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  #4361  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 1:53 AM
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Originally Posted by harls View Post
Nice pics Nathan. The first one looks like smog (boo), but pretty sure it's fog (yay).
I believe your latter assumption is correct in this case, though Regina has had smoke roll in from the more severe wildfires in Alberta and Northern Sask over the last few years.
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  #4362  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 1:58 AM
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  #4363  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 2:29 AM
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Kitchener, by myself:
MSP 20190625-IMG_4263 by Matt, on Flickr
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  #4364  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 2:34 AM
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Originally Posted by advance62 View Post
Kitchener, by myself:
MSP 20190625-IMG_4263 by Matt, on Flickr
Was that photo taken before the Duke Tower crane went up, or is it just not high enough yet to see it from that vantage point? The idea of four, soon to be six or more, cranes up in DTK at the same time amazes me.

Last edited by kwoldtimer; Jun 28, 2019 at 3:17 AM.
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  #4365  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 3:28 AM
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Was that photo taken before the Duke Tower crane went up, or is it just not high enough yet to see it from that vantage point? The idea of four, soon to be six or more, cranes up in DTK at the same time amazes me.
This was just the other night. You can't see the Duke crane from this angle yet but as it rises you will. There are already 5 in DTK and at least 3-5+ more will be up by late summer. Garment Street, Young Condos, Drewlo, etc
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  #4366  
Old Posted Jun 28, 2019, 3:11 PM
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Nice Regina shots on the previous page!
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  #4367  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 6:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Nouvellecosse View Post
I like how all the highrises and midrises make it look like a major city.
What is or isn't a major city is pretty subjective.

One thing I've noticed is that in Canada (with SSP Canada being at an extreme), there is a tendency to think of the N largest cities in the country as major. Calgary got "promoted" to major status sometime around the 1970's-90's. Halifax might or might not be considered major depending on who you talk to, and Saint John got demoted at one point (it was 100% major at Confederation, and borderline by the 1930's). A non-major city may be larger than a major city from 20 years ago.

In 1971 the largest municipality in Canada had 438,000 people. Halifax is going to pass this in the next few months probably.

Back in the 19th century Canadian cities maxed out at 200,000 or so. London had 6.5 million people by 1900 (!). Even the largest Canadian city was tiny in comparison, and the smaller Canadian cities were equivalent to small provincial towns in Europe, and really probably felt small in a bunch of objective ways (not much anonymity, not much large-scale infrastructure, etc.). Today it's no longer like this; Toronto would be a major city in any country and the smaller regional cities in Canada are on par with similar European cities.

(There's also Canadian snobbishness or insecurity, e.g. people from Toronto who go to Montreal or Vancouver and can't stop talking about how small and provincial everything is whereas a Londoner might visit Montreal without making similar comments.)

It seems like this view is not getting adjusted as Canadian cities continue to grow. I doubt Halifax is going to feel much like a small town in 10-20 years in any objective way (e.g. it would take you quite a while to explore the city), but I bet Canadians will still talk about it like that's how it is. And we will of course have people talking about how they are uber cosmopolitan and Shanghai has 30 million people so anything less than 25 million is a stifling village to them.
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  #4368  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 7:42 PM
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I agree that the "Nth largest" as cut off is very practical since some countries and regions have very different population distribution than others. For instance, the 10th largest city in say Germany, would probably be a lot more "major" in the German context than the 10th largest city in France would be in the French context. If you start expanding to include even larger regions like continents or very large countries like the US or China and have the cut off be a small number like 10, then you're pretty much guaranteed to include all major cities but you'd probably also leave many out.

If I'm considering whether or not Halifax is major I'd be looking in at least the national context because while it's undoubtedly major in the context of NS or the Maritimes, that isn't particularly relevant either. I don't think there are much more than 10 incorporated cities in the Maritimes for that matter. Looking like a major NS city would just mean looking like Halifax, however it happened to look at that moment. In the national context I'd say we'd need to look at percentages of the largest city in terms of population and economy. I'd say 1/10 of the largest would make a good cut off. I mean, if you have a city that's not 50% larger, not double, not quadruple, but over 10x larger in the same country/region, it's pretty hard to argue that it's still a major city. Metro Montreal for example is about 1/3 the size of metro London and even that is a striking size difference. Of course it should go without saying that you don't need to be a major city to be important, interesting, attractive, prosperous, influential, or any of the other things cities might strive for. Even towns can be those things in some cases.

None-the-less, my comment was more about the aesthetics of the picture than anything. That the impression it gives isn't in keeping with the mental image derived from my daily experience.
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  #4369  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 8:31 PM
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I don't think the population ratios are inherently important. The 10% rule would suggest that Hamilton is a major Canadian city, which is pretty debatable. Also, Canada's a huge and somewhat decentralized country, so the national context doesn't mean the same thing that it does in say France.

I think "major city" is arbitrary, like "world class". It only has meaning to the extent that people invent subjective standards. In Canada, the term has a lot of baggage and connotations that don't hold anymore or might not hold in the future.

Population sort of matters in that it correlates with the phenomenon of big cities siphoning economic and cultural vibrancy off of nearby smaller cities. In some countries (particularly highly centralized dictatorships and the like), the effect is incredibly strong, and if you're not connected very directly to the government in the capital you are part of a backwater. In Canada this is tempered by general economic freedoms (somewhat; not as far as a bunch of heavily regulated industries go), language, and federalism. This is actually a good thing and I hope it doesn't disappear.

Population also correlates with urban vibrancy and street life but this is just something that is or was roughly true in a North American context in around the late 20th century. A city like Halifax could easily have 4x as much street life as it does if it were designed differently. We tend to associate big crowds, vibrant storefront shopping districts, etc. with larger cities but that's just because these became boutique phenomena in the postwar era. That is changing pretty quickly. Much much faster than current metropolitan growth rates in Canada.
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  #4370  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 9:09 PM
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The term "major" is certainly nebulous in the sense that there isn't a singular definition on how it should apply to for cities (size, fame, history, economy, power, impressiveness etc.) so it entirely depends on the meaning you're assigning to the term. In the way i was using it, the characteristics of the city aren't relevant since as I mentioned, you don't need to be a major city to be important, interesting, attractive, prosperous, influential, or any of the other things cities might strive for. In other words, a major city may or may not be vibrant or have good street life etc. I tend to use "major" as denoting relative size in a specific setting (a major city in Canada is not necessarily a major city on the continent or the world) while I'd use large as being universal (many globally small or medium size cities are major within their regions). Therefore I would definitely include Hamilton as major in the context of Canada. There's nothing really wrong with using it in your way; it's just a lot more complicated since you need to decide on including or excluding a lot of stats and decide where to make the cut-off for all of them rather than just the one.
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  #4371  
Old Posted Jun 29, 2019, 10:45 PM
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If it's just about population, "major" sounds needlessly vague though. Why not just say largest city or most populous city if those are synonyms? They have a clearer meaning.
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  #4372  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2019, 12:47 AM
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The way i was using it may not be in reference to a city whose exact ranking you're aware of. For instance, you may recognize that Hamilton must be at least a tenth the size of Toronto and big enough to be a major city without knowing if it's the 5th biggest or the 15th biggest in the country or whatever.
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  #4373  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2019, 2:12 AM
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More KW, please.
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  #4374  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2019, 2:24 AM
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More KW, please.
http://www.waterlooregionconnected.com/
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  #4375  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2019, 2:34 AM
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More KW, please.
I'm trying, photo editing is time consuming I'm not even finished Galt yet.
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  #4376  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2019, 11:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr Awesomesauce View Post
More KW, please.
Some K
MSP 20190216-IMG_9465 by Matt, on Flickr

and some W
Ion Uptown by Matt, on Flickr

and a little Cambridge
Galt by Matt, on Flickr
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  #4377  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 12:56 AM
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^Ahhhh feel better now, thanks!
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  #4378  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 2:45 PM
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and a little Cambridge
Galt by Matt, on Flickr[/QUOTE]

blessed day. ...under his eye.
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  #4379  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:04 PM
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Cambridge still has that charm of the 3 original cities: Galt, Preston, and Hespler which I have always found endearing.
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  #4380  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2019, 6:48 PM
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Cambridge still has that charm of the 3 original cities: Galt, Preston, and Hespler which I have always found endearing.
Hespeler.
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