under the new agreement going to retail store improvements. The new deal also requires all new stores to be open concept and self-serve format, and include more chances for brewers to show off cool new suds to consumers.
  • Growlers are coming

The LCBO will soon start offering “growlers,” which are refillable beer containers that often hold between 750 millilitres and a litre. They are common in other parts of Canada, especially in the Atlantic provinces.
  • LCBO online retail

The LCBO will launch a new online store that will offer consumers more choice, especially those who don’t live near one of the large, big-box style LCBO stores with massive spirit and wine offerings. It will offer both in-store and home delivery.
  • Niche boutiques

The LCBO will also launch new niche and specialty boutiques for craft beer, wine and spirits, such as whisky. The report says these will be include in LCBO stores, as opposed to separate retail outlets.
  • New pricing and mark-up strategy for LCBO

The panel is working with the LCBO to capitalize on its pricing and mark-up strategy to increase profits. “That won’t affect consumers,” Clark said, “that’s really a strategy of taking it (revenue) out of producers, not consumers.”
  • 12-pack pilot in 10 stores

LCBO stores can currently only sell six-packs of beer and singles, whether cans or large bottles. This was written into the old Beer Store agreement to help protect its sales of 12- and 24-packs. Now the province will test-run allowing 10 LCBO stores to sell 12 packs and could eventually ramp that up to 60. Why is it such a small fraction of the retailer’s 651 locations? The panel states, “This initiative may significantly erode the economics of The Beer Store, especially in light of the Council’s proposal to sell beer in grocery stores.”
  • A scrap for restaurants

Bars and restaurants have long complained the Beer Store charged them more than the retail price for bottles, and they were not allowed to buy their beer like a consumer. About 9,000 small pubs and restaurants (who sell fewer than 250 24-packs of beer a year) will now pay the same price as consumers.
  • No wine in your supermarket

Though the suds will flow through supermarket checkouts, you still won’t be able to grab a Beaujolais with your baguette. The panel requested more time to look at the wine issue, given it contains its own complexities as there are almost 300 private wine stores in the province that were grandfathered into free trade agreements.
  • Spirit of change

The panel will also continue work on reforming the sale of spirits. It will conduct consultations and analysis “in parallel with our work on wine retailing and to bring forward proposals on future directions at the same time.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/na...385/story.html
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Old Posted Apr 17, 2015, 12:11 AM
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Microbrewers applaud proposed new rules for beer sales in Ontario

Vito Pilieci, Ottawa Citizen
Published on: April 16, 2015, Last Updated: April 16, 2015 5:44 PM EDT


Craft brewers across the province, including several in Ottawa, are raising a modest toast to the province’s proposed changes to the way Ontarians buy beer.

The changes, which are being made to increase consumer choice and provide more shelf space to Ontario microbrewers while increasing revenues for government, are expected to be announced as part of the Ontario budget later this month.

“It’s not everything that we were asking for as craft brewers, but it really looks like they’ve spent time thinking about how to protect us, while increasing access to customers and making the system fairer,” said Steve Beauchesne, co-founder of Beau’s All Natural Brewing Co in Vankleek Hill. “I’m pretty excited about all of the changes that are coming.”

The proposals included in a report released Thursday and based on recommendations of former TD Bank chief Ed Clark will require The Beer Store to allot at least 20 per cent of its shelf space to Ontario craft brewers and reduce craft brewers’ listing fees. The rules will also allows as many as 450 grocery stores to sell beer.

“It’s got to be positive. The problem for craft breweries has been locations where we can sell beer,” said Lon Ladell, brewmaster at Big Rig Brewery. “If it’s in front of more people, hopefully we will be able to to grow (craft beer’s) three per cent market share to something similar to some other provinces.”

Ontario microbreweries had been asking to create their own store, similar to Wine Rack stores in supermarkets across the province.

While the government is loosening restrictions for on-site beer sales at a brewery, it doesn’t appear new independent craft beer stores will be allowed. In fact, the report applauded The Beer Store for being big and centralized, saying it is efficient and that tearing it apart would be irresponsible and costly.

“Our conclusion was that, despite its faults, the current system has one redeeming feature: it is efficient and low cost, allowing customers to enjoy prices below the Canadian average while supporting a competitive yield for taxpayers,” the report reads.

Beauchesne admitted that while he is on side with a majority of what’s being proposed, he is a little puzzled by some of the recommendations, which include a cap of $1 million a year in beer sales at each grocery store and a new tax on beer that will add as much as $1 per case of 24 over the next four years, and is expected to generate as much as $100 million in new revenues by 2019.

Beauchesne said he hopes the money he saves from lower Beer Store listing fees will help to offset some of the costs associated with new tax.

Ontario lags far behind British Columbia and Quebec when it comes to microbrew market share. In the some U.S. states, microbrew sales account for more than 30 per cent of all beer sold.

Boosting the sale of microbrewed offerings is something that could also help the province’s economy, according to the lobby group Ontario Craft Brewers.

“These new changes will allow craft brewers to double or triple our share, which will create another 1,000 to 2,000 direct craft brewery jobs across the province,” said Cam Heaps co-founder of Steam Whistle Brewing and chair of the Ontario Craft Brewers. “The spinoffs jobs could create an additional 4,000 jobs.”

Microbrewers already account for 1,000 of the 3,000 people employed by breweries in Ontario.

While Ontario’s microbrew movement already seems to have hit full stride, John Hay, president of Ontario Craft Brewers, also said the changes could help to spur more breweries to open.

“We expect to see at least one brewery in nearly every community and multiple breweries in the larger communities,” he said, ” This will give a real shot in the arm to smaller communities and particularly to downtown cores that could really benefit from this economic stimulus.”

Modernizing beer sales was recommended by the government-appointed panel, which examined Crown assets to find ways to squeeze out the maximum value for the Liberals’ infrastructure plans. Other recommendations include creating a “beer Ombudsman” to handle complaints and issues arising from breweries and consumers and restructuring The Beer Store’s board, allowing three seats for the current owners and four for government appointed officials, allowing the government to hold the swing vote on any issues that need to be voted upon.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-...les-in-ontario
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  #18  
Old Posted Apr 17, 2015, 2:14 AM
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I really didn't think the Liberals could make the antiquated laws more complex, silly, and costly than they already are... but they managed to prove me wrong.

A beer ombudsman... now that takes the cake.. I'm sure the employees of the "beer ombudsman department" will all start on the sunshine list.

Just open a large foreign brewery, and one can buy governments... yeesh..
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Old Posted Apr 17, 2015, 2:36 AM
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^ This is Ontario. Land of rules and protectionist regulations, always has been. I for one am not going to let the perfect be the enemy of the good and welcome this small sliver of liberalization, which, sadly enough, is actually by a big margin the biggest liberalization since the repeal of Prohibition itself.
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Old Posted Apr 17, 2015, 2:37 AM
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I want to be the beer ombudsman. Where do I apply?
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