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  #4321  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2019, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
45 for Toronto proper is promising after the crazy spike last year.

Seem like every other day I'm hearing about a murder in Brampton now though.
Husband kills ex wife with machete is crazy and likely a spike in machete caused murders
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  #4322  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 2:01 AM
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Originally Posted by le calmar View Post
I just realized how big Brampton is in a different thread. I would never have guessed it was 600,000 as it kinda slips under the radar compared to other GTA cities like Mississauga. I always thought it was in the 200-300k range.
I think it's more surprising that Vaughan and Markham both have like 350,000
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  #4323  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 2:07 AM
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46 for Toronto now and 19 for Peel Region
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  #4324  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 5:37 AM
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7 in London so far this year and 4 in Windsor.
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  #4325  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 6:08 AM
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Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
It's grown extremely fast, doubling in population in the last 20 years. I get the feeling the crime is partially a spillover from proximity to Toronto's historically most dangerous neighbourhoods in Rexdale, Jane and Finch, etc. but I wonder how much is "homegrown" in the sense of the children of the first-generation immigrants falling down the wrong path.
Great, so having avoided the worst of the American experience we’ve now imported our own criminal underclass?
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  #4326  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 11:40 AM
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Relax there, we're talking about 19 murders in a region of 1.3 million people. Mississauga/Brampton would still be one of the safest cities in North America if it were an independent metro.
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  #4327  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 2:40 PM
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Originally Posted by suburbanite View Post
Relax there, we're talking about 19 murders in a region of 1.3 million people. Mississauga/Brampton would still be one of the safest cities in North America if it were an independent metro.
Winnipeg would be one of the safest cities in North America if we were to compare with American cites/metro areas.
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  #4328  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 3:30 PM
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Found this on line

https://www.numbeo.com/crime/region_...mid&region=021

Interestingly Surrey is the most crime ridden city in Canada. Winnipeg is behind Regina.
Quebec City is considered the safest city in NA.

At least based on this reporting system.
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  #4329  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 4:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Airboy View Post
Found this on line

https://www.numbeo.com/crime/region_...mid&region=021

Interestingly Surrey is the most crime ridden city in Canada. Winnipeg is behind Regina.
Quebec City is considered the safest city in NA.

At least based on this reporting system.
Huh, I wouldn't have expected Calgary to be the least crime ridden city on the Prairies, but it's a welcomed ranking. Second in all of Western Canada next to Victoria
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  #4330  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 6:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airboy View Post
Found this on line

https://www.numbeo.com/crime/region_...mid&region=021
Interestingly Surrey is the most crime ridden city in Canada. Winnipeg is behind Regina.
Quebec City is considered the safest city in NA.

At least based on this reporting system.
Totally anecdotal - and I’d like to see the stats on this - but Quebec City must have the lowest levels of wealth inequality of any major city in North America. Driving around, no part of the city feels truly “rich” or very viscerally “poor”. The Area south of the Grande Allee along the cliffs looks affluent, but more like upper middle class, not like Bridle Path or West Point Grey or even like Westmount. There are also few markers of wealth, like designer stores or luxury cars roaming around.
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  #4331  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 6:56 PM
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Originally Posted by hipster duck View Post
Totally anecdotal - and I’d like to see the stats on this - but Quebec City must have the lowest levels of wealth inequality of any major city in North America. Driving around, no part of the city feels truly “rich” or very viscerally “poor”. The Area south of the Grande Allee along the cliffs looks affluent, but more like upper middle class, not like Bridle Path or West Point Grey or even like Westmount. There are also few markers of wealth, like designer stores or luxury cars roaming around.
That's worth bragging about, and something for them to hold on to.

The Winnipeg of my childhood felt that way (although I concede that inequality was always present)... there were some rough and tumble working class neighbourhoods and some wealthier areas, but it didn't go too much from one extreme to another. Even places like the North End or Centennial were still pretty livable areas.

These days, some of those working class neighbourhoods are now characterized by poverty and extreme social dysfunction. The wealthier areas like Old Tuxedo have seen many of their sober 50s bungalows demolished and replaced with splashy mansions, complete with ostentatious luxury cars in the driveway.
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  #4332  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 6:58 PM
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Originally Posted by GregSF View Post
Winnipeg would be one of the safest cities in North America if we were to compare with American cites/metro areas.
Uh, no Winnipeg's homicide rate is the highest in Canada and higher than a lot of US cities!

Winnipeg holds the dubious honour of being the violent crime capital of Canada, with a rate of 153.5 violent crimes per 100,000 people
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  #4333  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:08 PM
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Yeah, I’m old enough to remember when owning a small Mercedes, or even a new Volvo was a big deal in the city I grew up in. Demolishing your tiny bungalow and building a flashy monster home (nowadays a modern box home) was a completely alien concept outside of Vancouver and a handful of Toronto neighbourhoods.

Quebec is always more socially equal compared to the rest of the country, all else being equal, but Montreal feels much more conspicuously unequal and approaching the Anglo Canadian baseline every time I visit, whereas Quebec City still feels like a time warp.
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  #4334  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:09 PM
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Originally Posted by rrskylar View Post
Uh, no Winnipeg's homicide rate is the highest in Canada and higher than a lot of US cities!
Where to even begin with this...

Winnipeg had a homicide rate of 2.69 last year, which ranks us in 12th last place compared to the 100 largest US cities with reported data.

For context, Edmonton at 2.60 would rank the same as Winnipeg compared to the top 100 US cities, Calgary at 1.33 would rank 5th last place.

Thunder Bay had the highest homicide rate among Canadian cities last year with 6.38. Brantford was in second place at 3.36.
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  #4335  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:35 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
Where to even begin with this...

Winnipeg had a homicide rate of 2.69 last year, which ranks us in 12th last place compared to the 100 largest US cities with reported data.

For context, Edmonton at 2.60 would rank the same as Winnipeg compared to the top 100 US cities, Calgary at 1.33 would rank 5th last place.

Thunder Bay had the highest homicide rate among Canadian cities last year with 6.38. Brantford was in second place at 3.36.
Sure the homicide rate fluctuates with with the usual cities in Canada always near the top.

Violent crime has Winnipeg nearly always at the top.
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  #4336  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:37 PM
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Originally Posted by whatnext View Post
Great, so having avoided the worst of the American experience we’ve now imported our own criminal underclass?
Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not.

In any event, without taking all of the responsibility off the shoulders of the criminals themselves, on a societal level it's hard not to see some kind of failing in the integration of certain groups of young males.

We have taken in people from all over the world who came from places where they or their families were exposed to the worst humanity has to offer in terms of crime, oppression and warfare, and made almost all of them into productive, valued Canadians.

It's not in the spirit of the times I realize, as focusing on such things makes many people uncomfortable, but I think people should ask themselves why things aren't working out so well with certain groups?
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  #4337  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:39 PM
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Originally Posted by rrskylar View Post
Sure the homicide rate fluctuates with with the usual cities in Canada always near the top.

Violent crime has Winnipeg nearly always at the top.
Sure, but you make it sound like Winnipeg is running neck and neck with Baltimore and Detroit when in reality we rank closer to Scottsdale, Boise and San Diego, places near the bottom of the list which are hardly considered American hotbeds of crime.
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  #4338  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:40 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
That's worth bragging about, and something for them to hold on to.

The Winnipeg of my childhood felt that way (although I concede that inequality was always present)... there were some rough and tumble working class neighbourhoods and some wealthier areas, but it didn't go too much from one extreme to another. Even places like the North End or Centennial were still pretty livable areas.

These days, some of those working class neighbourhoods are now characterized by poverty and extreme social dysfunction. The wealthier areas like Old Tuxedo have seen many of their sober 50s bungalows demolished and replaced with splashy mansions, complete with ostentatious luxury cars in the driveway.
The old working class and ethnic neighbourhoods of Winnipeg changed when "working" was supplanted and the welfare state became the norm. In those neighbourhoods, work, education and respect all went out the window!
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  #4339  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Not sure if you are being sarcastic or not.

In any event, without taking all of the responsibility off the shoulders of the criminals themselves, on a societal level it's hard not to see some kind of failing in the integration of certain groups of young males.

We have taken in people from all over the world who came from places where they or their families were exposed to the worst humanity has to offer in terms of crime, oppression and warfare, and made almost all of them into productive, valued Canadians.

It's not in the spirit of the times I realize, as focusing on such things makes many people uncomfortable, but I think people should ask themselves why things aren't working out so well with certain groups?
If you want to look at it from a more positive view, you could ask why some places are more successful at minimizing the levels of violence in their society. What do they do that works?
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  #4340  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2019, 7:49 PM
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Originally Posted by rrskylar View Post
the old working class and ethnic neighbourhoods of winnipeg changed when "working" was supplanted and the welfare state became the norm. In those neighbourhoods, work, education and respect all went out the window! Sad!
ftfy
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