HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #21  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 12:09 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 15,686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil McAvity View Post
The CSA for SLC is double that of the MSA which is why I always ignore CSA numbers and go with MSA numbers since CSA's seem to take in large areas all around the metro area so to me SLC has a population of ~1.2 million people. If you think I'm wrong just look at SLC's skyline and compare it to other MSAs of 2.5 million people and it's not even close. In fact, even for a city of 1.2 million SLC doesn't have a great skyline
This kind of reminds me of those who travel L.A. freeways to visit Disneyland, Hollywood Blvd. and So. Cal beaches, then they return home. Many tourists go on to assume they know everything there is to know about the intimate details of MSA/CSA Los Angeles. No offense to anyone intended, but obviously the comment indicates that factual knowledge about the MSA/CSA of the Wasatch Front needs a little updating. Of course, I totally understand that you should not be expected to have an intimate acquaintance with the SLC CSA. For example, do you understand that I could very easily be a part of the Central MSA of Salt Lake, yet my neighbor across the street is a part of the Southern MSA of Provo-Orem. The same applies for the Northern Ogden/Layton/Clearfield MSA and its connectivity to Salt Lake City. In fact, North Salt Lake, which is just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City is actually a part of the Northern MSA, not the Central MSA. If I lived in North Salt Lake I could easily commute to downtown via bicycle. My former home on the east bench of Salt Lake City, along with tens of thousands of other east bench residents was only 15 minutes from Park City, and even closer to the many mountain villages which surround it, all a part of the micropolitan communities of Heber. Anyway, the point is not to criticize, but just a little refresher update from those who actually live there.

Regarding skylines. In many ways Greater Salt Lake City's CSA is a lot like the Greater Los Angeles CSA when comparing CSA size to skylines. For example, one would think that a city like L.A. with a CSA that is much larger than Chicago would also have a skyline much more impressive, more along the line of New York City. Of course, that hasn't been the case. However, now Los Angeles is finally pushing a downtown buildup that will be far more indicative of it's greater CSA influence. The same applies to Salt Lake City and it's greater CSA. Salt Lake City's downtown is just now beginning to catch up with the burgeoning boomtown atmosphere of its CSA.

Salt Lake's downtown is the cultural, social and business hub of one of the most rapidly developing CSA's in the country. If Downtown's next decade mimics the last two decades, by 2030 it will be not only one of the most vibrant street scenes, but given its backdrop, it will also have one of the most attractive skylines.

Last edited by delts145; Apr 3, 2020 at 3:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #22  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2020, 1:20 PM
delts145's Avatar
delts145 delts145 is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Downtown Los Angeles
Posts: 15,686
Just a couple more brief comments on the Wasatch Front CSA. First, I'm not sure how many national/international forum members actually frequent these local forums. For many City/MSA/CSA forumers the preferred daily conversation on developments occurs over on the SkyscaperPage Forum under the heading of the Compilation Thread. If your not acquainted with the development going on in the greater Salt Lake City CSA, and you would like a quick speed course then go to the Compilation Thread under Salt Lake City and surf the last 10 or 20 pages. That will give you a quicker feel for the actual hyper-growth and connectivity of the CSA.

Another quick note: It would be understandable to question the actual compactness of some of these CSA numbers that are often thrown out. For example, there are a few CSA's which I'm quite on the ground familiar with. I have to laugh when they are wrapping a CSA together that not only is not connected via mass-transit, but has vast stretches of uninhabited miles of flat land territory with no topographical barriers between communities. Out of sheer necessity, Salt Lake's CSA is compelled to compactness and ever-increasing density. From north to south and even its eastern flanks linked by canyons are surrounded by large mountain walls and lake shoreline.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #23  
Old Posted Today, 6:46 AM
Stenar's Avatar
Stenar Stenar is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Salt Lake City
Posts: 3,093
That's a good thing to point to L.A., which has a much smaller skyline than it's MSA/CSA would otherwise indicate. Los Angeles and SLC are very similar in development patterns.

The local culture in SLC is very frugal, and skyscraper rents have always come at a premium, which is a large part of the lack of demand for skyscrapers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by delts145 View Post
This kind of reminds me of those who travel L.A. freeways to visit Disneyland, Hollywood Blvd. and So. Cal beaches, then they return home. Many tourists go on to assume they know everything there is to know about the intimate details of MSA/CSA Los Angeles. No offense to anyone intended, but obviously the comment indicates that factual knowledge about the MSA/CSA of the Wasatch Front needs a little updating. Of course, I totally understand that you should not be expected to have an intimate acquaintance with the SLC CSA. For example, do you understand that I could very easily be a part of the Central MSA of Salt Lake, yet my neighbor across the street is a part of the Southern MSA of Provo-Orem. The same applies for the Northern Ogden/Layton/Clearfield MSA and its connectivity to Salt Lake City. In fact, North Salt Lake, which is just minutes from downtown Salt Lake City is actually a part of the Northern MSA, not the Central MSA. If I lived in North Salt Lake I could easily commute to downtown via bicycle. My former home on the east bench of Salt Lake City, along with tens of thousands of other east bench residents was only 15 minutes from Park City, and even closer to the many mountain villages which surround it, all a part of the micropolitan communities of Heber. Anyway, the point is not to criticize, but just a little refresher update from those who actually live there.

Regarding skylines. In many ways Greater Salt Lake City's CSA is a lot like the Greater Los Angeles CSA when comparing CSA size to skylines. For example, one would think that a city like L.A. with a CSA that is much larger than Chicago would also have a skyline much more impressive, more along the line of New York City. Of course, that hasn't been the case. However, now Los Angeles is finally pushing a downtown buildup that will be far more indicative of it's greater CSA influence. The same applies to Salt Lake City and it's greater CSA. Salt Lake City's downtown is just now beginning to catch up with the burgeoning boomtown atmosphere of its CSA.

Salt Lake's downtown is the cultural, social and business hub of one of the most rapidly developing CSA's in the country. If Downtown's next decade mimics the last two decades, by 2030 it will be not only one of the most vibrant street scenes, but given its backdrop, it will also have one of the most attractive skylines.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Mountain West
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:06 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.