HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #2121  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2020, 5:22 PM
City Wide City Wide is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaamazarite View Post
Whoa whoa slow down there brosephs and brosephines--

All I know is that a group has a site under contract and a Floor Area Ratio they are going for that would be impossible to be anything under 20 stories based on the lot size and its unique characteristics.

Of the other two, one of them is not a secret-- Goldenberg Group was supposed to do a presentation on March 16th for their new building to be built at the northwest corner of 38th and Chestnut but Covid delayed everything. I'm told this one is still in process.

The third one is still in preliminary stages, the developer still hasn't made the deal on the land (as far as I know). I just know about it because someone involved spilled the beans. It's NOT the 38th/Market parking lot like someone suggested but will be 20+ stories.

As far as University City being on fire, you all don't know the half of it-- several smaller projects being proposed in the next year or two and I know at least two (possibly three) big sites that are under contract and another big site about to be listed.
38th & Chestnut, the old site of Chili's, makes some sense, as there already are 2 towers on that corner. And the 4100 block all the way through to Sansom is owned a big UC, and other places, landlord, and they already have a relationship with Amazon, so that could pop.
Then my favorite would be 42th & Walnut where 7/11 has a store of sorts. It's a big lot with a parking lot behind it.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2122  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2020, 5:32 PM
Boku Boku is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 723
Nothing specific, but it bodes well for continued development.

Philadelphia’s 'hungry' cell and gene therapy companies seek more lab space, capital to fuel growth

https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...t-barrier.html

Quote:
Philadelphia’s fast-growing cell and gene therapy companies continue to face challenges related to capital, talent and infrastructure, local executives said last week during the Philadelphia Business Journal's "It's in Our Genes" virtual event.

Greater Philadelphia's cell and gene therapy industry is poised to explode in the next several years if it continues on its current trajectory, but the region isn’t teeming with the capital and space needed to accommodate that explosive growth, said Lalo Flores, chief executive officer of Century Therapeutics.

“I think Philadelphia wasn’t really prepared to confront this success and this momentum that we’ve seen these last few years,” Flores said.

Companies have struggled to quickly find the space they need to expand, he said. Lab space in cell and gene therapy hubs like University City goes for a premium, and real estate firms are working to convert office space into lab space to get startups what they need.

Infrastructure goes beyond lab space, as well, said Joan Lau, CEO of Spirovant Science. The region needs to be able to meet the demand for dining and catering, marketing support, web infrastructure and other services that aren’t specific to the biotech field but can still help it grow, she said.

Philadelphia has become a hotbed of cell and gene therapy companies, and that is largely because of the University of Pennsylvania. The university spun out companies like Carisma Therapeutics and Tmunity Therapeutics, and research talent flows from the school to startups.

“You go to where the talent is, and there’s talent in our space,” said Usman "Oz" Azam, CEO of Tmunity Therapeutics. “It’s prize talent, and it’s hopefully going to be talent that we ferment and grow within our respective companies.”

Century Therapeutics — which emerged from “stealth mode” this year with big plans to hire — was able to grow because of the wealth of talent in Philadelphia from universities like Penn and from pharmaceutical companies in the region, Flores said. Century was not only looking for biology researchers, but also engineers, quality control experts and more, he said. The region has developed an expertise in cell and gene therapy, which drove Century to build and grow in Philadelphia, he said.

But the talent pool in Philadelphia isn’t bottomless, the CEOs said. As Philadelphia’s cell and gene therapy industry continues its rapid growth — the sector could create as many as 7,600 new jobs in the region over the next decade — Greater Philadelphia needs to focus on building its workforce by emphasizing workforce education, said Steven Kelly, CEO of Carisma Therapeutics. The industry’s business creation and job generation can boost a municipality’s or state’s tax base, and local governments should see cell and gene therapy as an investment for the future, he said.

Before cell and gene therapy startups can even think about growth – whether through hiring new staff or signing a lease – they need to secure capital. Azam put it plainly: “It starts and stops with capital.”

It’s a capital-intensive industry, Kelly said, and most of the capital flowing to local cell and gene therapy startups does not come from Philadelphia firms. Greater Philadelphia doesn’t have the “pools” of capital available in competing cities like Boston or San Francisco, he said. Local venture capital can help incubate smaller companies in the region and increase the number of companies popping up in Philadelphia each year, he said.

Philadelphia has the velocity to grow the industry and spawn new companies, Lau said, and she believes the region will continue to grow its cell and gene therapy ecosystem.

“We like the talent that is here, but we want, we need, more,” she said. “And we are hungry organizations that just require more feeding, more capital, more people, more systems in place.”
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2123  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2020, 8:35 PM
SEFTA's Avatar
SEFTA SEFTA is offline
Philly Pholly
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 804
SOUTH BROAD STREET

I believe there were a couple other low rise proposed.
500 S Broad, I don't have any real renderings of.

S Broad Street 11-13-20 b
__________________
Trump is a bag of S**t
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2124  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2020, 3:51 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
Good news for both the city and suburbs

Navy Yard returns to its roots while some Philly start-ups depart for the suburbs

Quote:
Twenty years after far-sighted officials began marketing the former naval base in South Philadelphia as the Navy Yard business center for growing private firms, its largest employer is — the Navy.

Of the 15,000 men and women who officials say work in the new and repurposed buildings on the Delaware River at the foot of Broad Street (up from 10,000 seven years ago), nearly 4,000 work for the U.S. Navy.

It’s by far the base’s largest employer, ahead of such corporations as Urban Outfitters (No. 2, with just over 2,000 staff on site), GlaxoSmithKline, Axalta, Tastykake, Jefferson Health, RevZilla, WuXi AppTec, and scores more.

The main military unit at the base, the Naval Surface Warfare Center, does engineering work for guided-missile cruisers and has added nearly 1,000 jobs at the yard since it broke off from another Navy unit in Bethesda, Md., five years ago.

The Navy has grown so much that it’s asking for 23 acres back, to supplement the 200 it still occupies, according to Jennifer Tran, on-site marketing director for the Philadelphia Authority for Industrial Development, or PAID, which created the site.

But can success and a handful of dominant employers spoil a good thing? With 95% of Navy Yard business space leased, are the Navy and the larger corporate employers crowding out the start-up and biotech firms that planners and promoters hoped to attract?

To be sure, there are worse problems to have besides a full shipload of tenants. And developers are working to create more space for life science companies, both at the Navy Yard and other city sites.

Rob Frantz, a former fighter pilot and ex-GlaxoSmithKline executive who moved his specialized pumps company, Kinetic Ceramics, to the yard from Northern California in 2016, has seen the naval yard crunch firsthand.

Frantz had wanted his dozen staffers to be part of “all the innovation going on at that part of the campus,” which he had observed in 2013 as an executive at Glaxo’s new building on Crescent Drive. Frantz saw the same energy as a visitor to state-funded Ben Franklin Technology Center of Southeastern Pennsylvania’s nearby Navy Yard headquarters, a font of start-up cash and advice.

In the spring, Frantz moved his growing company from the yard to Spring House, into a suburban campus that Horsham developer MRA Group has fitted into the former Rohm and Haas labs in Montgomery County. He says he once again feels that innovation energy at Spring House because of neighbors like Jefferson’s biotech center, another Philadelphia transplant.

There’s even a very familiar face — Mark de Grandpre, an executive with Ben Franklin Technology Partners who had worked out of the Naval Yard and had assisted Frantz’s company there. De Grandpre has lately been working out of the Spring House center and once again began helping Frantz.

The Spring House Innovation Park, as it’s called, also has stores, a brewpub, and a conference center, all on a more intimate scale than the Navy Yard and closer to many staffers’ suburban homes.

“COVID has really pushed people to the suburbs,” said de Grandpre, who adds cheerfully that he has never seen the local golf courses so crowded.

WuXi Biologics, a 2015 spin-off from China-based contract gene- and cell-therapy maker that employs 600 at its four Navy Yard buildings, also picked a suburban location. It’s placing up to 100 employees at a former Glaxo office center in Upper Merion Township, dubbed Discovery Labs, which, like Spring House, is also being redeveloped for small companies.

WuXi spokesperson Shi Ruyi cited “the talented workforce” in the neighborhood, where Merck, Glaxo, and other big drugmakers employ thousands. It also plans larger centers outside of Boston and New York.

Elsewhere in the suburbs, the Pennsylvania Biotechnology Center of Bucks County in Doylestown recently announced a nearly $20 million expansion. At Hankin Group’s Eagleview center in Exton, Chester County, “our neighbors are Frontage and Takeda and DSM Biomedical,” a contract manufacturer that competes with WuXi, says Rich Fitzgerald, chief financial officer at Immunome, a newly public cell-therapy maker.

Suburban sites offer “affordable space and a great talent base,” with “a lot of parking” for manufacturing workers, says Joerg Ahlgrimm, a former pharma executive who moved to the Main Line from California (via Switzerland) to serve as Discovery’s president in October. “These people are on site, they work in shifts, and that is often easy to achieve in a suburban location.”

For companies already set up outside the city, moving to Philly can be a tough sell. “I’m trying to convince [his company] to open a satellite office in Center City, where I live,” said Scott Applebaum, of Trevena Inc., in Chesterbrook. The firm hired him as chief legal and compliance officer in February, before raising $50 million from public investors to develop its painkiller Olinvyk.

The outer counties are cozy: “There’s a good mass of critical business people in the suburbs,” says Trevena’s chief financial officer Barry Shin, a veteran biotech investment banker who joined the company last year and previously worked nearby at Shire Pharmaceuticals. With “proximity to turnpike and major areas, it was a good place to draw talent from. There are so many pharma industries around here.”

Shin was squeezed from his former Philadelphia office at another biotech start-up, at 3000 Market St., the former Evening Bulletin building in Philly’s University City last year. “We got kicked out when Spark Therapeutics took the whole building,” Shin said.

The city’s dominant office landlord, Brandywine Realty Trust, had hoped to keep developing 3000 Market as a center for small firms like Context, but finally concluded it was better off signing a 12-year lease with Spark.

Spark, founded by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia gene therapists and purchased last winter by Swiss drug giant Roche for $4 billion, is also making a suburban move: It has agreed to buy a lab campus in Glenolden in Delaware County for its R&D center. University of Pennsylvania gene-therapy pioneer Carl June’s company, Tmunity, is locating its factory still further out, in Norristown.

“It’s great to see” so many moves by cash-rich biotechs, added Shin. “We’re not Cambridge, Mass., but it does remind me of the early days of Cambridge when so much talent was coming out of the local universities to start companies. Anyway, from Chesterbrook, we can still pull talent out of Philadelphia.”

Jerry Sweeney, Brandywine’s chief, hasn’t abandoned small biotechs. He’s turning six floors of its nearby Cira office tower in West Philadelphia into labs. About 34,000 square feet, a quarter of that total, is “preleased,” Sweeney told investors in a conference call last week. He hopes to start a proposed 500,000-square-foot “life science building” less than two blocks west at 3141 Market St. next year.

But, as at the Navy Yard, much of the demand for lab and office space in University City is from the big current employers — Penn, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the Wistar Institute, and other “anchor institutions,” as Sweeney calls them, and their many affiliates.

Questioned by analysts, Sweeney acknowledged that suburban competition, citing the Discovery site among its rivals.

Life sciences firms prefer new buildings, he added, but those take “two to three years to deliver.” That can be a problem in a red-hot market where gene- and cell-therapy firms without products or clients can raise millions in initial public stock offerings and want prime space fast.

But don’t count the city out. “The Navy Yard has been very successful, particularly in the life sciences space,” and still has room to grow, said developer John Gattuso, who helped lure business to the neighborhood as an executive of the former Liberty Property Trust. He’s now building a 137,000-square-foot biotech factory there for San Carlos, Calif.-based Iovance Biotherapeutics.

Pennovation, the University of Pennsylvania’s start-up and business-partnership center at the former DuPont paint factory across the Schuylkill from Penn’s main campus, is also expanding to a second building (also by MRA), with other units planned. The original Pennovation has been a haven for start-ups like Cocoa Press, Penn grad Evan Weinstein’s 3D chocolate-making-equipment developer.

Gattuso’s firm also has a fix for the Navy Yard: He’s proposed a 130,000-square-foot life sciences facility for multiple tenants at 2500 League Island. “In the 35 years I’ve been doing this, I’ve never seen an industry that has been as mobile as the life sciences sector, particularly gene and cell therapy,” he said.

Like Raleigh, N.C., Philadelphia is less expensive than the industry investment centers — Boston, San Francisco, and San Diego — and Gattuso says the city has experienced staffers who can help firms like Iovance move in fast.
https://www.inquirer.com/business/ph...-20201108.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2125  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2020, 3:52 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEFTA View Post
SOUTH BROAD STREET

I believe there were a couple other low rise proposed.
500 S Broad, I don't have any real renderings of.
The highrise at 500 S Broad Street is dead unfortunately. A handful of 4-story multimillion dollar townhomes are being built there:
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9417...7i16384!8i8192
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2126  
Old Posted Nov 14, 2020, 10:03 PM
SEFTA's Avatar
SEFTA SEFTA is offline
Philly Pholly
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 804
Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
The highrise at 500 S Broad Street is dead unfortunately. A handful of 4-story multimillion dollar townhomes are being built there:
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9417...7i16384!8i8192
I'm referring to proposed mixed-use tower on S. Broad at the Health Center building?
500 S Broad Street 11-14-20

500 S Broad Street 11-14-20 b

This is the only rendering I've seen. Well so far ich...
500 S Broad Street Tower 11-14-20

https://whyy.org/articles/150m-mixed...d-and-lombard/

https://www.phillytrib.com/news/loca...02496878a.html
__________________
Trump is a bag of S**t
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2127  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2020, 3:26 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
Quote:
Originally Posted by SEFTA View Post
I'm referring to proposed mixed-use tower on S. Broad at the Health Center building?
Wow, you're so right! I completely forgot about that project, and was confusing the lots. Hoping we do see more plans about this project soon.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2128  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2020, 3:28 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
Philly, where leaders’ good intentions don’t help a poor city grow

I won't post any snippets of this one, and will let you read it on your own if you're interested. The article can be a little over the top and overdramatic at times, but all-in-all makes a lot of good points.

Read article here:
https://www.inquirer.com/business/jo...-20201114.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2129  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2020, 5:09 PM
SEFTA's Avatar
SEFTA SEFTA is offline
Philly Pholly
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 804
and I see now he was referring to 740 S Broad that has been replaced with townhouses

S Broad Street -GREEN -S Broad -11-16-20

Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Wow, you're so right! I completely forgot about that project, and was confusing the lots. Hoping we do see more plans about this project soon.
__________________
Trump is a bag of S**t
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2130  
Old Posted Nov 16, 2020, 5:25 PM
mcgrath618's Avatar
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
Exhausted Drexel Student
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Rodgers Park, Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
Philly, where leaders’ good intentions don’t help a poor city grow

I won't post any snippets of this one, and will let you read it on your own if you're interested. The article can be a little over the top and overdramatic at times, but all-in-all makes a lot of good points.

Read article here:
https://www.inquirer.com/business/jo...-20201114.html
The biggest issue that this article raises is taxes. If Philly had a complete tax reform, it would solve a good chunk of our issues.
__________________
Philadelphia Transportation Thread: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=164129
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2131  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 1:35 PM
Jawnadelphia's Avatar
Jawnadelphia Jawnadelphia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Phila., PA
Posts: 2,502
Did you guys see what Alterra wants to do with the International House? They want to put a 215 foot building behind it, and add a building to the front to come to the sidewalk. Hoping they don't touch that brutalist facade too much though.

See more here:
https://www.instagram.com/p/CHoQBMdjN81/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2132  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 4:07 PM
Jayfar's Avatar
Jayfar Jayfar is offline
Midrise
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 1,094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jawnadelphia View Post
Did you guys see what Alterra wants to do with the International House? They want to put a 215 foot building behind it, and add a building to the front to come to the sidewalk. Hoping they don't touch that brutalist facade too much though.

See more here:
https://www.instagram.com/p/CHoQBMdjN81/
At a meeting just concluded, the Architectural Committee of the PHC unanimously recommended denial of the 'Review in Concept' application as submitted. It will next be considered by the Historical Commission itself. There is also a pending nomination of International House to the Phila. Register of Historic Places.

The pdf linked here includes both the Review in Concept application submission and the nomination: https://www.phila.gov/media/20201110...St-app-nom.pdf
__________________
Philadelphia Industrial & Commercial Heritage
A public Facebook group to promote appreciation of Greater Philadelphia's industrial and commercial history and advocate for historic preservation and adaptive re-use.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2133  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 5:42 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
^^There's a thread for that here guys:
https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/sho...d.php?t=244017
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2134  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 6:00 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
New COVID-19 restrictions in Philly and N.J. as city officials warn of potential for more deaths

Read more here:
https://www.inquirer.com/news/corona...-20201116.html

It’s all on the line for SEPTA and its riders, from service cuts to layoffs

Read more here:
https://www.inquirer.com/transportat...-20201117.html

Restaurant owners see Philly’s new indoor-dining ban as the final blow

Read more here:
https://www.inquirer.com/food/philad...-20201116.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2135  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 6:02 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
^^Anyone else have some major concerns about some of these things? New restrictions and closures for restaurants, gyms, some salons, music venues, etc.

I'm extremely concerned for the restaurant industry in Philadelphia. This could do irreversible damage for a lot of restaurants in the city.

I'm also extremely concerned for SEPTA. It seemed liked we were finally getting to a good spot - they were rebuilding stations, increasing services, talking about adding a few new lines to KOP and Phoenixville and maybe the Navy Yard and West Chester.... now we may be talking about reduced services, station closures, and the likes.

What do you guys think?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2136  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 6:33 PM
mcgrath618's Avatar
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
Exhausted Drexel Student
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Rodgers Park, Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by summersm343 View Post
^^Anyone else have some major concerns about some of these things? New restrictions and closures for restaurants, gyms, some salons, music venues, etc.

I'm extremely concerned for the restaurant industry in Philadelphia. This could do irreversible damage for a lot of restaurants in the city.

I'm also extremely concerned for SEPTA. It seemed liked we were finally getting to a good spot - they were rebuilding stations, increasing services, talking about adding a few new lines to KOP and Phoenixville and maybe the Navy Yard and West Chester.... now we may be talking about reduced services, station closures, and the likes.

What do you guys think?
Philly's restaurants will always bounce back, but this is certainly a major blow. Not to start a debate about COVID, but hasn't it been said that the majority of these new cases are coming out of college parties and people refusing to wear masks? Why must indoor dining be rid of?

As for SEPTA, they've been through worse. If we are to believe that all of this will be over by next summer, which is what I have been hearing, then SEPTA will start its new post-COVID rebuilding with a Federal administration much friendlier to rail than those prior.

The KOP Spur is dependent upon federal funds. I'm confident Biden will fund stuff like that.

The biggest hurdle I see for SEPTA though is getting people back. The biggest reason people wouldn't use Regional Rail before COVID was delays and wait times, and the biggest reason people wouldn't use the subway was because of safety and cleanliness. If SEPTA wants to get people back, they're going to have to solve both of those problems.

If the Keystone Corridor is taken from Amtrak today (which it very well might), regardless of who is chosen to operate it, it is a win for SEPTA. The harsh majority of delays on SEPTA are caused by Amtrak, and one less Amtrak dispatched line is a win here.

I think that a wonderful way for SEPTA to get some good PR and get people used to being on a train again post-COVID would be to run a steam excursion, not unlike Chicago's Joliet Rocket. The Reading & Northern will have it's RDG 2102 working in a month or two, and I think it would be wonderful for everyone involved to have it run over SEPTA's Main Line to Lansdale.
__________________
Philadelphia Transportation Thread: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=164129
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2137  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 6:43 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
Everyone do what they can to save Philly restaurants and spread the word!

'Outraged' Save Philly Restaurants coalition pens open letter to elected officials pushing for Covid-19 relief

More behind paywall here:
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...Pos=2#cxrecs_s

'Cataclysmic scenario': Philadelphia restaurants brace for layoffs, closures under new dining restrictions

More behind paywall here:
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...aurateurs.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2138  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 6:44 PM
summersm343's Avatar
summersm343 summersm343 is offline
Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 14,215
As demand for lab space rises, Philadelphia-area developers step up to meet the growth

Behind paywall. Who can read this? Anything new?
https://www.bizjournals.com/philadel...ut-region.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2139  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 7:30 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,025
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
Philly's restaurants will always bounce back, but this is certainly a major blow. Not to start a debate about COVID, but hasn't it been said that the majority of these new cases are coming out of college parties and people refusing to wear masks? Why must indoor dining be rid of?
Actually, dining in restaurants has an very significant correlation with covid spread.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/10/healt...ess/index.html

If you're eating, you can't wear a mask. And eating and talking without a mask, indoors, amongst strangers is exactly what should not be happening right now

This a terrible situation for those in the restaurant industry, but our city has an obligation to keep its citizens safe. Unfortunately, because the city can't borrow money to provide relief to the businesses and workers that will be harmed economically by these orders this becomes an even worse situation.

Federal government really needs to step up and provide some relief but unfortunately they've been MIA for the past half a year or so.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2140  
Old Posted Nov 17, 2020, 7:38 PM
mcgrath618's Avatar
mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
Exhausted Drexel Student
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Rodgers Park, Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by allovertown View Post
Actually, dining in restaurants has an very significant correlation with covid spread.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/10/healt...ess/index.html

If you're eating, you can't wear a mask. And eating and talking without a mask, indoors, amongst strangers is exactly what should not be happening right now

This a terrible situation for those in the restaurant industry, but our city has an obligation to keep its citizens safe. Unfortunately, because the city can't borrow money to provide relief to the businesses and workers that will be harmed economically by these orders this becomes an even worse situation.

Federal government really needs to step up and provide some relief but unfortunately they've been MIA for the past half a year or so.
Didn't know that. Thanks for citing a source.

Yeah the Feds really need to step up here.
__________________
Philadelphia Transportation Thread: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=164129
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 7:52 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.