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  #121  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2021, 3:42 AM
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[IMG]Soledad Street San Antonio by Raul Medina III, on Flickr[/IMG]
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  #122  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2021, 3:06 PM
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Nice before shot, Raul. Do you have a "base" photo that you took a few years ago showing the whole skyline? (I'm sure you have a few of them.) It would be a good project to take the same photo every few months with matching lighting as new buildings are added, then create an animation
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  #123  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2021, 9:10 PM
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I personally would like a little more glass, but I wouldn’t be mad if the project was built in with the design we originally saw.

I used to prefer more glass as a design element as well, but have come to believe that relying too much on glass seems somewhat of a lazy design alternative. I’ve grown to appreciate more classic architecture such as the neo-gothic Tower Life Building.

Another design feature (that I believe is uniquely San Antonio) are the earthy colors and materials used in design and construction of projects in Downtown San Antonio. When people travel to San Antonio, there are things that are impressed upon them. San Antonio is the gateway between the United States and Latin America, and living or traveling there you feel that. The various terra-cotta hues give San Antonio a sense of place. Many cities have cookie cutter glass high rise projects. But I remember when I lived in San Antonio, I loved walking downtown to catch the warm colors created from the late afternoon Sun, illuminating the buildings. I think it’s something that locals there should cherish and nurture.

San Antonio is a very unique and beautiful city amongst American cities, that can both embrace growth, and encourage quality projects that enhance and preserves its uniqueness.
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Last edited by urban_encounter; Jan 3, 2021 at 5:17 AM.
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  #124  
Old Posted Jan 2, 2021, 9:54 PM
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I used to prefer more glass as a design element as well, but have come to believe that relying too much on glass seems somewhat a lazy design alternative. I’ve grown to appreciate more classic architecture such as the neo-gothic Tower Life Building.

Another design feature (that I believe is uniquely San Antonio) are the earthy colors and materials used in design and construction of new projects in Downtown San Antonio. When people travel to San Antonio there are things that are impressed on them. San Antonio is the gateway between the United States and Central and South America and living or traveling there you feel that. The various terra-cotta hues give San Antonio a sense of place. Many cities have cookie cutter glass high rise projects. But I remember when I lived in San Antonio, I loved walking downtown to catch the warm colors created from the late afternoon Sun, illuminating the buildings. I think it’s something that locals there should cherish and nurture.

San Antonio is a very unique and beautiful city amongst American cities, that can both embrace growth, and encourage quality projects that enhance and preserves its uniqueness.
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  #125  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2021, 2:49 PM
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Glass buildings are boring and commonplace. I don't love this building, but I do appreciate that it's not all glass. New York City is starting to get a lot of glass buildings, especially in Hudson Yards, and while NYC is huge the glass is starting to conflict with the uniqueness of the New York skyline. Stay interesting, San Antonio.
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  #126  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2021, 3:23 PM
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Glass buildings are boring and commonplace. I don't love this building, but I do appreciate that it's not all glass. New York City is starting to get a lot of glass buildings, especially in Hudson Yards, and while NYC is huge the glass is starting to conflict with the uniqueness of the New York skyline. Stay interesting, San Antonio.
Totalllly agree! Glass is great and all, but some cities have so so much blue glass everywhere--It can look pedestrian/cheap. Keep it classy, SA.
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  #127  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2021, 3:32 AM
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I wouldn't call the Frost tower "boaring" or "commonplace" quite the opposite actually, I call it "badass!" But that's me, there are some people here that just HAVE to be "that guy", when everyone says "up" they want to agree, but will still say "down". They can't help themselves, quite comical actually! Anyway, someone here called the brick in this building stunning. I think that's the perfect word for this building! Absolutely stunning! But, there is a way to improve on a already stunning building..... MORE GLASS!!!!!!
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  #128  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2021, 4:23 AM
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This isn't really a glass tower, though. The facade materials are masonry (brick) and exposed concrete. Only the windows are glass, obviously. It's not the same as the Frost Tower, which is a glass curtain wall facade system.
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  #129  
Old Posted Jan 14, 2021, 2:28 PM
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I wouldn't call the Frost tower "boaring" or "commonplace" quite the opposite actually, I call it "badass!" But that's me, there are some people here that just HAVE to be "that guy", when everyone says "up" they want to agree, but will still say "down". They can't help themselves, quite comical actually! Anyway, someone here called the brick in this building stunning. I think that's the perfect word for this building! Absolutely stunning! But, there is a way to improve on a already stunning building..... MORE GLASS!!!!!!
I don't expect anyone to remember, but I have said that Frost is an exception to the sucky glass building rule. I agree that it is badass. But that's because it has a great design, not just because it's glass. It's quite a stretch of the imagination to say (or imply) that because Frost is a badass building that all glass buildings are as good as it.

How about this? More badass glass buildings with great designs. Fewer unimaginative and boring glass buildings. And more buildings with great designs in general.

I actually like the design of 305 Soledad the way it is better than a plain glass building. I give it a 6 out of 10.
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  #130  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 9:12 PM
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Saw this picture on the skyscraper forum photo thread for Minneapolis, MN. This building looks a little like the propose tower.

Photo credit: Todd Jacobson
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  #131  
Old Posted Jan 25, 2021, 9:14 PM
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  #132  
Old Posted Feb 25, 2021, 10:03 PM
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Here's how much it could cost to live in $107M 32-story downtown tower

By Mitchell Parton – Reporter, San Antonio Business Journal
Feb 25, 2021


The 32-story apartment tower proposed on Soledad Street in downtown San Antonio will be on the high end of rental rates for the city, according to new details project developers presented to a city board Thursday morning.

The tower is anticipated to begin construction this summer and will cost $107 million to build, or $300 per square foot.

The project will add 351 residential units to the city's core, along with 7,250 square feet of retail space and a six-level parking garage with 456 spaces.

The board of the Houston Street Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone approved $1 million in funding toward a San Antonio Water System fee waiver.

Mark Jensen, vice president for Weston Urban, told the board that all the units will be on the high end of the city's market rate.

However, the developers are seeking incentives from Center City Housing Incentive Policy under the Center City Development and Operations Department, which has a cap of $2.75 per square foot on rental properties for its tax reimbursement grant.

While Weston Urban has not revealed unit sizes, a 500-square-foot unit, for example, could cost up to $1,375 under this restriction.

Jensen said the retail space will be targeted at activating the intersection of Pecan, Travis, Soledad and North Main streets with one or two restaurant users and some service-oriented tenants.

The tower received approval from the Historic and Design Review Commission late last year.
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  #133  
Old Posted Feb 26, 2021, 9:19 PM
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Originally Posted by babysal View Post
By Mitchell Parton – Reporter, San Antonio Business Journal
Feb 25, 2021


The 32-story apartment tower proposed on Soledad Street in downtown San Antonio will be on the high end of rental rates for the city, according to new details project developers presented to a city board Thursday morning.

The tower is anticipated to begin construction this summer and will cost $107 million to build, or $300 per square foot.

The project will add 351 residential units to the city's core, along with 7,250 square feet of retail space and a six-level parking garage with 456 spaces.

The board of the Houston Street Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone approved $1 million in funding toward a San Antonio Water System fee waiver.

Mark Jensen, vice president for Weston Urban, told the board that all the units will be on the high end of the city's market rate.

However, the developers are seeking incentives from Center City Housing Incentive Policy under the Center City Development and Operations Department, which has a cap of $2.75 per square foot on rental properties for its tax reimbursement grant.

While Weston Urban has not revealed unit sizes, a 500-square-foot unit, for example, could cost up to $1,375 under this restriction.

Jensen said the retail space will be targeted at activating the intersection of Pecan, Travis, Soledad and North Main streets with one or two restaurant users and some service-oriented tenants.

The tower received approval from the Historic and Design Review Commission late last year.

Wow. That rental rate would be roughly equivalent to spending $495,000 on that unit (if you mortgaged that rate over 30 years).
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  #134  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2021, 4:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ILUVSAT View Post
Wow. That rental rate would be roughly equivalent to spending $495,000 on that unit (if you mortgaged that rate over 30 years).
How do you figure? I would love to buy something for $495,000 and only pay $1375/mo.

I suppose you’re excluding taxes and insurance, because taxes and insurance alone are almost $1375/mo on a $495,000 place.
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  #135  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2021, 8:54 PM
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There is an update on this AWESOME, STUNNING project on saheron.com.
Article came out today!
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  #136  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2021, 9:07 PM
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Nice find AwesomeSAView. Here is the article.


Development Profile: Weston Urban’s 32-story apartment tower awarded final piece of $7.5M San Antonio subsidy

MARCH 3, 2021 BY HERON STAFF

Weston Urban expects to begin work on its $107 million, 32-story high-end apartment building in the middle of this year, and for it to be completed in two years, Mark Jensen and Reeves Craig, the developer’s vice presidents, told the Houston Street Tax Increment Reinvestment Zone (TIRZ) last Thursday.

All of the tower’s 351 apartments, ranging from 535-square-feet for an efficiency to beyond 2,000-square-feet for a penthouse, are expected to be priced at market-rate. The average unit size will be 925 square feet.

Jensen and Craig did not disclose rents, but said each unit would cost $362,963 to build, when factoring in the cost of construction along with related costs, such as the land purchase and financing.

Weston Urban has received $7.5 million in city incentives, including a 75% rebate on city property taxes over 15 years, worth an estimated $6.5 million, executed in December. The other 25% of taxes due over the same period, or $2.2 million, will feed the city’s affordable housing fund.

Last week, the Houston Street TIRZ agreed to grant up to $1 million to cover the cost of SAWS impact fees.

In a TIRZ, the increment in tax revenue gained is collected and reinvested in the boundary.


The Bexar Appraisal District valued the property last year at $3.1 million.

During the meeting, Jensen and Craig revealed more details about one of the most anticipated residential projects in the downtown area ever.

The exterior will be made of dark and light masonry, as well as concrete and glass. Apartments will consume floors 7 through 32. An amenity deck and pool will occupy the seventh floor.

The 7,200-square-feet of retail space is intended to activate the corners of the building, especially on the northeast corner of North Main Avenue and East Travis Street, kitty corner to the park Weston Urban just built. Jensen told board members there would be a natural pedestrian connection between a large-scale restaurant facing Travis and and Pinkerton’s Barbecue, which opened recently at the park.

The spaces facing Soledad Street and North Main Avenue he described as more “service-oriented.”

Weston Urban is planning for the building’s main entrance and lobby to face Main Avenue, and to place vehicular traffic access on Soledad, across from the Weston Centre, where there’s already a garage opening there.

“From a residential standpoint, we’re very excited to bring something to the city that sits in between the river and the creek,” Jensen said of the San Antonio River and San Pedro Creek. “The ability to pop out and go for a run along either of those greenways should be a very special experience.”

Jensen said Weston Urban currently has about 20,000 square feet of retail space it’s currently trying to lease, which includes in the Frost Tower, which opened almost two years ago, as well as in the neighboring Rand and Savoy buildings on East Houston Street.

During the meeting Jensen identified roughly $1.7 million worth of public upgrades, such as work that needs to be done to the streets, electrical and gas work, and telecommunications connections—the types of work TIRZ’s were created for—but Thursday’s vote only covered SAWS impact fees, city officials said.

It’s unclear whether Weston Urban will return to the city for a subsidy to fund the gap.

Jensen said Weston Urban will look to build mixed-income housing in future projects, where the average apartment size would be in the 700-square-foot range.

“This one particularly is targeting the higher end of the market,” he said.

— Ben Olivo, Heron editor
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