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  #21  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2007, 6:45 PM
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walk
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  #22  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2007, 7:11 PM
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Bus or Bus to MAX, depending on traffic, and sometimes car to transit center and than MAX.
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  #23  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 12:58 AM
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I take the bus mostly. I am a fair weather biker. I try to bike a couple of days a week during the 'dry' season.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 1:25 AM
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I bike or bus to work/school from inner SE, work is on Killingsworth and about 45 minutes on either my bike or the bus. That hill on 33rd north of Grant H.S. can definately be a challenge some mornings.
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  #25  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 2:05 AM
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Streetcar for me baby! Probably one of the few, but proud, who use it as a commuter tool. Otherwise i'll walk or bus it if i need to. I do have a car and use it if i have to venture out to the suburbs or make the occasional trip down to salem.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 5:33 PM
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bus bus and more bus for me
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  #27  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 6:42 PM
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How about a bike tunnel through the west hills? Well, that would be a tall order, as it were, but there's precedent: The 2,000-foot I-90 trail through Mt. Baker in Seattle. It's the top level of a three level tunnel built during the I-90 reconstruction project about 15 years ago.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 8:23 PM
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^^^ Well... we already have one, really. You guys have seen this video, right???

Video Link
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  #29  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 9:59 PM
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I kept waiting for that guy to die. Was it all downhill?
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  #30  
Old Posted Jun 19, 2007, 10:32 PM
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^yep
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  #31  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2007, 12:19 AM
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that looks like the zoobomb route, isnt it?
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  #32  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2007, 2:40 AM
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yes it is... yes it is. Now you know how they do it - except at night!
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  #33  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2007, 5:52 AM
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Yeah, that route's 100% downhill. But the zoobombers usually go through Washington Park don't they? Past the rose garden, then down Burnside.
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  #34  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2007, 3:00 PM
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Portland tests 'bike box' to improve bicyclist's safety

Portland thinks outside 'bike box'
The city tests the traffic device while looking for ways to increase cyclist safety
Tuesday, October 23, 2007
JOSEPH ROSE and STUART TOMLINSON
The Oregonian

Bradley Richards' daily bicycle commute takes him smack-dab through Portland's newest experiment in bike safety. But the 25-year-old admits he hadn't even noticed the "bike boxes" he has been passing for more than a year.

Located in front of a quick-changing signal at Southeast Clinton Street and 39th Avenue, the box -- an idea borrowed from Europe -- allows bicyclists to move ahead of cars waiting at the stop light.

But Richards isn't the only one who has failed to notice the new feature, designed to prevent motorists from making the type of deadly "right-hook" turns that have killed two Portland cyclists in the past two weeks. Few cyclists and fewer drivers Tuesday afternoon paid attention to the bike-only area marked off before the crosswalk.

"Is that what that is?" Richards said. "I had no idea. I just always stay to the right in the bike lane."

The only Portland intersection with bike boxes is still, clearly, a work in progress. The same could be said for other nascent efforts to ease tensions and reduce accidents involving bikers, drivers and pedestrians on the city's increasingly crowded streets.

When it comes to educating the public about rules and responsibilities on the streets, "we could certainly be doing a lot better," said Roger Geller, bicycle coordinator for the Portland Department of Transportation.

Nearly two years ago, the story of a TriMet bus rider slugging bicyclist Randy Albright triggered a not-so-pretty public debate about rights to the road.

City officials responded to the tensions by printing "I Share the Road" bumper stickers. Since then, PDOT has handed out nearly 15,000 stickers, which have been spotted on everything from buses to a mini-train at a sushi restaurant.

The city has helped start a program where up to 200 motorists, pedestrians and cyclists a month get out of minor citations by attending a Share the Road safety course.

But judging from the angry and caustic comments surfacing this month in the wake of the deaths of cyclists Tracey Sparling and Brett Jarolimek, it's hard to say if the bumper stickers and classes have changed many attitudes. The back and forth on a local Craigslist community page has been particularly severe.

A bicyclist wrote that he carries a gun while riding and would "take out" any motorist who endangered him.

Meanwhile, an anonymous user from Multnomah County posted: "Must be open season on bike riders for trucks -- anybody know where a bicyclist hunting license can be obtained? I can borrow a truck."

Declared another: "Another one bikes the dust."

Greg Raisman, a PDOT traffic safety program manager, said it's difficult to measure the success of the Share the Road program, but he's convinced that civility has improved on the streets.

"Yes, there's still a lot of negative conversation among certain users," he said. "But I think there is a higher level of awareness out there."

Traffic officials often say they are guided by three Es -- engineering, enforcement and education -- when designing safer and smarter streets. But Geller said his agency has never done particularly well with the education component, largely because the funding doesn't exist.

The city's new bicycle master plan, due next year, is supposed to outline public education and funding strategies for the future. But with the city scraping for money to keep existing streets from falling apart, he said, the challenge could get more difficult.

As the bike boxes on Southeast Clinton show, new engineering often needs education.

Bike boxes are popping up in New York and London. They have been a fixture in bike-friendly Amsterdam for years. Earlier this year, Brussels installed 2,000 of the boxes in two months and "people got it," Raisman said.

But at the bike boxes on Southeast Clinton Street on Tuesday -- one on either side of 39th -- only two out of about 40 cars that traveled through the intersection during one half-hour period stopped at the bike box line -- set about 15 feet from the crosswalk -- when the light was red.

Few of the dozen or so cyclists that passed through during the same time strayed far from the bike lanes that straddle the boxes. A majority of the drivers made illegal right turns when the light was red, despite large signs telling them not to turn.

"I just stay back behind the cars if I think they're going to turn," said Theo Ellsworth, 31, an artist from Southeast Portland who relocated from Missoula, Mont., a year ago. "It's much safer here. In Missoula, people can park in the bike lane."

John Replinger, a transportation engineer for David Evans and Associates in Portland, said the bike boxes at Southeast Clinton Street make "good sense" because of the intersection's unique configuration.

But he conceded that there's a problem. "It's an uncommon adaptation from Europe that drivers here are not familiar with."

Geller believes the city may have fumbled the initial design. But changes are coming, as are several more bike boxes at intersections around Portland, he said. Portland likely will next try a design that has proven successful in London, where the boxes are deeper and clearly marked with bright colors and a large stencil of a bicyclist.

"Putting something out there that doesn't make sense to motorists," Geller said, "means they're just going to ignore it."

Joseph Rose: 503-221-8029; josephrose@news.oregonian.com
http://www.oregonlive.com/oregonian/...540.xml&coll=7
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  #35  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2007, 3:54 PM
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I use the Clinton/39th bike box every day to and fro work. Honestly, the boxes make common sense. Most auto drivers have figured it out by now...
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  #36  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2007, 2:40 AM
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Looks exactly like a European bike box. They need these on all city Bicycle Boulevards!

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  #37  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2007, 3:45 AM
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I was in London recently and the bike boxes are painted blue - much like some of the "dangerous" intersections in Portland such as the bike lanes coming off the Broadway bridge. I think that makes a HUGE difference for motorists as they are much more obvious.
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  #38  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2007, 6:14 AM
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i live on clinton street and most drivers disregard that box. if more cyclists just got in line behind the cars, then i think we would see less right hand hook accidents. i drive as well as bike commute, but don't trust cars to my left ever!! hope the bike box idea catches on though.
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  #39  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2007, 6:45 AM
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since bikes can go straight and cars can't, it makes a lot of sense. They would have the right-of-way and not the cars... with the cars behind. Can't right-hook then!
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  #40  
Old Posted Oct 26, 2007, 3:25 PM
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Improving Portland, one bike at a time
New BTA executive director takes on the city that cycles
POSTED: 06:00 AM PDT Thursday, October 25, 2007
BY NATHALIE WEINSTEIN
Daily Journal of Commerce

Every major city has an iconic mode of transportation. For New York, it’s the subway. For San Francisco, it’s the streetcar. Portland’s may just be the bicycle.

And that’s why the Bicycle Transportation Alliance’s new executive director, Scott Bricker, has his hands full.

The recent deaths of two Portland bikers have raised issues on how safe bikers and drivers really are on the city’s roadways.

“The biking community is really tight,” Bricker said. “We see that come out when there is a death of a cyclist.”

In 2005, the BTA completed its Blueprint for Better Biking, which surveyed more than 900 cyclists and identified 40 projects to improve biking in Portland.

“Clearly, bicycle safety tops the bill,” Bricker said. “Cyclists stated that riding bikes near and around cars was their top concern. They preferred bike paths and bike boulevards.”

So Bricker went to work with city Commissioner Sam Adams on the Safe, Sound and Green Streets project, which aims to add more than 100 miles of bike boulevards to the city.

“Bike infrastructure is cost-effective,” Bricker said. “Adding a bicycle box is putting paint on the street. The estimate for the bike boulevards is $25 million, which sounds like a lot, but traffic signals costs $250,000; bridges costs billions. It’s not a lot of money when you look at the miles.”

In addition, the BTA plans to have educational programs for cyclists and motorists to increase awareness in both parties.

“Everyone should take a couple seconds to be safe and courteous,” Bricker said. “We are hoping to educate cyclists so they are courteous and respectful and, at the same time, motorists should be respectful of cyclists and pedestrians.”

Another aspect of creating a bike-friendly culture in Portland, Bricker said, is encouraging non-bikers to put the pedal to the test.

“When we encourage cycling among peer groups, people support each other and start riding,” Bricker said.

One area the BTA is targeting, he said, is biking for businesses. Bricker hopes to institute a bike rental program, like one currently offered in Paris, so people commuting to work can have access to bicycles.

He hopes that, by creating more bikers, especially downtown, traffic and parking issues will decrease.

And by creating more bikers, Bricker said, the BTA can aid local businesses.

“Some businesses have realized that one car spot could be eight to 12 bicycles in the same space,” Bricker said. “Eight bikes instead of one car is more business.”

Portland has six such bike spaces installed, with three on Mississippi Avenue, two on Belmont Street and one at the Pacific Northwest College of Art.

Bricker has high hopes for greater bike accessibility, and he predicts another 120 miles of bike routes and the completion of a trail connecting downtown to the St. Johns Bridge in the next decade.

And the number of bikers, he said, will keep on growing.

“The young and the restless want to have a lifestyle where they can be active, and that’s a big part of their culture,” Bricker said. “If you go to a party (in Portland), the funnest part is riding to the party.”
http://www.djcoregon.com/articleDeta...ty-that-cycles
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