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  #2521  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2020, 2:42 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
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Originally Posted by Ned.B View Post
I am fairly certain that Asbury Plaza is not clad in anything and that is exposed structural concrete. I think building is all structural shear walls with very few or no structural columns. As such it would be very difficult to add anymore than add a few additional windows and overclad the building as a giant aluminum box or fake glass box. Neither of those seem likely because I doubt the expense would justify any minor increase in desirability or rents. I think a full demolition will be unlikely unless it's replacement is on the scale of One Chicago Square.

My guess is as long as there are renters out there who don't mind the building's appearance and don't care that their unit has only 1, 2, or 3 windows, or property values in Chicago become great enough to purchase a large perfectly viable, and bunker like concrete building and then tear it down, that Asbury isn't going away for some time.
aside from the parking garage, it has a certain soviet style elegance to it. and there will always be demand for well maintained and inexpensive housing so I bet it survives as is.
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  #2522  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2020, 2:29 AM
Ravenswood Ravenswood is offline
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In Chicago, residential high-rises are mostly reinforced concrete but office towers are mostly steel-framed.

Why is this so?

It’s not always the case. For example, 311 S. Wacker is a concrete office building. But it seems to be a general rule.

Some have suggested that concrete deadens noise better. But I’ve lived in concrete high-rises that are still plenty loud. I’ve also heard that steel offers larger floor plates for office uses.

Thoughts?
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  #2523  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2020, 2:31 AM
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BVictor1 BVictor1 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenswood View Post
In Chicago, residential high-rises are mostly reinforced concrete but office towers are mostly steel-framed.

Why is this so?

It’s not always the case. For example, 311 S. Wacker is a concrete office building. But it seems to be a general rule.

Some have suggested that concrete deadens noise better. But I’ve lived in concrete high-rises that are still plenty loud. I’ve also heard that steel offers larger floor plates for office uses.

Thoughts?

Reinforced concrete is less pliable and is better for lateral forces (wind) in residential towers. Less sway...
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  #2524  
Old Posted Nov 24, 2020, 3:36 AM
Bombardier Bombardier is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravenswood View Post
In Chicago, residential high-rises are mostly reinforced concrete but office towers are mostly steel-framed.

Why is this so?

It’s not always the case. For example, 311 S. Wacker is a concrete office building. But it seems to be a general rule.

Some have suggested that concrete deadens noise better. But I’ve lived in concrete high-rises that are still plenty loud. I’ve also heard that steel offers larger floor plates for office uses.

Thoughts?
Several reasons...
- Steel makes sense for offices because steel allows for a larger bay spacing that is more conducive to office layouts.
- Steel allows for easier reconfiguration for changing tenants over time.
- Steel more easily allows for the taller floor to floor height of office structures compared to concrete as the formwork takes more time to install when the floor to floor height is taller.
- Concrete allows for plumbing and electrical to be cast into the slabs which prevents the need for a full dropped ceiling and allows for a shorter floor to floor height than an office use, thereby saving cost.
- Post tensioned concrete is generally used in Chicago and allows for significant cost savings over traditionally reinforced concrete. This makes residential concrete structures more economical, but does not allow for offices to be concrete because post tensioned concrete cannot be easily cored through during future tenant buildouts. (311 S Wacker and 10 S - 30S Wacker are all traditionally reinforced concrete structures).

I'm sure others can expand on this list.
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  #2525  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2020, 3:01 PM
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harryc harryc is offline
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Looking N Up State, from IBM plaza


Looking N Up Dearborn from Marina City


Looking E down Chicago




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  #2526  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:52 PM
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