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  #21  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 3:16 PM
Inkoumori Inkoumori is offline
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^Surprised to see 18% of Asheville is African-American- would not have thought that in Appalachia.

Cool history HH
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  #22  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 4:42 PM
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Originally Posted by ivymike View Post
^Surprised to see 18% of Asheville is African-American- would not have thought that in Appalachia.

Cool history HH
Southern Appalachia, though, which feels less crunchy and more laid back southern elements than middle appalachia or even the ozarks.
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  #23  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 5:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Nineties Flava View Post
Thanks for the detailed account on the situation in Asheville. What happened there with functional black neighborhoods being displaced with dysfunctional projects is what happened in San Francisco's Western Addition. Once the most thriving black business and residential district on the West Coast - sometimes referred to as the "Harlem of the West" - it became the most dangerous neighborhood in the downtown periphery and remained so for the brunt of the 80's and 90's when the iconic SF Victorians were bulldozed and replaced by high-rise and low-rise projects.
Your timeline is off. The Western Addition Victorians were bulldozed in the 1950s and 1960s; by the 1990s the city was dismantling the post-war housing projects and rebuilding them as townhomes.
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  #24  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 6:51 PM
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Originally Posted by fflint View Post
Your timeline is off. The Western Addition Victorians were bulldozed in the 1950s and 1960s; by the 1990s the city was dismantling the post-war housing projects and rebuilding them as townhomes.

That wasn't what I said. I said the neighborhood became particularly dangerous in the 80's and 90's, not that the redevelopment occurred then.
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  #25  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 7:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Segun View Post
Are there any successes in Chicago Public Housing?
Socially? Not really. Architecturally, there are numerous projects that are successful. Lathrop, Dearborn, etc.

There are also a handful of quasi-public housing developments from before WWII that were relatively successful, including the Marshall Field Garden Apartments and the Rosenwald Apartments.

Lathrop and Altgeld are both being replanned.
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  #26  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 8:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Socially? Not really. Architecturally, there are numerous projects that are successful. Lathrop, Dearborn, etc.

There are also a handful of quasi-public housing developments from before WWII that were relatively successful, including the Marshall Field Garden Apartments and the Rosenwald Apartments.

Lathrop and Altgeld are both being replanned.
Maybe Hilliard Homes, it's a senior public housing complex.

http://bertrandgoldberg.org/projects...hillard-homes/
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  #27  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 8:35 PM
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Originally Posted by fflint View Post
Your timeline is off. The Western Addition Victorians were bulldozed in the 1950s and 1960s; by the 1990s the city was dismantling the post-war housing projects and rebuilding them as townhomes.
They didn't rebuild all of the old projects in the Fillmore in the 90s though, they focused mostly on the most crime-ridden ones.

Speaking of the projects in the Fillmore, here's an old NY Times article from 1981, about lost tourists constantly getting robbed/assaulted near what was once one of SF's worst projects, Yerba Buena Plaza Annex, or "the pink palace" (it was painted pink), which was overrun by drug dealers. It was converted to senior housing in 1982, and later torn down:

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/30/us...s-project.html

some pics of the Pink Palace:


http://foundsf.org/index.php?title=P...es_Full_Circle


http://www.flickr.com/photos/davegla...n/photostream/


And here's another NY times article from 1996, about the poor state the SFHA was in, and which mentions another highrise project in the Fillmore, Yerba Buena Plaza East. It was nicknamed "OC" or "Outta Control", and was another tower that got completely overrun with drug dealers (it was demolished in 1998, and replaced with lowrise projects):

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/24/us...anted=2&src=pm

Here are a couple pictures of the OC projects before they got torn down:





Here's another notoriously dangerous/run-down highrise project that got demolished and replaced with lowrise townhomes in the late 90s. The Bernal Dwellings, aka "Army Street":



The Bernal Dwellings are the only bad highrise projects in SF that I have personal memories of as a kid, just from passing by...and they definitely looked like a place you didn't want to be caught dead in: ugly, towering concrete buildings with giant "RIP XXXXX" tags all over the place, garbage piled up, shady dudes hanging out, etc. Your typical highly-screwed highrise project. A friend used to teach at a nearby school in the 90s, and they used to have shooting drills, because bullets coming from the direction of the projects would occasionally hit the school. They were rebuilt as townhomes, and though crime went down quite a bit, the projects and the area surrounding them remains one of the most crime-ridden parts of the Mission district and SF to this day.

But the most notorious highrise projects in SF might have been the Geneva Towers in Visitacion Valley. The story there is the same as many of the other highrise projects in SF: the Geneva Towers eventually got so overrun with drug dealers/criminals/addicts/etc, that they were torn down in 1998 for being a blight on the neighborhood, and replaced with lowrises (which like most replacement lowrises in SF, retained a lot--but not all--of the previous crime levels). Here's an article about them:

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/G...ic-3276396.php

Quote:
In just 15 seconds, the troubled 30-year-history of Geneva Towers, two San Francisco highrises once racked by drugs, shootings and mismanagement, will end today in an explosive cloud of dust...

...Geneva Towers was built in 1967 as private housing. But when the buildings failed to attract middle-income renters the owners sought low-income Section 8 tenants whose rents were subsidized by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

For years, the owners pocketed $200,000 a month in federal rent subsidies while the towers fall apart.

By the time HUD took over in 1991, Geneva Towers was a den of dope-dealing and violence. The takeover marked the first time the agency ever foreclosed on a property because of unsafe living conditions.

Indeed, rival gangs used to battle for tower turf and for a time whole floors of the buildings were controlled by drug dealers.

"The post office would not deliver on site. Pizza parlors would not deliver. The phone company ripped out all the public phones because workers refused to service them," said former Mayor Art Agnos, HUD's acting assistant secretary for housing. "The Police Department wouldn't go into the building unless there were two or three cars for backup."

In the towers' heyday, more than 1,000 people lived in the 585 units in the scary-looking mountains of concrete that soared above the neighborhood. As a result of poor management and lax security, criminals operated freely, frightening all those who came near.

"It's been hell for many, many years," said June Jackson, a retired teacher who lives in the neighborhood. "We're very glad to say goodbye."

One year alone, police reported seven homicides on the towers' grounds -- three in the buildings.

It was so bad that even police, often summoned to the place, approached with care, bracing for a dangerous onslaught of missiles from upper balconies -- rocks, televisions and once even a bowling ball.

But nothing compared to the chilling reception Deputy Chief Richard Holder got while still a patrolman in the 1970s.

"One of my first calls to that address, as we pulled up in front of the building I recall stepping out of my car and taking a step back . . . and a body landed right next to my car," said Holder, now head of Field Operations.

"Patroling the towers was a nightmare," said Holder. "I was shot at several times. We were routinely sniped at."


Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/G...#ixzz2De8aDoUA
Sounds a lot like the stories you would hear coming out of other bad highrise projects in SF or around the nation, such as Cabrini Green.

And a picture of the Geneva Towers:


http://foundsf.org/index.php?title=R..._Geneva_Towers

In the present, the worst projects in SF are the lowrises that were built originally as temporary housing for Navy Shipyard workers in WWII. These include developments like West Point/Hunters View projects (recently demolished), Sunnydale, Double Rock, Potrero Hill, and the Harbor Road projects, all of which were rated by the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development as some of the worst projects in the nation, back in 2007.

Some google streetview links:

Hunters View/West Point, which was rated the absolute worst in SF in 2007, with issues like crime, broken windows and lights, broken appliances, lack of smoke detectors, backed up sewers, mold, bullet holes, burnt-out trash cans and playgrounds, broken walls/ceilings/stairs, vacant units, etc, etc. It's probably 100% gone by now, as they started demolition in 2010 or 2011:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=west+...94124&t=m&z=16

Sunnydale (maybe the worst single project in SF, after the demolition of west point):

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=sunny...297.4,,0,17.25

Potrero Hill (as you can see, the road isn't even paved in this area of the projects):

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=misso...235.67,,0,2.04


You can tell that a lot of SF's projects are/were messed up just by the nicknames they gained: Yerba Buena Plaza East became "Outta Control", the Hayes Valley projects became "death valley", the Alemany Projects became "the black hole", the Sunnydale Projects became "the swamp".

I'd say some of the biggest "success" stories when it comes to the SFHA are the rebuilt Valencia Gardens and North Beach projects, which are MUCH better than they used to be in terms of crime rate. The various seniors buildings around SF and the Ping Yuen projects in Chinatown might qualify too. They're relatively crime free compared to most of SF's projects, but even Ping Yuen experienced a time where violence was abnormally high, when the gangs in Chinatown were at their peak in the 70s.
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  #28  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 9:36 PM
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The Jacksonville story is similar to Asheville's. The worst would probably be Hansontown. A This was a dense black neighborhood taken out and replaced with Blodgett Homes.


Aerial of Hansontown


Hansontown replaced with Blodgett Homes in 1942.


By the cocaine filled 1980s, Blodgett becomes the worst place for violet crime on this side of Florida.


Blodgett is torn down in 1990 and replaced with state office buildings featuring acres of surface parking and 159 public housing units called Blodgett Villas.

Since then, we've had a few others (Durkeeville & Brentwood) replaced with HOPE IV funds. However, their site layouts leave a lot to be desired, considering their urban locations.
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  #29  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 9:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech12 View Post
...In the present, the worst projects in SF are the lowrises that were built originally as temporary housing for Navy Shipyard workers in WWII. These include developments like West Point/Hunters View projects (recently demolished), Sunnydale, Double Rock, Potrero Hill, and the Harbor Road projects, all of which were rated by the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development as some of the worst projects in the nation, back in 2007.

Some google streetview links:

Hunters View/West Point, which was rated the absolute worst in SF in 2007, with issues like crime, broken windows and lights, broken appliances, lack of smoke detectors, backed up sewers, mold, bullet holes, burnt-out trash cans and playgrounds, broken walls/ceilings/stairs, vacant units, etc, etc. It's probably 100% gone by now, as they started demolition in 2010 or 2011:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=west+...94124&t=m&z=16

Sunnydale (maybe the worst single project in SF, after the demolition of west point):

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=sunny...297.4,,0,17.25

Potrero Hill (as you can see, the road isn't even paved in this area of the projects):

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=misso...235.67,,0,2.04


You can tell that a lot of SF's projects are/were messed up just by the nicknames they gained: Yerba Buena Plaza East became "Outta Control", the Hayes Valley projects became "death valley", the Alemany Projects became "the black hole", the Sunnydale Projects became "the swamp".

I'd say some of the biggest "success" stories when it comes to the SFHA are the rebuilt Valencia Gardens and North Beach projects, which are MUCH better than they used to be in terms of crime rate. The various seniors buildings around SF and the Ping Yuen projects in Chinatown might qualify too. They're relatively crime free compared to most of SF's projects, but even Ping Yuen experienced a time where violence was abnormally high, when the gangs in Chinatown were at their peak in the 70s.
Great post, I'll do a similar post on Oakland in a little bit.

Here's some of my own pics of the low-rise projects you mentioned.

Sunnydale


Sunnydale by BayRaised, on Flickr

Potrero Hill


The Other Side by BayRaised, on Flickr


Potrero Annex by BayRaised, on Flickr

Alemany


Down in the Black Hole by BayRaised, on Flickr


Alemany by BayRaised, on Flickr

Harbor Road


Hunters Point by BayRaised, on Flickr


Also, here's two recent pics of the Bernal Dwellings/Army Street:


Army Street by BayRaised, on Flickr


3021 by BayRaised, on Flickr

EDIT: And West Point's still there... they've sealed off the Evans Ave entrance but I still saw some cars in the complex as recently as 2 months ago.
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  #30  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2012, 11:26 PM
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Great post, Tech12--many forumers may be surprised to realize SF had high-rise housing projects back in the day. I personally went down to Viz Valley to watch the demolition of Geneva Towers--biggest demo I have ever seen live!

My bad memories of SF housing projects include Army Street--I delivered food to destitute AIDS patients in the early 1990s there (among other awful places, like the neighborhood of camper vans lining Terry Francois Blvd in the day). I used to cross the street to avoid walking by the old Valencia Gardens, which truly looked and felt like a mid-rise prison, and I remember a smaller project on Haight Street where people would throw bottles and other objects at unsuspecting passers-by.

All have been rebuilt into much, much better housing with a lot less crime. I'd say all the rebuilt townhome projects are a success--because they blend in with the neighborhoods better, they don't engender the stigma the old projects did. I think that makes the residents more a part of the city and less like prisoners. Better design, better cityscape.
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  #31  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2012, 4:31 AM
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In Oakland there are 1300 units owned and managed by the Oakland Housing Authority spread around two dozen or so complexes. Most of Oakland's public housing is concentrated around 7th Street in West Oakland and to a lesser extent International Blvd in East Oakland; there's also a few smaller complexes around San Pablo in North Oakland.

The largest complexes in West Oakland are Cypress Village, Campbell Village, Peralta Villa and the Acorn Apartments. Similarly to Asheville's black neighborhoods, West Oakland was a long-term victim of eminent domain; hundreds of homes and businesses were bulldozed to make way for projects, a very large post office, the Cypress Freeway (which crumbled during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake) and eventually BART between the 1950's and 70's. Of the four complexes, Peralta Villa is one of the oldest (built in 1942); part of it was recently reconstructed at a cost of $52,000,000 and turned into Mandela Gateway (pictured below). The rebuilt section of the project is arguably the most "successful" complex in West Oakland which can be attributed to its mixed-use design. While businesses have been slow to fill-in Peralta Villa's commercial space, the project's location directly across from the West Oakland BART station has been key in keeping the ones that have moved in afloat.

Peralta Villa/Mandela Gateway:


Mandela Gateway by BayRaised, on Flickr

Acorn (often referred to locally as the 'Corns) is the largest and arguably most notorious housing project in Oakland; bounded by Adeline and Market between 7th and 10th, it features the only high-rise project towers in the East Bay along with low-rise apartments. It has the dubious distinction of being where Black Panther founder Huey P. Newton uttered his last words before being gunned down: "You can kill my body but you can never kill my soul. My soul will live on forever." And so it goes with Acorn; though it has been torn down and rebuilt multiple times - often for the purpose of sealing off "fire lanes" that dealers would use to escape from police - it never shook off its reputation as West Oakland's craziest complex. Even amidst all the project drama though, everyone I know from Acorn swears by the complex's tightly-knit community. While the Panthers were around, you literally didn't have to leave Acorn to buy groceries, clothes or even to bank; it was a city within a city. Even in its current incarnation, it isn't designed to blend into the West Oakland neighborhood periphery of Victorians; in fact, the entire neighborhood is named "Acorn" after the project. It is truly the only project in Oakland that can be said to be something of an entity all on its own similar to how Cabrini Green was in Chicago. A very large number of black Oaklanders all around the city have family in the complex or at least have roots in it.

Acorn:


Acorn Towers by BayRaised, on Flickr


Let Us Forgive by BayRaised, on Flickr


Now Leasing by BayRaised, on Flickr

Campbell Village is considered to be the most violent project in West Oakland right now. Constructed in 1940 and 1941 to the general disdain of the surrounding black community (it resulted in the loss of many homes and churches), it is the sole housing project in the Lower Bottoms, West Oakland's poorest neighborhood. IMO there frankly isn't much of anything good to say about the project so I'll refrain from writing an essay on its long list of negatives.

Campbell Village:


Campbell Village by BayRaised, on Flickr

Here's a photo of Cypress Village:


Cypress Village by BayRaised, on Flickr

I'll cover East Oakland in another post.
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Last edited by Nineties Flava; Nov 30, 2012 at 4:59 AM.
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  #32  
Old Posted Nov 30, 2012, 11:48 PM
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http://www.open.edu/openlearn/histor...n-west-estates
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There's a great summary of the successes and failures of 60s and 70s London social housing at this site including the huge Alton estate.

One big factor behind their success/failure was the ongoing management of the buildings, including proper reception/security services. Was this the experience elsewhere?
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  #33  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2012, 4:13 AM
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One big factor behind their success/failure was the ongoing management of the buildings, including proper reception/security services. Was this the experience elsewhere?
Management failure was one of the big reasons why so many of SF's projects became so dilapidated and dangerous, and it was the same in many housing authorities around the nation. Here are some quotes from a couple articles I posted in my previous post about the horrible management failure of the projects in SF:

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/24/us...ay.html?src=pm

Quote:
...The meltdown of the San Francisco Housing Authority -- it was taken over by the team from the Department of Housing and Urban Development in March -- is also emblematic of nearly a dozen such authorities whose mismanaged properties have helped blacken the tarnished image of public housing.

Under Henry G. Cisneros, the Secretary of Housing, HUD is demolishing the worst of its high-rise projects and taking over the worst authorities. But that horrible reputation will linger for a long time, and it helps fuel current calls for the dissolution of HUD altogether.

The San Francisco authority, which has 30,000 tenants and has been called by some critics the worst slumlord in the city, has been bad for as long as anyone can remember.

But in recent years the authority, which has a budget of about $38 million, has gone from bad to worse. It could not keep an executive director, running through about one a year for the last five years and sending several packing amid controversy and finger-pointing. One director, according to former commissioners, seemed mainly to want to watch television all day.

Backlogs of requests for repairs have swelled. Financial bottlenecks have narrowed as the authority's control has faltered, and Mr. Marchman said this week that it was effectively bankrupt.

Last year, The San Francisco Examiner reported that the authority was failing to spend more than $3.5 million allotted to eliminate drugs, as well as money for cleaning up lead paint.

A HUD memorandum last year said that the authority had "little or no capacity for property management" and that its staff of about 500 had been conditioned to believe that the blight in the projects was acceptable and that change was impossible.

The board of seven commissioners, which is supposed to work with the director and the Mayor, contributed to the anomie. It seemed to bicker endlessly, wrapped up in politicking and personal agendas...
San Francisco even has the distinction of being home to the first housing project in the nation to ever be foreclosed on by the US department of Housing and Development, due to unsafe living conditions (that were brought on in part by poor management):

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/G...#ixzz2DlnKWhqJ

Quote:
...For years, the owners pocketed $200,000 a month in federal rent subsidies while the towers fall apart.

By the time HUD took over in 1991, Geneva Towers was a den of dope-dealing and violence. The takeover marked the first time the agency ever foreclosed on a property because of unsafe living conditions.

Indeed, rival gangs used to battle for tower turf and for a time whole floors of the buildings were controlled by drug dealers.

"The post office would not deliver on site. Pizza parlors would not deliver. The phone company ripped out all the public phones because workers refused to service them," said former Mayor Art Agnos, HUD's acting assistant secretary for housing. "The Police Department wouldn't go into the building unless there were two or three cars for backup."

In the towers' heyday, more than 1,000 people lived in the 585 units in the scary-looking mountains of concrete that soared above the neighborhood. As a result of poor management and lax security, criminals operated freely, frightening all those who came near...
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  #34  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2012, 9:47 AM
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^^^ Wow - thanks - that really says it all - depressing reading, but something that really needs to be understood.
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  #35  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2012, 3:11 PM
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They didn't rebuild all of the old projects in the Fillmore in the 90s though, they focused mostly on the most crime-ridden ones.

Speaking of the projects in the Fillmore, here's an old NY Times article from 1981, about lost tourists constantly getting robbed/assaulted near what was once one of SF's worst projects, Yerba Buena Plaza Annex, or "the pink palace" (it was painted pink), which was overrun by drug dealers. It was converted to senior housing in 1982, and later torn down:

http://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/30/us...s-project.html

some pics of the Pink Palace:


http://foundsf.org/index.php?title=P...es_Full_Circle


http://www.flickr.com/photos/davegla...n/photostream/


And here's another NY times article from 1996, about the poor state the SFHA was in, and which mentions another highrise project in the Fillmore, Yerba Buena Plaza East. It was nicknamed "OC" or "Outta Control", and was another tower that got completely overrun with drug dealers (it was demolished in 1998, and replaced with lowrise projects):

http://www.nytimes.com/1996/05/24/us...anted=2&src=pm
That's crazy. Also, unfortunately for the wayward traveler, Interstate 80 drops you right into the middle of that.

I remember when I was young and we lived in the East Bay, sometimes I would go to work with my mom in the city and I will always remember how on edge she was every time she had to walk from the BART station to her office between the Powell Station and City Hall (this was in the early-mid 90's). I went by that area this past summer and it feels much safer than it did then. For years after that friends would go visit San Francisco and stay at Fisherman's Wharf and talk about how nice the city was and I remember thinking about how different my experience was given that I rarely traveled there as a tourist and most of my experience in the City was between Downtown, the Tenderloin, and the Panhandle.
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  #36  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2012, 4:17 PM
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^Surprised to see 18% of Asheville is African-American- would not have thought that in Appalachia.
Also, Chattanooga has a 35% Black population, Roanoke, VA is 27% Black, Knoxville is 17% Black, and Charleston, WV is 15% Black.
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  #37  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2012, 7:02 PM
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East Oakland has 8 main non-senior public housing complexes: Tassafaronga Village, Lockwood Gardens/Lion Creek Crossing Apartments, Marin Way Court, Jingletown Homes, Foothill Family Apartments, Kenneth Henry Court, Oak Park Apartments and Fruitvale Villas. All of them have been remodeled or rebuilt in the last 15 years.

Tassafaronga Village is in the Woodland neighborhood of Deep East Oakland; it's the subject of the NYT article I posted in the OP. Once one of the worst projects in the city, it's now one of the best. The change can largely be attributed to the complete redesign of the layout; it looks and feels like a nice condo development now as opposed to a mixed-income housing project. The on-site youth center and baseball field are very nice as is the community garden. If the rest of Oakland's projects were like Tassafaronga (they aren't) it would go a long way towards improving the QOL for the working poor in Oakland.

Tassafaronga Village:


Tassafaronga Village by BayRaised, on Flickr

Mark Hogan on Flickr has a ton of shots of the complex's interior and exterior as well:


Tassafaronga Village, Oakland CA by mark.hogan, on Flickr


Tassafaronga Village, Oakland CA by mark.hogan, on Flickr


Lion Creek Crossings in the Lockwood-Tevis neighborhood are another major overhaul of a once derelict project (San Antonio Villas aka 69 Village) but they haven't been quite as successful as Tassafaronga at changing the complex culture; crime is still an issue (albeit relatively minor) in the complex. Compared to what they were like before though they're a huge step up; they were once home to Oakland's most notorious drug crew, the 69 Mob. The crew's leader Felix Mitchell literally made millions of dollars selling drugs out of the complex; his operation was the model for how future Oakland drug rings would operate. He's a legend in Oakland street culture for both his ruthlessness and also his effectiveness at wiping out the competition; he famously booted the Bloods and Crips out of Oakland when they tried to move up North in the early 80's. Here's the video of his presidential-like funeral procession - complete with horse-drawn carriages and 10's of thousands of attendants all up and down Seminary Avenue - after he was murdered in federal prison:

Video Link


The Lockwood Gardens (aka 65 Ville) are the other side of what's locally considered to be one village or "The Ville" for short. Though they were remodeled, they didn't receive the same overhaul that Tassafaronga or Lion Creek Crossings did and as such still look and feel like the projects. It's reflected in the housing culture; it's the far more violent half of The Ville at this point. Most of the kids in both half of the Ville go to Golden State Academy on 66th Avenue, an Aspire charter school within the Ville.

Here's two photos of Lion Creek Crossings courtesy of EBALDC Photos:


lioncreek4 by EBALDC Photos, on Flickr


Lion Creek Crossings National Night Out 2010 photos by EBALDC Photos, on Flickr

Here's two I took of Lockwood Gardens:


Lockwood Gardens by BayRaised, on Flickr


Lockwood Gardens by BayRaised, on Flickr


Marin Way Court in Rancho San Antonio has been the subject of a very interesting property management dispute over the last year; in short, the complex was sold to a developer a year ago for a very small amount of money and he promptly attempted to boot all of the former tenants out (presumably to rebuild it into market rate housing). Here's a quote from an article on it:

Quote:
Oakland – The tenants of Marin Way Court in Oakland have been targeted for displacement by Arroyo & Coates, a San Francisco real estate firm. David Silver is the firm’s executive vice president, and Jamie Clifford is senior vice president.

An April 18 “Notice to Occupants” notified them that the complex was under new management. It also accused the tenants of not having a valid lease and ordered them to move out immediately or risk criminal and civil penalties.

On April 27, the tenants protested in front of their 20-unit housing complex. “We had a great protest rally and everybody from the complex appeared, including about 30 people,” reported tenant Aiyahnna Johnson.

“The protest was held a few days before our housing at Marin Way Court was auctioned off on May 2, 2011. The auction took place in front of the Eastmont Police Traffic Substation in East Oakland.

“It was auctioned off and sold for only $50,000 to David Silver, executive vice president of Arroyo & Coates, while one of his cohorts named Jamie Clifford of the same firm was recording it all on a camera. But it seemed very odd that David Silver was the only one there to bid on Marin Way Court, and I have wondered if the auction notice was ever posted properly in a newspaper,” Johnson said.

Odd indeed. Marin Way Court was a housing project affordable to the poor that consisted of 20 two-bedroom town homes developed in the ‘80s or ‘90s by the now notorious, defunct nonprofit developer Oakland Community Housing, Inc. (OCHI), and its affiliate San Antonio Commons, Inc., and was subsidized by the City of Oakland with around $2 million.

“David Silver and Jamie Clifford of Arroyo & Coates have tried to destroy our community ever since they took over Marin Way Court on May 2, 2011,” Aiyahnna Johnson continued. “They caused us a lot of stress and anxiety in our community by trying to frighten us out of our housing.

“They have been trying to pressure us into signing documents in an effort to force us to move out of our homes and community. It feels like we are now living in a prison. We do not know what to expect next from them.

“Twenty apartments were occupied when David Silver and Arroyo & Coates took control of Marin Way Court on May 2, and now there are only 11 apartments that are still occupied here, and we have been accused of being squatters.”
http://sfbayview.com/2011/marin-way-...-displacement/

It was a very unfortunate situation all-around that eventually resulted in signficant displacement.

Here's two great photos from the article:






Very close-by to Marin Way Court are the Oak Park Apartments in Oak Tree which most notably have the largest Cambodian population of any public housing complex in Oakland. Here's a very interesting video about Cambodian and Latino immigrants and their children living together in the complex:

Video Link



The Jingletown Homes are one of the newest low income housing developments built in Oakland (built in the mid 1990's). What makes them different is that they are buy-only; they sell between $70,000-120,000. They received awards when they were first built for their forward-thinking construction and community building. Currently, the situation is still decent although the north side of Jingletown (where the project is) still experiences more crime than the south side.

Jingletown Homes:


Jingletown Homes by BayRaised, on Flickr
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  #38  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 12:15 AM
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^^ those developments look a hell of a lot nicer than my market rate rental apartment complex --how can I get the government to come in and remodel/redo our neighborhood at no charge lol...
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  #39  
Old Posted Dec 4, 2012, 1:56 AM
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Atlanta has demolished pretty much all of its public housing projects; I believe this effort started in the 90's as the city was gearing up to put on its best face to host the Olympics. Here's a gallery of some of the projects that were razed and some developments that replaced them: http://projects.ajc.com/gallery/view...rojects/5.html
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  #40  
Old Posted Dec 5, 2012, 1:18 AM
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Found some old photos of failed SF public housing projects at the SF Public Library's website:

Geneva Towers


Yerba Buena Plaza



Eddy and Laguna


Laguna and Turk


Valencia Gardens under construction




Sunnydale



Haight and Buchanan:

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