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  #21  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 3:34 PM
Urbanpdx Urbanpdx is offline
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I remember reading the economic analysis done for the Katz admin. and it was pretty interesting. Using updated numbers would be a good excersize. Mark seems to have great access to old reports, can you find that one Mr. Daman?
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 4:50 PM
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This is interesting...the stadium as part of the cap
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 5:18 PM
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That is a terrible idea!
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  #24  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 5:18 PM
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Here's about the best information I could find. The page I've copied below has links that would have taken me to city documents, but each of the links attached to city documents are 'no longer available'. All of the newspaper articles are in the archive section, the Washington Post story might be worth the purchase, but I still don't think any of the initial renderings are available.

I-405 Cap:

Architects look at Katz’s idea of developing I-405 airspace Oregonian, 5.15.98

Idea of I-405 lid unleashes inspiration: A downtown exhibit draws the curious and enthusiastic, plus a smattering of doubters wondering about other priorities Oregonian, 7.3.98

No limits on imagination mayor generates some welcome excitement by seeking unlimited ideas for capping I-405 Oregonian, 7.8.98

Katz proposes to bridge Portland’s gap: Portlanders were asked to participate in changing the landscape of the I-405 Vanguard, 7.8.98

The new urban frontier Washington Post, 7.15.98

Most opt for park on I-405 freeway cap during public debut Daily Journal of Commerce, 7.27.98

Dream ahead to 2023—live, work, play atop 405 Oregonian, 10.5.98

Volunteers present City Council with I-405 ‘capping’ report Oregonian, 11.19.98

Katz appoints team to study how to cap I-405 Oregonian, 4.5.99

Portland caps: Series of concrete lids over a Portland freeway could create new land for development in a city fast running out of downtown space Urban Land, 7.1.99

"As for West End-Lower Goose Hollow, it has a huge potential. It is between downtown and Northwest Portland, with light rail running through it, a new park block nearby, easy freeway access, and soon a streetcar to run on 10th and 11th Avenues. In the 1970s, we cut a massive swath through 12 blocks of this neighborhood to build I-405. It was a thriving and prosperous neighborhood of schools, religious institutions, businesses and bookstores near the library. Normally, I would not advocate that we cover up our mistakes, but in this case I would make an exception. I propose that we cover sections of I-405 and bring back a great neighborhood. Above I-405, and in the neighborhoods surrounding it, we have the potential to build parks, design an urban high tech campus, provide parking, create pedestrian walks, build housing, office and retail space. There is no question, this will be a challenging project, but also very exciting for the future of the city. Again, both the Rose Quarter and West End/Lower Goose Hollow projects, along with the River District and North Macadam will relieve the pressure to build more housing in single family neighborhoods." Vera Katz, State of the City address, 1.22.98

"The ‘Bridge the Divide and Cap I-405’ effort is a way for us to reconnect neighborhoods and to reclaim the land for better use. It is a way to capture elements that are Portland. It is a catalyst for the development of adjacent blocks that have languished for the last 30 years because of the freeway. Today, thanks to the American Society of Landscape Architects and the Landscape Architecture Foundation, and nearly one thousand citizens who participated in this visioning process, we now have some great ideas of how to reclaim some of the valuable neighborhoods lost during the construction of the I-405 ditch." Vera Katz, I-405 Vision Study Announcement, 10.15.98

"’Anything you want to envision has been done somewhere,’ said Paul Morris, whose team has been researching success stories from other cities." Business Journal, 6.26.98

"Mayor Vera Katz has brought new energy to an old idea last talked about in the 1986 Central City Plan. Back then, unlike many other visionary parts of the plan, the idea didn’t generate much serious interest." Oregonian, 7.8.98

"To have any hope that the central city will absorb the job and population growth earmarked in the Region 2040 forecast, we’re gonna need some land." Randy Gragg, Oregonian, 10.11.98

"Katz says capping the interstate also would help reduce growth pressures in other neighborhoods. The city is trying to add 70,704 homes by 2017 to help reduce sprawl in the region." Oregonian, 4.5.99

"Last year, nearly 1,000 people enthusiastically offered up ideas to capture more of Portland’s growth in the central city, reconnect neighborhoods and make better use of vacant air space by capping the I-405 freeway." Vera Katz, Oregonian, 5.12.99

In Portland's 1988 Central City Plan [I-405 CCP.doc], city planners first identified building on top of I-405 as a future vision for the city. Ten years later in the 1998 State of the City speech, challenged the citizens of Portland to revive that vision and think creatively about what could be built above I-405 to bridge the neighborhood divide created by the construction of I-405. Capping the freeway will provide Portland with an opportunity to protect more growth impacts on existing neighborhoods and help protect the Urban Growth Boundary by focusing more growth in the downtown area.

With the American Society of Landscape Architects and over 1000 neighborhood and expert volunteers, created a detailed vision strategy that calls for capping 26 blocks of I-405 to create space for 2,000 new jobs, 2,600 new housing units, 1,300 parking spaces, six acres of parks, retail and entertainment space. A strategy team composed of developers, city and state transportation staff, neighborhood representatives and interested citizens are currently developing an implementation strategy. Their report is due early 2000.


Mayor's Economic Development liaison:
Linly Rees
Office of the Mayor
1221 SW Fourth Ave., Suite 340
Portland, OR 97204-1995
direct line: (503) 823-4277
e-mail: lrees@ci.portland.or.us
http://www.ci.portland.or.us/mayorstate/I.htm
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  #25  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 5:22 PM
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I remember reading something that estimated feasiblity and costs on a block by block basis...

I think it was a 1999 report.

Last edited by Urbanpdx; Feb 1, 2007 at 6:30 PM.
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  #26  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 6:08 PM
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^To DaMan

Quote:
With the American Society of Landscape Architects and over 1000 neighborhood and expert volunteers, created a detailed vision strategy that calls for capping 26 blocks of I-405 to create space for 2,000 new jobs, 2,600 new housing units, 1,300 parking spaces, six acres of parks, retail and entertainment space. A strategy team composed of developers, city and state transportation staff, neighborhood representatives and interested citizens are currently developing an implementation strategy. Their report is due early 2000.
That will be awesome for Portland.

And other one post about the capping on the dome, it sounds crazy idea to me.
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  #27  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 6:40 PM
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^Even if the feasibility to build this, and the political will, isn't there, they have laid the groundwork for an incredible city addition when it does become cost effective, and even necessary when the downtown density is maxed. Vera might have been ahead of the city on this one, but her visioning will leave an incredible legacy long after she is no longer with us.
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  #28  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 6:55 PM
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the report is called

Bridge the Divide and Cap I-405

and was completed October 1998. I cannot find a copy of it...yet
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  #29  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2007, 6:57 PM
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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS PRESENTS MAYOR VERA KATZ WITH VISION
STUDY TO "BRIDGE THE DIVIDE AND CAP I-405

PORTLAND- Today the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Community Assistance Team presented Mayor Vera Katz and the citizens of Portland with a vision study on reclaiming 26 downtown blocks in what is currently vacant air space over the I-405 freeway.

The "Bridge the Divide and Cap I-405 Vision Study" details concepts of how to recapture some of the 38 blocks bulldozed in 1965 for the construction of the I-405 freeway ditch. The result is projected to lead to: 1,000 housing units for 2,000 residents; 650,000 square feet of commercial space, generating 1800 permanent new jobs; 2,200 parking spaces; six acres of parks; two acres of indoor recreational uses and 50,000 square feet for civic/exhibition space.

As part of the ASLA's national centennial celebration "100 Years 100 Parks" project, the Oregon chapter of the ASLA and the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF) took on the Mayor's State of the City challenge to envision possibilities of reclaiming parts of I-405. A Community Assistance Team (CAT), comprised of leading design, planning and engineering professionals from the Portland area, developed a "road map" of how a capping project would look from Glisan Street to 4th Avenue. Their assistance leveraged over $200,000 in pro bono services for the effort.

"I set out to spark peoples' imaginations and I am thrilled by the results. I want to thank the ASLA, the Landscape Architecture Foundation, and the thousand citizens who participated for their generous contribution to the City of Portland," said Katz. "If we are to keep Portland the livable city it is today, we must plan wisely for its future, by protecting and preserving our existing single family neighborhoods and focusing as much growth as possible in the central city. . . This process has taught us how to reconnect our neighborhoods, by enhancing our multi-modal transportation system by incorporating bicycle and pedestrian ways with light rail and freeway access, and for creating economic development opportunities in unique Portland tradition."

The "Bridge the Divide and Cap I-405 Vision Study" represents the combined efforts of the ASLA, the Mayor's Office and various neighborhoods, businesses, educational institutions, and city and state agencies, as well as over 1000 citizens. In what the Mayor called a "model of what a public involvement project should be" citizens participated in an Open House at Pioneer Square, three design workshops, and a consensus building workshop where all of the ideas were synthesized into one thematic concept map.

"Capping I-405 is an idea which follows the classic Portland spirit for creating a vision for the next millennium," said Portland developer John Carroll. "The preliminary plans provide glimpses of what the future holds, and I'd like to play a role because it has merit and is doable."

"This project sought to bridge the divide of I-405 by using a series of caps to reconnect eight key neighborhoods to the central city, while creating enhanced multi-modal transportation options and spurring economic development over currently vacant air space. At the same time, we are pleased to have developed a study that: 1) encourages private investment; 2) creates an inviting atmosphere; and 3) proposes structures that contribute to the urban and natural environment," said Paul Morris, President of McKeever/Morris, ASLA Oregon chapter trustee, and project manager for the "Bridge the Divide and Cap I-405" effort.

Of the eight areas, citizens identified two as priorities for redevelopment: Civic Stadium/West End and West Burnside, including the following projects:

Civic Stadium/West End: A "MAX Mixed-Use District" providing three new city blocks of retail/office/housing that reconnect the West End business and retail with the Civic Stadium area, while complementing the scale and design of the existing surrounding architecture and completing the light rail station located on top of the freeway. The "MAX Mixed Use District" was identified as one of the first priorities because it capitalizes on the intersection of the new Westside Light Rail line. Located between the Civic Stadium District and the West End District -- both of which have planning efforts underway -- the area offers excellent opportunities for intermediate investment and development.

West Burnside: A "Bright Light District" building on existing urban form to create a dynamic mixed-use entertainment and office center encompassing three new city blocks. It is composed of the public entertainment center with an expansive plaza that is surrounded by an Urban Conservatory, cafes, restaurants, shops, nightclubs, offices, housing, and parking.

Among the benefits of capping the freeway in the citizen-identified priority areas of MAX Mixed Use District and the Burnside Bright Light District, is the creation of new tax revenue. From an estimated 195,000 square feet of commercial space within the two priority areas, the projected tax revenue for the city is $625,429. The new funds could be used to help build infrastructure needed to support public/private developments.

Other project links emphasized for the Pearl District/Northwest Portland; Goose Hollow/PSU; and PSU/Duniway include:

Pearl District/NW: A sports recreation center, combining a mix of parking, retail, and athletic facilities into a sports complex that covers three new city blocks.

Goose Hollow/PSU: 1) "Main Street Commons," a three-block park set atop a 450-space parking structure with an outdoor gathering space, a plaza, and children's playground; 2) A civic and office center reinforcing the emerging activity in the West End and the Cultural Districts with civic/office and housing/retail development opportunities along Jefferson and Columbia Streets as major East-West connections to and from the downtown core; 3) "South Market Square" with neighborhood retail, shops, and services with affordable housing opportunities to the adjacent neighborhood and PSU.

PSU/Duniway: A PSU Expansion with an eye toward the future of high-technology and research, integrated with housing and local employment over two city blocks. Also, a "Broadway Round-About" helping to resolve a difficult driving experience centered around six key streets by redefining the flow of traffic through a traditional European scaled round-about, framed around the perimeter by two new blocks of housing.

Katz said she intends to appoint a steering committee of public and private stakeholders to oversee the predevelopment work, identify sources of funding, and coordinate building partnerships between the city, state and federal government for capping the freeway. The Mayor indicated she will announce further details and provide a progress report in her 1999 State of the City Address, January 22, 1999.

The American Society of Landscape Architects' "100 Parks, 100 Years" program commemorates ASLA's 100th anniversary in 1999 and celebrates 100 years of designing American landscapes. ASLA's 47 Chapters, located coast to coast and in Hawaii, will renovate or create 100 parks and greenspaces across the country. This charitable program will beautify America's neighborhoods, town and cities and create places for community life.

The American Society of Landscape Architects, founded in 1899, represents over 12,000 members nationwide. Landscape architecture is the comprehensive discipline of land analysis, planning, design, management, preservation and rehabilitation. Typical projects include site design and planning, town and urban planning, regional planning, preparation of environmental impact plans, garden design, historic preservation, and parks/recreation design and planning. Landscape architects hold undergraduate or graduate degrees. They are licensed to practice in 46 states and are required to pass a rigorous national three-day examination. For more information, visit our web site at www.asla.org.
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  #30  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2007, 9:09 AM
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wonder how this is going?
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  #31  
Old Posted Feb 17, 2007, 4:14 AM
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Clark County official says money isn't available for new bridge across Columbia

Clark County official says money isn't available for new bridge across Columbia
Posted by Allan Brettman February 16, 2007 19:13PM
Categories: Clark County

VANCOUVER -- Steve Stuart, chairman of the Board of Clark County Commissioners, has a simple question about the possibility of a new bridge spanning the Columbia River.

Where's the money going to come from?

Not many years ago, a speculative price tag of $1 billion for a new bridge was bandied about. Then it grew to $2 billion. And lately, Stuart says, transportation officials have said $6 billion is about right.

And 50 percent is the largest share the region should expect the federal government to pay, Stuart said.

Instead of such a pricey project, he laid out an alternative today that emphasized improved mass transit, reconfigured interchanges and other large-scale tweaks that he said would be less costly.

Stuart made the suggestions while delivering the annual state of the county address.

The speech covered several fronts:

Increased funding and enhanced strategies to combat the spread of methamphetamine use.

A promise that the commissioners would adopt a 20-year growth plan this year. Stuart noted that the county's population is a little more than 400,000 and projected to grow to 600,000 in 20 years.

He said the county will follow through on building all of the parks that were expected by voters in the unincorporated urban area of the county who approved creation of a parks taxing district in 2005.

Stuart's stance on transportation fell short of Vancouver Mayor Royce E. Pollard's declaration in January -- in that city's "state" speech -- that any new bridge proposal without light rail would not be tolerated.

http://blog.oregonlive.com/breakingn..._says_mon.html
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  #32  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 7:42 PM
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Poster promotes light rail

Tuesday, May 22, 2007
BY DON HAMILTON, Columbian staff writer

Nearly three dozen Vancouver businesses are jumping into the mass transit debate on the side of light rail.

Vancouver Businesses for Smart Transportation, as the group calls itself, has signed up 35 businesses that favor light rail for the planned new bridge over the Columbia River. The group also supports Vancouver Mayor Royce Pollard's plan to cover Interstate 5 through downtown.

"It will make us more connected to downtown Portland, and connect Portland with downtown ­Vancouver," said Joanie Sather, a Wallis Engineering employee and the group's president. "But the big thing is not adding more traffic."

The bistate Columbia River Crossing task force is evaluating both light rail and bus rapid transit as a mass transit component for a proposed new bridge. The draft environmental impact statement, to be ready by the end of the year, will look at one route along the east side of Interstate 5 and another along Main Street, both terminating at a park-and-ride lot north of 39th Street.

Light rail remains an expensive and controversial mass transit option. Cost of the bridge project - mass transit included - hasn't been set but could reach $6 billion. Supporters hope the federal government will pay a portion, bridge tolls may be imposed as may some type of local tax, but so far, no clear source of money has been found.

A few employees at Wallis Engineering, 317 Columbia St., started Vancouver Businesses for Smart Transportation last winter. They felt light-rail opponents received more coverage in the media and wanted to demonstrate that light rail had supporters downtown. The group counts among its backers Pollard, who has been vocal in his support for light rail and the advantages of connecting to Portland's existing system.

The campaign for members was a low-tech effort, no Web sites or blogs. They merely signed up members by visiting shops downtown and in Uptown Village. They plan to lobby the Columbia River Crossing task force and the Vancouver City Council.

Members of the organization were also enticed by the offer of a poster. The image, an oil painting of a streetcar, has the company's name followed by "? supports light rail to Vancouver."

No decision has been made on a line or route, but some members hoped to see light- rail trains go north from downtown Vancouver to Uptown Village. Such a line, a member said, would bring new customers.

"I've seen it transform neighborhoods in Portland," said Chris Jochum, owner of Urban Eccentric on Main Street, a vintage clothing store. "Interstate's a good example. That whole neighborhood is alive with people and pedestrians and shops. I don't see any negative to light rail."

Cost has always been a factor among opponents. But Sather, of Wallis Engineering, said members of the organization know the cost will be high.

"It's obvious," she said. "But it's not that costly considering what Portland already put in to it. I own property in downtown Vancouver and I think it would be hugely beneficial. I'd be willing to pay for it."

Members of Vancouver Businesses for Smart Transportation
A Touch of Healing, Alling Henning Associates, Allstate Kim Jiries Agency, Brian H. Wolfe, P.C., Coffee Lounge, Columbia Dance Company, Contessa, Currie & McLain CPAs, D Side Studio, E2 Land Use Services, GE Services Inc., Ice Cream Renaissance, Java House, J.D. Walsh & Associates, Journey to Wellness, Dr. Cynthia Bye, Kramer Gehlen & Associates, Le Bijou Boutique, Logic Product Development, Maria's Vintage, Marketplace Flowers, Mike's Bikes Uptown Cycles, Mint Tea, Mon Ami, One Step Ahead Enterprises, The Resource Company, Salmon Creek Brewery, Tangles, Tommy O's, Tribe 2, LLC, Unraveled Fine Yarns, The Urban Eccentric, Urban Words Group, Video Connections, Wallis Engineering, Wishing Well - Search Within
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  #33  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 9:14 PM
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Royce Pollard makes Tom Potter look like a park bench.
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  #34  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 9:34 PM
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^^^^


Can we trade mayors?
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  #35  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 9:41 PM
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God I wish we could. The last election was a joke. I miss Vera.
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  #36  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 9:49 PM
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I want to see Vera's protege, Sam, in the mayor's office. He's not afraid to think big, and he knows how to get things done at City Hall. Tom's a great guy, he's just not as politically astute, and definitely not visionary.
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  #37  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 10:31 PM
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^Sam's a little fake and has a tendency to really piss the opposition off, no matter what the conflict. He has great ideas but I think Commissioner Charlie Hales is a better fit for Portland...run Charlie...RUN DAMNIT!
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  #38  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 10:53 PM
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I'd vote for Hales.

I voted for Adams and have been moderately dissapointed.
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  #39  
Old Posted May 22, 2007, 11:01 PM
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^^^^
Sam is definitely a panderer, no doubt about it. Not his best trait, but he gets things done.

Honestly, if Charlie would run, I'd vote for him over anybody, including Sam. Charlie is truly visionary and also well-respected. I havent seen any indication that he will run though. Hopefully I'm wrong.
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  #40  
Old Posted May 23, 2007, 12:27 AM
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I'm not a big Sam Adams fan. His aprehension to weigh in on charter reform really killed it for me. What was he waiting for?

Personally, I would like to see someone emerge who isn't of the current political class...a creative entrepreneur who holds dear the ideals of our city, but isn't afraid to shake things up at City Hall. I'm not sure who this would be...a developer, Tim Boyles, who knows? Portland is becoming a big city, and we need a mayor with vision--not one who spends lots of time and money researching visions--like our current mayor.
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