HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #141  
Old Posted Feb 14, 2009, 7:37 PM
scottharding scottharding is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 1,632
The way that college is growing, that lawn will eventually be occupied by new buildings.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #142  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2009, 1:07 AM
kaneui kaneui is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,559
Not everyone is enthusiastic about the idea of building a Lake Powell water pipeline to provide for the needs of 500,000 potential residents in St. George and Washington County. As Western watershed snowpacks continue to shrink due to an increasingly warmer and drier climate, the battle over dwindling Colorado River water will only intensify between the numerous states that have a claim on it.

St. George has the dubious distinction of having the highest per capita water consumption in the region: 335 gallons per day--nearly twice that of other desert cities such as Phoenix and Tucson. With an average annual precipitation of only 8 inches, certainly a comprehensive water conservation plan should be a first priority. Otherwise, those expanses of green turf may end up reverting back to desert sage and scrub in the very near future.


http://www.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/...gePipeline.htm

http://www.alumni.utah.edu/continuum...r02/desert.htm

http://www.canyoncountryzephyr.com/o.../pipeline.html
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #143  
Old Posted Feb 15, 2009, 2:06 AM
scottharding scottharding is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 1,632
I'm sure that has a lot to do with the fact that St. George has one of the highest number of golf courses per capita in the country.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #144  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 2:04 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 16,430
Backdrop of Metro St. George. North or South, The Wasatch Front and emerging St. George Metro are unsurpassed when it comes to their immediate scenery.

by ap0013


by goobersmyn

St. George beltway will stretch the city -
Southern Parkway » First five miles of airport access now paved.

By Brandon Lomis
The Salt Lake Tribune


St. George » If you thought Utah's sunbelt already was loose, take a drive down I-15 toward the Arizona line and gaze east at the city's bulging waistline.

The Southern Parkway's first pavement is already there at Exit 2, and the earth movers are flattening hundreds of acres of state land for the coming waves of stucco and tile. This is where the nation's second-fastest-growing metro area spills next.

"It's a tremendous leap for our city," Mayor Daniel McArthur said. The four lanes will enable a doubling of the city's population without forcing everyone to cross a single bridge and pass an industrial park into downtown. In early 2011 it will deliver passengers to a new airport

that portends a boom in direct flights to the winter vacation spot.

"Transportation is what helps with quality of life," the mayor said.

At Exit 2, across the freeway from the new Sun River retirement community, the pace is quickening. Heavy equipment compacts a flat, dusty expanse of School and Institutional Trust Lands that will be sold off to benefit schools. This is a tract called the Southern Block, and SITLA plans 13,000 homes, 10 schools, a state welcome center and extensive parks over 6,200 acres along the beltway.

Snaking across the Mojave Desert hillocks and within cowpie-kicking distance of the Arizona Strip, Utah's freshest blacktop rolls in Old West loneliness to the airport site. Right now its divided lanes are paved 5 miles to a dirt trail called River Road, and that link will open to traffic in June.

Before long the parkway will be a throbbing artery serving thousands of residents -- eventually tens of thousands. It rolls 40 miles, past Sand Hollow Reservoir and up to State Route 9 at Hurricane. It's a big slice of taupe and red arroyos thick with quail, hidden by mesas from the rest of St. George.

Northeast in Hurricane, near the spot where the parkway will end, California refugee Mike Hayward leaned on a flatbed truck munching a free hot dog Thursday afternoon, the new Wal-Mart's opening day. Five hundred cars festered in the mid-80s spring heat, and the retiree from San Diego saw the future crawling past on SR-9.

It's a future when he no longer routinely drives 65 mph. It's a bit like San Diego.

"I don't see the traffic as ever being a problem ... now," Hayward said. "But they plan on building all this up. If it continues growing the way they say, we'll need another way."

Few of the newcomers complain about the traffic. Like Hayward, Connie Bishop said it's smooth going, so far. Mostly she and her husband drive into the desert to mountain bike near their winter home. They also keep a home in Silverton, Colo.

"When I drive, I don't see any problem," the two-month Sun River resident said.

The number crunchers predict serious traffic jams, though, and soon unless the roads keep up.

In St. George, McArthur said, 10,000 acres of state and private land await the parkway, potentially pushing the city toward 200,000 people. And that's just St. George. Washington City and Hurricane have their own swaths. Hurricane plans 40,000 homes along the south side of SR-9, across from the Wal-Mart, City Engineer Arthur LeBaron said. That's eight times as many homes as the city currently boasts, depending on a planned water pipeline from Lake Powell. SR-9's five lanes won't get all those people into the St. George metro core efficiently.

"If this gets to the point where it is too congested, then people would definitely choose the [belt] route," LeBaron said.

So far the state Transportation Commission has budgeted less than $200 million for the $475 million project. Road planners are negotiating for partnerships with local governments and real estate developers to help cover the rest.

The U.S. Census count for Washington County has nearly doubled to about 140,000 people this decade (150,000 by local estimates), though the national economic downturn last year slowed the annual growth rate to 3 percent. The Dixie Metropolitan Planning Organization estimates that with economic recovery the population will double again before 2035, and state planners estimate an even faster doubling.

Though I-15 and SR-9 will broaden to meet demand, the Southern Parkway is the only major new thoroughfare on the horizon.

A few years ago, when UDOT planners said they expected to open the new interchange at Exit 2 this spring, people wondered why. It was just more desert on the road to Las Vegas.

Then came Sun River, a self-contained retirement town where the residents all wear name tags and the tee times are easy.

"People said, 'What are you building an interchange all the way down there for?' " regional UDOT spokesman Kevin Kitchen said. "By the time we got that ready to open, development had already overtaken it.

"It's really about beating the growth curve down here."

The parkway is planned in five phases to be built as funding comes available. The second phase, stretching four miles east of River Road, is expected to open before the airport does in two years.

Southern Parkway outlook
40 miles.


5 miles open by June.

$475 million total cost.

70,000 daily car trips between I-15 and the airport by 2040.

Skirting 50,000 or more homes at buildout.


Reply With Quote
     
     
  #145  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 7:43 PM
SLCforme SLCforme is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 403
now is the time to instate some urban growth boundaries for that metro, or it will be a massive sprawling cluster of humanity that has engulfed all the natural beauty around it. That's the problem with beautiful places, lot's of people want to live there thus making it less beautiful...
__________________
"Orthodoxy means not thinking-not needing to think. Orthodoxy is unconsciousness."
George Orwell, "1984"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #146  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 8:50 PM
Future Mayor's Avatar
Future Mayor Future Mayor is offline
Vote for me in 2019!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 4,803
Or if the citizens and land owners are reluctant to accept growth boundaries there needs to at least be a change in development patterns. Creating a development culture that provide more open space within the same amount of acres with smaller lot sizes.

From this


To this


Obviously this is just an example, but it would allow for the preservation of much more of the natural beauty that attracts people to the area.

Images courtesy of the Center for Green Space Design.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #147  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 8:57 PM
aspiringArchitect aspiringArchitect is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 191
I agree with you Future Mayor. Personally, I would much rather live in option #2 where there is plenty of green space and trails rather than the first one, where all it is is houses.

Also, isn't Envision Dixie commited to getting southwest Utah on the right track when it comes to development? They have put some thought into it, from what I can tell from their website. I really hope that mayors from around the area look to them for advice.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #148  
Old Posted Mar 23, 2009, 9:27 PM
Future Mayor's Avatar
Future Mayor Future Mayor is offline
Vote for me in 2019!
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Posts: 4,803
I know that with my job I am going to be attempting to convey the importance of option 2 rather than option 1. I think now, with the economy and building boom slowing down that it is a good time for cities and regional planning organizations to change the direction of post WWII development patterns and start to better utilize land and open space.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #149  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 1:12 AM
scrapernerd scrapernerd is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 65
????

I have an opened question about growth boundaries and green space
First for green space. I agree it is nice and I would much perfer to live in a neighborhood with it but after the real estate developer is done with that nieghborhood who is incharge of maintainence of the green space? is it the government? or are the companies? And if a company puts in alot of green space will that limit who can buy in those neighborhoods? the person building on that land is going to charge more for each unit to recoup the cost!!

And on growth boundaries? I visited my aunt in Beaverton a couple years ago and growth boundaries forced development to a point that a 5 story nursing home is now what she look at in her back yard!! It seems that is bad zoning, (personaly I would have enjoyed watching its construction but after that i would be a little annoyed)

and then if you happen to own land that other people decide you cant build on does that not restrict indivdual rights?? I'm not saying there isn't approvals and certain builing conditions but to limit it forever is basically making that person own land that has lossed all value?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #150  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 2:08 AM
TANGELD_SLC's Avatar
TANGELD_SLC TANGELD_SLC is offline
The World Is Welcome Here
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: SL,UT
Posts: 884
I think St. George needs to wake up right now and not let itself become an ugly sprawling mess like Utah Valley has become.

The city has so much natural beauty and potential for amazing growth, and they need to start building an urban core NOW so they don't get screwed later on. I'd like to see it become a metro of over 1 million, but not if it ends up being another Provo.
__________________
Espavo!

Plyg, Metrosexual, & AVENian
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #151  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2009, 12:06 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 16,430
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANGELD_SLC View Post
I think St. George needs to wake up right now and not let itself become an ugly sprawling mess like Utah Valley has become.

The city has so much natural beauty and potential for amazing growth, and they need to start building an urban core NOW so they don't get screwed later on. I'd like to see it become a metro of over 1 million, but not if it ends up being another Provo.
C'mon now TANGELD, that's a bit of a loaded statement, especially for a lovable goober like yourself. St. George, has established an historical core that it has been expanding and adding to for quite some time now. A long list of projects have been completed on and around it's traditional main street and town square. All of the projects are of a charming historical design and fit in very well with the city's history.

I don't consider Salt Lake Valley to be a mess, and certainly Provo and Utah Valley are no worse. Both are in need of adjustments, and I continue to see allot of progress in all of the Wasatch metro.

Despite the fact that Ut. Valley is the fastest growing area in the state, and one of the six fastest in the nation, it is still keeping pace quite nicely compared with the rest of the continent. I mean, how many dozens of major transportation projects are currently under construction or about to begin. Maybe you had better clarify yourself, before a few Provo/Ut. Valley forumers like Wasatch One looks at your post, LOL.

First of all, I take great pride in the entire metro. All three of the north to south sectors, and of course the east and west of Tooele and Summitt have beautiful Vistas. Perhaps none are more beautiful or striking than Ut. Valleys. Also, of the Davis, Salt Lake and Utah Metros, I don't think any have as large a percentage of towns with the traditional Main Streets still in tact. From Payson to Lehi, Utah Valley has far fewer of the West Valley/Taylorsville type situations than Salt Lake Valley. As far as Provo, I was just there for most of the afternoon on Saturday. I was very impressed with the many changes and additions that have been made in the past few years. There were major and very attractive projects everywhere I went from south to north. Downtown had become much more festive, with new building projects, many recently restored historical italianate store fronts, and outdoor restaurant seating. I was even shocked by all of the people out and about at the new Riverwood community and village center. Of course, it was Saturday and a beautiful Spring day, still one could not help but notice the obvious signs of a very intelligent, clean, vibrant, and industrious people everywhere in plain sight. I didn't have to search diligently for a positive impression of Provo, and I certainly wouldn't have to search for beauty, orderly infrastructure, or attractive projects in Alpine or Highland. The orderly cleanliness and scenic beauty of most of Utah Valley is pretty apparent.

One of the things I find most amusing of all the common complaints on the forum is of Eagle Mtn. First of all, with the exception of Daybreak, I don't think there is a recent town in the Metro that has a better or more attractive layout. Sure, it grew too fast and therefore needs a viable and efficient connection to it's neighbors of Lehi and the greater metro(and those connecting arterials are under construction or about to begin). However, the town itself could teach a boat-load to some of the layouts in Salt Lake or the regional Mountain West forum in general.

I think I'll post this over on the Provo thread, so if someone there wants to respond they can.

Last edited by delts145; Mar 24, 2009 at 12:53 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #152  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2009, 11:00 PM
poodledoodledude's Avatar
poodledoodledude poodledoodledude is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by TANGELD_SLC View Post
I think St. George needs to wake up right now and not let itself become an ugly sprawling mess like Utah Valley has become.

The city has so much natural beauty and potential for amazing growth, and they need to start building an urban core NOW so they don't get screwed later on. I'd like to see it become a metro of over 1 million, but not if it ends up being another Provo.
what do you have against provo? seems like your posts are pretty slanted against this little city 50 miles south of salt lake. if it's the "people" you will find "strange" ones anywhere.

i think it's a great place to live. i like st. george equally well. i believe that no matter WHAT city it is in utah, if one gets recognized, it makes us ALL look good! be that ogden, salt lake, provo, or st. george.

whether you like provo or not, it's still an IMPORTANT city for OUR state, and i think people forget about that. provo has always been the "ugly stepsister" of utah's cities. i think that perception is changing now. i'm seeing less and less anti-provo signs and seeing more and more pro-provo signs...so to speak. with provos new development going on, it can only help the region.
just my two cents...

poodledoodledude
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #153  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 1:04 AM
blm3034L!fe's Avatar
blm3034L!fe blm3034L!fe is offline
Denver is the M/W Father!
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: IN THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY WHERE HOPS AND CANNABIS REIGN SUPREME!
Posts: 2,021
Quote:
Originally Posted by poodledoodledude View Post
what do you have against provo? seems like your posts are pretty slanted against this little city 50 miles south of salt lake. if it's the "people" you will find "strange" ones anywhere.

i think it's a great place to live. i like st. george equally well. i believe that no matter WHAT city it is in utah, if one gets recognized, it makes us ALL look good! be that ogden, salt lake, provo, or st. george.

whether you like provo or not, it's still an IMPORTANT city for OUR state, and i think people forget about that. provo has always been the "ugly stepsister" of utah's cities. i think that perception is changing now. i'm seeing less and less anti-provo signs and seeing more and more pro-provo signs...so to speak. with provos new development going on, it can only help the region.
just my two cents...

poodledoodledude
Last I checked From Downtown Provo to Downtown SLC was 42 Miles. Where did the additional 8 Miles come from? And IMHO as long as BYU is located in Provo, it's reputation will remain the same. It's only an opinion but believe me things in that City will not change even if Hell Freezes over!!!
__________________
We're either progressing or retrograding all the time.

There is no such thing as remaining constant.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #154  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 5:48 AM
Venice Venice is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by blm3034L!fe View Post
Last I checked From Downtown Provo to Downtown SLC was 42 Miles. Where did the additional 8 Miles come from? And IMHO as long as BYU is located in Provo, it's reputation will remain the same. It's only an opinion but believe me things in that City will not change even if Hell Freezes over!!!
Bow Down when you come to my town!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #155  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2009, 6:49 AM
IFguy's Avatar
IFguy IFguy is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 329
http://www.localnews8.com/Global/story.asp?S=10072608

Doesn't seem like the growth in Dixie will slow anytime soon, nice to be on the same list. As I recall we usually bump into each other on almost all of these growth lists.
__________________
IF 2010 Census

I.F. City: 56,813
I.F. Metro: 132,073
I.F. Bingham CSA: 178,025
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #156  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2009, 5:12 PM
Justnslcsugarhood.'s Avatar
Justnslcsugarhood. Justnslcsugarhood. is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 294
I love st. George. I love that it's growing but do you guys think it's doing it responsibly?
Are there any tax incentives to xeriscape yards, because I know in St. George they are giving you guys tax cuts to get more people using solar power which is awesome in my opinion.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #157  
Old Posted Mar 28, 2009, 6:34 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 16,430
Good question Justn, I was just down there a couple of weeks ago. I did notice some nice landscape projects that were under development. They were using the colored pumice stone and drought resistant shrubbery. I'm not sure about tax incentives though.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #158  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2009, 5:44 AM
Urban_logic's Avatar
Urban_logic Urban_logic is offline
I'm an Urbanizer, baby!
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Goias, Brazil ~ starting summer 09'
Posts: 355
All this talk of green space is rediculous. It's St George for goodness sakes!!! It is RED space, not green space...

Seriously, though, I do hope that St George preserves all the beauty around it and includes plenty of "red space" in its future development.

To the question as to who does the up-keep on green (and red ) space, the answer is no one. It is just open land. Possibly the forest service may oversee it, but there really isn't anything to keep up because that's the point - it's open, natural land.

Btw, Tangled, I don't know how I would feel about being called a "goober" lol. Are you gunna take that?

Ok, I'm done with the funnies for today
__________________
Urbanize, or get left behind!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #159  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2009, 6:03 AM
SLC Projects's Avatar
SLC Projects SLC Projects is offline
Bring out the cranes...
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 6,108
Quote:
Originally Posted by blm3034L!fe View Post
Last I checked From Downtown Provo to Downtown SLC was 42 Miles. Where did the additional 8 Miles come from?

The 8 additional miles comes from when you miss the turn off exit and have to make a U-turn at the next ecxit and go back.
__________________
1. "Wells Fargo Building" 24-stories 422 FT 1998
2. "LDS Church Office Building" 28-stories 420 FT 1973
3. "111 South Main" 24-stories 387 FT 2016
4. "99 West" 30-stories 375 FT 2011
5. "Key Bank Tower" 27-stories 351 FT 1976
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #160  
Old Posted Mar 30, 2009, 6:05 AM
TANGELD_SLC's Avatar
TANGELD_SLC TANGELD_SLC is offline
The World Is Welcome Here
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: SL,UT
Posts: 884
Quote:
Originally Posted by poodledoodledude View Post
what do you have against provo? seems like your posts are pretty slanted against this little city 50 miles south of salt lake. if it's the "people" you will find "strange" ones anywhere.

i think it's a great place to live. i like st. george equally well. i believe that no matter WHAT city it is in utah, if one gets recognized, it makes us ALL look good! be that ogden, salt lake, provo, or st. george.

whether you like provo or not, it's still an IMPORTANT city for OUR state, and i think people forget about that. provo has always been the "ugly stepsister" of utah's cities. i think that perception is changing now. i'm seeing less and less anti-provo signs and seeing more and more pro-provo signs...so to speak. with provos new development going on, it can only help the region.
just my two cents...

poodledoodledude
I don;t have anything about the people in Provo, only how the city has appeared to just grow without any responsibility or sustainable development, but I'm really meaning most of Utah valley, not just Provo.

I just don't want St. G to end up a sprawling mess, is all.
__________________
Espavo!

Plyg, Metrosexual, & AVENian
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:09 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.