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  #61  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 5:39 PM
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Originally Posted by jtown,man View Post
Yeah, but in the long term won't there still be demand for all those businesses that people go to cities for? People will simply open more restaurants and bars. Hell, have you guys seen the failure rate in that industry in a normal year? It's a wonder anyone ever opens one up in the first place.
We’re American cities always full of fantastic restaurants, cool bars, pop-up galleries, food trucks, independent boutiques, etc? At least during the 20th century?

Virtuous cycles can turn into vicious cycles. People have moved to cities for these things, and the influx of people with money has led to more of these things being created. But it could go the other way, too. Lots of bankruptcies and closed businesses, people move away, less demand exists etc.

I think it depends on how long the recovery takes.
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  #62  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 5:43 PM
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Originally Posted by iheartthed View Post
Wasn't NYC technically more attractive in that movie? lol. He could've lived anywhere but stayed there...
Yeah but he had prime real estate right near Washington Square. I mean no rent, no taxes. Truly affordable housing.

Yeah he had a night time curfew and all that bs, but no traffic, no taxes, he didn't have to pay $1000 sq/ft.

Will Smith had it good.

And he could drive his car too, without dealing with double parked trucks or risk of getting an orange envelope for parking near a fire hydrant.
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  #63  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 5:57 PM
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Originally Posted by chris08876 View Post
Yeah but he had prime real estate right near Washington Square. I mean no rent, no taxes. Truly affordable housing.

Yeah he had a night time curfew and all that bs, but no traffic, no taxes, he didn't have to pay $1000 sq/ft.

Will Smith had it good.

And he could drive his car too, without dealing with double parked trucks or risk of getting an orange envelope for parking near a fire hydrant.
At the same time, NYC was absolutely infested with those vampire things where as he could have fled to a farm upstate with his dog...who could have still been alive had he stayed the F away from Grand Central.
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  #64  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2020, 7:42 PM
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I don't think in actuality density makes much of a difference.

Destinations in the suburbs are pretty much the same on the inside as the urban ones once you get on the inside, where people actually are. A grocery store is a grocery store. A restaurant is a restaurant.

Getting to those places is mixed. Yeah, in the suburbs you can drive and keep a safe distance, but during quarantine in urban areas there shouldn't be so many people walking around that it's a serious risk. Transit is different but most truly urban neighborhoods will have the basic amenities within walking distance.

I think if there ends up being an actual correlation with density, I don't think it would be a direct correlation, but an indirect one. Big cities are cosmopolitan places with a lot of business travel and tourism. 11% of Americans have never left their home state, and 40% have never left the country. Those numbers are going to be a lot different in place like NYC.


As far as the general future of cities, I doubt it will have much of an impact on people's perceptions. 9/11 made people a lot more aware of the types of places that were good terrorist targets, and pro-urban trends have only gotten stronger since then. The same could be said for all the recent smaller terrorist attacks.

For how it will affect the economy in urban areas, we'll have to wait and see. I don't think we know how much of it is just because things are temporarily shut down, how much of it has a substantial underlying basis, and what kind of ripple effect the temporary stuff will have. Although I would guess that urban areas would be better off than suburban areas, because urban areas often have intrinsic qualities that make them well suited for certain businesses while suburbs are often times just generic square footage.

I think the same goes for telecommuting. The businesses renting the more expensive office space found in downtowns are doing it because for whatever reasons that physical presence is valuable to them, while the businesses locating in random suburban office parks don't care about that and are looking to find the cheapest possible place to dump a cube farm. So I think there's already some self selection going on there.
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  #65  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 8:00 AM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
At the same time, NYC was absolutely infested with those vampire things where as he could have fled to a farm upstate with his dog...who could have still been alive had he stayed the F away from Grand Central.
Vampire things? Zombies.

Vampires aren’t even scary... you can repel them with garlic and I eat enough of that normally to be vampire-proof.
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There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
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  #66  
Old Posted Mar 27, 2020, 8:54 AM
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A lot of people are probably considering a move to a ranch in Wyoming or Montana, or some remote hamlet in Alaska or New Zealand. How many actually do it depends on the containment of this virus and others, and how people respond. Will crime rise? So far not, which is good. New York reached its nadir with the crime and grime of the 1970s. I am an optimist. I think we will get past this, with an effective drug treatment and vaccine. We will learn from this and be more prepared. The economy will bounce back once people can go back to work. There is no reason for this to be the 1930s, as long as the government money spigots stay open. A massive infrastructure spending spree will probably put a lot of people to work in the next year or two.

Last edited by CaliNative; Mar 27, 2020 at 9:05 AM.
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