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  #1  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2007, 5:54 AM
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Top states for culinary travel

Study: California top spot for culinary travel
POSTED: 2:18 p.m. EST, February 23, 2007

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NEW YORK (AP) -- California is the top destination for travelers whose vacation plans include food festivals, wine tours and other culinary pursuits, according to a new study from the Travel Industry Association.

California was cited as a destination for food-related travel by 14 percent of those surveyed, followed by Florida (10 percent), New York (7 percent), Texas (6 percent), North Carolina (4 percent), Georgia (4 percent), Louisiana (3 percent), Illinois (3 percent), Nevada (3 percent), Pennsylvania (3 percent), Washington (3 percent), Hawaii (3 percent), Michigan (2 percent), Arizona (2 percent), and Virginia (2 percent).

California was also the No. 1 choice for wine-related travel, cited by 31 percent of those surveyed. Following California on the wine travel list were New York, cited by 10 percent of those surveyed, Missouri (5 percent), North Carolina (5 percent), Oregon (5 percent), Pennsylvania (5 percent), Washington (4 percent), Virginia (4 percent), Texas (4 percent), and Florida, Michigan and Ohio, each cited by 2 percent.

The study, released February 14, found that 27 million travelers, or 17 percent of U.S. leisure travelers, engaged in "culinary or wine-related activities" while traveling during the past three years.

Culinary activities included cooking classes, dining out for a unique and memorable experience, visiting farmers markets, gourmet food shopping and attending food festivals. Wine activities included touring a winery, driving a wine trail, tasting locally made wines and attending wine festivals.

Mandala added that culinary travelers are also "more likely to take local foods and wines back home with them" than other travelers.

The study was done in partnership with Gourmet magazine and the International Culinary Tourism Association.

The study also found that 60 percent of U.S. leisure travelers say they're interested in culinary travel as a potential vacation activity for the future.

The survey was conducted online by Edge Research among a representative sample of 2,364 U.S. leisure traveler respondents.
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  #2  
Old Posted Mar 11, 2007, 2:21 AM
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North Carolina is known as a culinary and wine destination? I know they're famous for their BBQ... but I find it suprising.
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  #3  
Old Posted Mar 12, 2007, 10:22 PM
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I don't know about this list. I'm sorry, but culinary travels in Missouri, Michigan and Pennsylvania? C'mon.
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  #4  
Old Posted Mar 13, 2007, 6:05 AM
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Originally Posted by PDX City-State View Post
I don't know about this list. I'm sorry, but culinary travels in Missouri, Michigan and Pennsylvania? C'mon.

I probalby sound like a dick after questioning North Carolina's inclusion.

Philadelphia has one of the finest dining scenes in the country... Pennsylvania is also popular for its regional/ethnic cuisine... this is one of the most "ethnic" states in the country with a rich history of homestyle culinary tradition... from Amish to Eastern European... Pennsylvania is also a top wine state due to our Lake Erie orchards. PA is certainly a top foodie destination.
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Old Posted Mar 13, 2007, 7:06 AM
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I agree with you on Philly--it has all the elements of a great food city--from foie gras to cheese steaks and everything in between. Pittsburgh is good in a different sort of way.

I'll leave Pennsylvania alone, but I still take issue with this list. Arizona? Great Mexican food granted, but I was in Tucson a couple of weeks ago and was shocked at the lack of variety. There's one Thai restaurant in Tucson. Phoenix isn't much better. Georgia ahead of Louisiana? What typifies Georgia cuisine?

What frustrates me more is the wine destinations. North Carolina is ahead of Washington, which produces some of the best reds outside of Europe. Missourri tied with Oregon? Oregon has some of best pinots in the world. When was the last time you saw a Missourri wine at a NYC restaurant?
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  #6  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2007, 12:42 AM
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Florida is second? Should be first!
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  #7  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2007, 4:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Evergrey View Post
North Carolina is known as a culinary and wine destination? I know they're famous for their BBQ... but I find it suprising.
The state of North Carolina only recently began to promote and market the industry, although the Biltmore Estate Wine Company in Asheville was already the most visited winery in the United States with one million visitors annually. The Yadkin Valley, North Carolina’s first federally designated American Viticultural Area (AVA), is bordered to the west by the Blue Ridge Mountains. Yadkin Valley Wine Country contains 18 wineries, the highest concentration of wineries in the state. http://www.yadkinvalleywineries.com/

Winston-Salem, on the eastern border of the Yadkin Valley, hosts the North Carolina Wine Festival each year in June. http://www.ncwinefestival.com/

North Carolina ranks 10th in the U.S. for wine production and for grape production. There are 61 wineries in 34 counties, with ten new wineries expected to open by December 2007. There are more than 350 individually owned grape vineyards across the state covering 1,350 acres. Some N.C. winery photos from flickr:

Raffaldini Winery



Shelton Vineyards




Childress Winery



Biltmore Estate Winery
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  #8  
Old Posted Nov 7, 2007, 8:29 AM
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Originally Posted by PDX City-State View Post
I agree with you on Philly--it has all the elements of a great food city--from foie gras to cheese steaks and everything in between. Pittsburgh is good in a different sort of way.

I'll leave Pennsylvania alone, but I still take issue with this list. Arizona? Great Mexican food granted, but I was in Tucson a couple of weeks ago and was shocked at the lack of variety. There's one Thai restaurant in Tucson. Phoenix isn't much better. Georgia ahead of Louisiana? What typifies Georgia cuisine?

What frustrates me more is the wine destinations. North Carolina is ahead of Washington, which produces some of the best reds outside of Europe. Missourri tied with Oregon? Oregon has some of best pinots in the world. When was the last time you saw a Missourri wine at a NYC restaurant?
I'm not sure what "typifies" Georgia cuisine, but Paula Deene has helped elevate Georgia somewhat. A lot of traditional southern food originated in Native American culture, like dishes using corn (grits and cornbread), squash, pumpkins, beans, tomatoes, etc. Some of the state's unique or famous cuisine:

Fried Green Tomotoes
Barbecue
Soul Food
Fried Chicken
Vidalia Onions
Peaches
Peanuts
Pecans
Coastal/Low Country (Savannah)

There are several well-known and award winning restaurants in Atlanta and Savannah. North Georgia also has a wine region with 11 wineries.

Last edited by sprtsluvr8; Nov 8, 2007 at 12:08 AM.
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  #9  
Old Posted Nov 10, 2007, 5:17 PM
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Also, Atlanta is a pretty hip dining scene on it's own. Friends from out of town (including NY & LA folk) are routinely blown away by the restaurant scene here.
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  #10  
Old Posted Nov 12, 2007, 11:36 PM
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Originally Posted by atlantaguy View Post
Also, Atlanta is a pretty hip dining scene on it's own. Friends from out of town (including NY & LA folk) are routinely blown away by the restaurant scene here.
I agree...although I was trying to avoid touting Atlanta because of the ire it is known to attract.
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  #11  
Old Posted Nov 13, 2007, 5:12 PM
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I know...I hesitated, but nobody must look at this thread, LOL!

I predict it will be locked within a week!
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  #12  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2008, 1:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX City-State View Post
I agree with you on Philly--it has all the elements of a great food city--from foie gras to cheese steaks and everything in between. Pittsburgh is good in a different sort of way.

I'll leave Pennsylvania alone, but I still take issue with this list. Arizona? Great Mexican food granted, but I was in Tucson a couple of weeks ago and was shocked at the lack of variety. There's one Thai restaurant in Tucson. Phoenix isn't much better. Georgia ahead of Louisiana? What typifies Georgia cuisine?

What frustrates me more is the wine destinations. North Carolina is ahead of Washington, which produces some of the best reds outside of Europe. Missourri tied with Oregon? Oregon has some of best pinots in the world. When was the last time you saw a Missourri wine at a NYC restaurant?
One Thai restaurant in Tucson??? You're kidding, right? Perhaps you were just overgeneralizing - Trust me - there's more than one Thai restaurant in Tucson, and yes, there's also more variety than just Mexican food (and the one Thai restaurant).
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  #13  
Old Posted Feb 10, 2008, 5:43 AM
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Everywhere has good food. Another I'm better BS list.
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  #14  
Old Posted Mar 17, 2008, 8:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX City-State View Post
I'll leave Pennsylvania alone, but I still take issue with this list. Arizona? Great Mexican food granted, but I was in Tucson a couple of weeks ago and was shocked at the lack of variety. There's one Thai restaurant in Tucson. Phoenix isn't much better.
I disagree. Look at the number of James Beard Southwest award-winners in the Phoenix area: nine. More than Nevada (!!!!) and Texas. I think that fact points out that there is a substantial amount of dining quality and variety in Arizona, although it may be hard to find.

I would recommend (certainly for Phoenix, I'm not so sure about Tucson) that you check out the Chowhound.com forums before you are in the area again. I've found those forums to provide some incredibly helpful recommendations for my home city of Phoenix, and I look forward to soliciting their input the next time I have opportunity to travel to other cities.
In the Internet era, there really is no excuse to eat lower quality when you'd prefer (and have opportunity) to eat higher quality. I think that's probably true of all of the states on this list, regardless of what impressions I may have of the dining scene in, say, Texas.
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