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  #261  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2019, 8:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Franco401 View Post
That system would work a lot better than dumping a truck full of wood in someone's driveway and getting them to gather all their friends to hand it into the basement.

Indeed! I suppose wood pellets are the equivalent to coal these days.
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  #262  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2019, 11:15 PM
ILoveHalifax ILoveHalifax is offline
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Well speaking for us OLD folks - I'm 72 - I remember the house we lived in in Sydney NS '51 and '52 had a coal bin and the house we moved to in Rockingham had a coal bin but that was the first thing dad had done was changing that furnace to oil - that would be '53
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  #263  
Old Posted Dec 29, 2019, 1:40 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Great info, guys! You still see those trap doors outside older buildings from time to time, but there seems to be less these days.

The 1950s was the decade I figured would have been when people were switching to oil, paralleling the railroad industry, whether coincidental or not. It was a little before my time, though.

When we moved into our house in the late sixties, it had an oil furnace with a central grate for the heat in the downstairs hallway. You can imagine how frosty the upstairs rooms were in the wintertime. In the seventies my dad had the house converted to forced hot air, the upstairs rooms were still a little chilly, but better than before.
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  #264  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2019, 1:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Franco401 View Post
That system would work a lot better than dumping a truck full of wood in someone's driveway and getting them to gather all their friends to hand it into the basement.
Thankfully we have these "wood chutes" now.

https://youtu.be/JnO4Wo-mG9s
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  #265  
Old Posted Dec 30, 2019, 8:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Jstaleness View Post
Thankfully we have these "wood chutes" now.

https://youtu.be/JnO4Wo-mG9s
We moved in to a house in 1970 that had a coal furnace and coal stove. It was a cold winter; the next winter there was a oil stove and oil furnace. Much better.
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  #266  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 1:52 AM
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Not sure what thread the discussion was in but there was some talk about this vinyl-clad building on Inglis. Here's what it looks without the siding:





More here: https://halifaxbloggers.ca/noticedin...0/02/cornered/

There are so many historic buildings in Halifax that could look so much better than they do.
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  #267  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 2:53 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Yes, I read that blog yesterday. He says it was painted stucco in his photo, which has to mean that it was masonry underneath, I think. Definitely looks better than siding (anything looks better than siding IMHO).

Also of note is that the Halifax Municipal archives had recently uploaded pics of the Bollard House that he discusses.

And, of course, the Pentagon Building, which I think should be reconstructed, somewhere, in some form. I think it would be a nice addition to the reconfigured Cogswell area if it were to ever happen (which I have no delusions that it will) - it would be a cool nod to what used to be there.
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  #268  
Old Posted Mar 5, 2020, 4:51 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Originally Posted by someone123 View Post
Not sure what thread the discussion was in but there was some talk about this vinyl-clad building on Inglis. Here's what it looks without the siding:


More here: https://halifaxbloggers.ca/noticedin...0/02/cornered/

There are so many historic buildings in Halifax that could look so much better than they do.
Found the thread: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...is#post7780900
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  #269  
Old Posted May 7, 2020, 2:24 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Today is the 75th anniversary of the VE day riots in Halifax:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-...sary-1.5551158

I remember hearing the stories from my father, who was a 14-year-old kid at the time. Of course my father being who he was, would have been out in the thick of it, for the spectacle that it turned out to be. His stories pretty much were as described in the article, but from a perspective of a kid who basically had no fear. What I remember the most is that one of the soldiers who had been looting said to him something to the effect of... "Hey kid, here you go" - and tossed him a watch that he had just looted from somewhere. As a somewhat poor kid living in the rough areas of downtown Halifax at the time, it meant a lot to him that the soldier would do that for him, even though the circumstances were somewhat dubious.

FWIW, if you go through the Halifax Municipal Archives and NS archives sites, there are more photos of the 'action' of that day.
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  #270  
Old Posted May 7, 2020, 2:48 PM
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Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
Today is the 75th anniversary of the VE day riots in Halifax:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-...sary-1.5551158

I remember hearing the stories from my father, who was a 14-year-old kid at the time. Of course my father being who he was, would have been out in the thick of it, for the spectacle that it turned out to be. His stories pretty much were as described in the article, but from a perspective of a kid who basically had no fear. What I remember the most is that one of the soldiers who had been looting said to him something to the effect of... "Hey kid, here you go" - and tossed him a watch that he had just looted from somewhere. As a somewhat poor kid living in the rough areas of downtown Halifax at the time, it meant a lot to him that the soldier would do that for him, even though the circumstances were somewhat dubious.

FWIW, if you go through the Halifax Municipal Archives and NS archives sites, there are more photos of the 'action' of that day.
I remember my Grandfather telling me about his Wartime experiences living on Liverpool street. My Grandfather was the eldest of seven siblings and ran a moving company during the war. He tried to volunteer for the forces but he was told that because he was the father of three young Kids ( my Dad being the middle kid) and a provider of a vital civilian service (trucking)he would sit out the War here in Halifax.

That's not to say my Grandparents did not do their part. Shortly after Canada declared War on Germany the RCMP showed up at their door on Liverpool street and confirmed that it was three bedroom house with three little kids. The RCMP then introduced two RCN officers to my grandparents and handed over some ration cards so my Grandmother could feed and cook for the new roommates.


My Grandmother was a Valley Baptist and did not take kindly to drink.
While serving dinner during the riots my Grandmother apparently interrogated her RCN roommates to be assured that "her boys" had nothing to do with the riots. "No Ma'am " was apparently their reply. Later that evening my Grandmother asked that her sewing machine be brought down so she could mend the Officers uniforms for the formal Victory Parade . My Grandfather almost wrenched his back when he went to pick up the sit down sewing machine. When he looked in the draws he found at least 6 bottles of liberated booze. He quickly told the boys to get it out of the house or they would wish they were back at Sea fighting Submarines. My Grandmother was not told until the seventies. She had a good laugh .
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  #271  
Old Posted May 7, 2020, 6:07 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Originally Posted by Dartguard View Post
I remember my Grandfather telling me about his Wartime experiences living on Liverpool street. My Grandfather was the eldest of seven siblings and ran a moving company during the war. He tried to volunteer for the forces but he was told that because he was the father of three young Kids ( my Dad being the middle kid) and a provider of a vital civilian service (trucking)he would sit out the War here in Halifax.

That's not to say my Grandparents did not do their part. Shortly after Canada declared War on Germany the RCMP showed up at their door on Liverpool street and confirmed that it was three bedroom house with three little kids. The RCMP then introduced two RCN officers to my grandparents and handed over some ration cards so my Grandmother could feed and cook for the new roommates.


My Grandmother was a Valley Baptist and did not take kindly to drink.
While serving dinner during the riots my Grandmother apparently interrogated her RCN roommates to be assured that "her boys" had nothing to do with the riots. "No Ma'am " was apparently their reply. Later that evening my Grandmother asked that her sewing machine be brought down so she could mend the Officers uniforms for the formal Victory Parade . My Grandfather almost wrenched his back when he went to pick up the sit down sewing machine. When he looked in the draws he found at least 6 bottles of liberated booze. He quickly told the boys to get it out of the house or they would wish they were back at Sea fighting Submarines. My Grandmother was not told until the seventies. She had a good laugh .
Ha! That's a great story! Thanks so much for sharing it!!
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  #272  
Old Posted Jun 12, 2020, 8:37 PM
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I found this shot interesting:


Source


Blowers Street below Barrington. Ralston Building visible in the background with a small stone building in front of it.
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  #273  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2020, 2:03 PM
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I had forgotten about that little stone-faced building. For some reason I have a sense it wasn't a masonry building itself but just stone on the front. I forget whether it was a law office or something else.
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  #274  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2020, 5:04 PM
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I had forgotten about that little stone-faced building. For some reason I have a sense it wasn't a masonry building itself but just stone on the front. I forget whether it was a law office or something else.
I don't remember it at all. I do have a vague memory of some buildings on the MetroPark site but I think they were on the Hollis side. I also have clear memories of the TexPark, including the gas station inside, which I thought was amazing for some reason when I was a little kid.
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  #275  
Old Posted Jun 13, 2020, 7:19 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Here's a zoomable (from the archives website) aerial view of that area from the mid 1950s:

https://novascotia.ca/archives/NSIS/...es.asp?ID=1209

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  #276  
Old Posted Jun 14, 2020, 9:24 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Here's an interesting link I stumbled upon, the history of CHNS radio station in Halifax.

https://www.broadcasting-history.ca/.../radio/chns-fm

I hadn't known that CHNS originally broadcasted from The Carleton Hotel in 1926. Neat stuff for a history geek like myself.

Also, other NS stations are covered on the site:
https://www.broadcasting-history.ca/.../nova-scotia-0
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  #277  
Old Posted Jun 18, 2020, 4:41 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is online now
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
I had forgotten about that little stone-faced building. For some reason I have a sense it wasn't a masonry building itself but just stone on the front. I forget whether it was a law office or something else.
Wasn't there an old book store along that stretch (where Metropark exists) as well? My memories are not so clear about that area.
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