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  #8901  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 7:44 AM
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Joe Gillis Joe Gillis is offline
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For some reason this put me in mind of something



And then I remembered!



http://bagdcontext.myblog.arts.ac.uk...k-rock-cinema/
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  #8902  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 10:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Burbank/Lockheed in camouflage trim (difficult -if not impossible- to locate on MRyerson's Map?

The C-69 Constellation
lapl



Burbank, Jan 9, '43
wiki

wesclark.com
Brings back some old memories. I worked on "Connies" when I was stationed at McClellan AFB in the early 70s.


AVIATIONSGREATS zazzle.com
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  #8903  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 1:12 PM
rick m rick m is offline
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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
I worked at Lockheed for a year or so after high school. I worked in Building 310, at that time (and maybe still) the largest open, unsupported interior in the world. In the thirties, (the story goes) they filmed an episode of 'Tailspin Tommy' at '310' and by opening the huge rolling doors at both ends of the building, were able to fly an airplane through the building! Very cool. I've never seen the film but I have seen this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIZzkq5Y8q0

Oh and, no, neither Lockheed nor Burbank Airport show up on my 'near-pristine, 1942 Shell map of Los Angeles' (which I don't let anybody touch). But they are back in my 1945 Renie Atlas of Los Angeles City and County. (which I do sometimes let people touch)
I too labored away after highschool ( in the Lockheed metal treatment n paint depts) -mid '69 into mid '72- to pay for my 1st car- A-1 was the behemoth structure that had the airport terminal wrapped around the perimeter-Surely THE Earthly version of Dante's Inferno. Later got into a modern bldng up HwdWay to complete a "stock sweep" on the L1011 materials-yeech- quit angrily when they tossed me into the dangerously toxic work of the dread "washrag detail"- Just drove right through the guard gate and escaped to decompress in Palm Springs--
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  #8904  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 2:14 PM
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Originally Posted by rick m View Post
I too labored away after highschool ( in the Lockheed metal treatment n paint depts) -mid '69 into mid '72- to pay for my 1st car- A-1 was the behemoth structure that had the airport terminal wrapped around the perimeter-Surely THE Earthly version of Dante's Inferno. Later got into a modern bldng up HwdWay to complete a "stock sweep" on the L1011 materials-yeech- quit angrily when they tossed me into the dangerously toxic work of the dread "washrag detail"- Just drove right through the guard gate and escaped to decompress in Palm Springs--
Yeah, by the end of my tenure, I was becoming embarrassingly insubordinate. Had I not quit when I did, I'd have been escorted out. Huge company with lots of cultural inertia at that time, still with many people from the war years, and a kind of tribal mentality. Not a good mix for an eighteen year old with 'issues'.

EDIT: Wanted to add that it turned out (to me) they were right all along. Of course it took a couple of years to sink in but they'd seen the Depression and served, in one way or another, in WWII so their tribal instincts were entirely right. My father for many years worked two jobs and was happy to have them. In my whole life I can only remember my father staying home from work one day, just one day in all those years. Those people I worked with at Lockheed knew something about the way the world worked that I didn't. Of course that's the problem with youth, they don't know nuthin.

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Aug 17, 2012 at 3:41 PM. Reason: more thoughts
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  #8905  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 3:32 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Gillis View Post
For some reason this put me in mind of something


And then I remembered!



BD@BR - shot in Burbank rather than Lone Pine?

Lockheed gas pumps, ca. 1941 (by A. Adams)
lapl

Google

________________________

Per some of the Forum contributors, Burbank or Lockheed Airport experienced labor discontent. (It probably had nothing to do with the ample parking facilities?) t'hee

June 1955, machinists picket Flying Tiger facility.
lapl

Lockheed employee parking, 1940. Another Ansel Adams photo. Given rapid expansion of work force at that time, it is probably no surprise that available parking had room for improvement.
lapl

Bank of America at or near Lockheed plant, experiencing growing "pains." Friday -Feb. 6, 1942 (Pay day, or just weekend spending money for a visit to less-crowded Monkey Island?)
lapl

June 22, 1943, transit strike induces Lockheed to "truck" its employees to work. lapl

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  #8906  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 5:57 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Yeah, by the end of my tenure, I was becoming embarrassingly insubordinate. Had I not quit when I did, I'd have been escorted out. Huge company with lots of cultural inertia at that time, still with many people from the war years, and a kind of tribal mentality. Not a good mix for an eighteen year old with 'issues'.

EDIT: Wanted to add that it turned out (to me) they were right all along. Of course it took a couple of years to sink in but they'd seen the Depression and served, in one way or another, in WWII so their tribal instincts were entirely right. My father for many years worked two jobs and was happy to have them. In my whole life I can only remember my father staying home from work one day, just one day in all those years. Those people I worked with at Lockheed knew something about the way the world worked that I didn't. Of course that's the problem with youth, they don't know nuthin.
Photos courtesy of http://wesclark.com/burbank/photos.html A veritable treasure trove.






Entire handbook here: http://wesclark.com/burbank/lockheed_handbook/page1.htm





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  #8907  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 6:16 PM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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  #8908  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 9:07 PM
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Friday Mystery Photo

This lovely overhead shot of...what? Is completely and utterly mislabeled in the USC digital archive. Their caption information is as follows...

"Aerial view, Downtown Los Angeles, Civic Center, City Hall, Los Angeles County Court House, Criminal Courts Building, Spring Street, First Street, Broadway, US-101, 1959"


aerial mystery photo,

A few clues present themselves, the streetlights, Wilshire Specials? Surely not Westwood Specials. No, I guess Wilshire Specials. The parked automobiles, two of which seems blocky and likely early/mid-thirties but the little coupe at the top seems more streamlined, maybe '38ish? The car and pick-up truck(?) behind the cake shop early thirties, too. The cake store sign eludes me, two words, someone's name? An unfenced pond near a public sidewalk? A house in the trees near the pond? A golf course maybe? Two pedestrians? Mother and child? Surely another picture of that cake store exists.
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  #8909  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 10:29 PM
KevinW KevinW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
This lovely overhead shot of...what? Is completely and utterly mislabeled in the USC digital archive. Their caption information is as follows...

"Aerial view, Downtown Los Angeles, Civic Center, City Hall, Los Angeles County Court House, Criminal Courts Building, Spring Street, First Street, Broadway, US-101, 1959"


aerial mystery photo,

A few clues present themselves, the streetlights, Wilshire Specials? Surely not Westwood Specials. No, I guess Wilshire Specials. The parked automobiles, two of which seems blocky and likely early/mid-thirties but the little coupe at the top seems more streamlined, maybe '38ish? The car and pick-up truck(?) behind the cake shop early thirties, too. The cake store sign eludes me, two words, someone's name? An unfenced pond near a public sidewalk? A house in the trees near the pond? A golf course maybe? Two pedestrians? Mother and child? Surely another picture of that cake store exists.
It's the La Brea Tarpits. Look at the sheen on the water.
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  #8910  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 10:34 PM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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It's the La Brea Tarpits. Look at the sheen on the water.
Yup, and the building with the 3 dormers is still there:

http://goo.gl/maps/w9plo
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  #8911  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 10:47 PM
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Remarkable there was no fence even at this late date. You'd think the bones would have tipped em off.
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  #8912  
Old Posted Aug 17, 2012, 11:39 PM
KevinW KevinW is offline
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Here's an aerial from 1924


LAPL


looks remarkably similar to the previous pic. I'd guess the dates are pretty close.
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  #8913  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 12:32 AM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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A fence? George Hancock owned the property and donated it to LA County in 1916. Suppose the County did not deem the natural state of the area worth protecting or an area from which visitors needed protection - until the '50s and '60s. Even then, the fence did not seem to be much of a barrier. Is there a history of people who have gone missing there?

1910


1937, very impressive flagstone walls in second pic, but no apparent fence around the large body of water.



1941


unk date, but seems to span '41 though '60


1962
All from lapl

Last edited by Chuckaluck; Aug 18, 2012 at 12:44 AM.
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  #8914  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 1:35 AM
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The La Brea Tar Pits. ahah!

Thanks Kevin, I didn't realize the La Brea Tar Pits were so bucolic in those years, in my mind I pictured an unimproved tract of pretty much unuseable land. But here it really looks park-like except for the oily sheen on the water which runs counter to my notion of where I'd like to have my house. As for the fence, or lack of a fence, I have to believe the process that had gone on for a few thousand years continued into our stewardship. I have to believe birds, feral cats and the occasional stray dog were caught and ultimately drowned in the pits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProphetM View Post
Yup, and the building with the 3 dormers is still there:

http://goo.gl/maps/w9plo
And I always find it really gratifying when we find a beautiful little building like this has survived. very cool.

Chuckaluck, There's our little, three dormer building peeking through the trees in your 1941 pic. cool.

Now I need to go back and update my flickr captions on this pic.

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Aug 18, 2012 at 1:47 AM.
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  #8915  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 1:55 AM
ProphetM ProphetM is offline
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Chuckaluck, There's our little, three dormer building peeking through the trees in your 1941 pic. cool.
You can see it in the 1924 aerial as well.
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  #8916  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 2:44 AM
rick m rick m is offline
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You can see it in the 1924 aerial as well.
I remember brunching here in early 70s--a creperie as I'm remembering - Then had a good run as the Folk Art And Craft Museum
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  #8917  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 2:57 AM
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You can see it in the 1924 aerial as well.
Yes and the POV is very similar, although from a much wider lens, but I think the cars place my image later by a bit more than a decade.
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  #8918  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 6:46 AM
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For those who aren't aware of it -- a tremendous resource for us city history nerds

I posted elsewhere on this website to let people know about the city-data.com website, and its gigantic repository of historical and architectural thumbnail sketches. Please see my other post for further details. As far as I can tell, although the buildings of certain publicly owned enterprises -- public schools for example -- tend not to be included. But most if not all privately owned or operated houses, apartments, and commercial buildings do seem to come up. Please check out my other post for instructions on how to use this.

If you're the kind of person who, whenever you see an old building, you want to know how old it is, do yourself a favor and check this out.

ETA: This doesn't seem to work so well anymore, since Google took away the quoted phrase capability.

Last edited by Those Who Squirm!; Oct 27, 2013 at 4:51 AM.
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  #8919  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 7:13 AM
Los Angeles Past Los Angeles Past is offline
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Originally Posted by ProphetM View Post
Yup, and the building with the 3 dormers is still there:

http://goo.gl/maps/w9plo

I thought I recognized that building! In the 1960s, that was "The Egg and the Eye" restaurant, one of my mother's favorite Sunday afternoons' culinary destinations (and one of mine, too). They made the most amazing omelets you can imagine! The restaurant was quite famous in those days.

Apparently (and I didn't know this until now), Edith R. Wyle - the woman who owned the egg restaurant - later turned it into the Craft and Folk Art Museum, which it remains to this day.

-Scott


EDIT: Ah, rick m! I see you beat me to it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rick m View Post
I remember brunching here in early 70s--a creperie as I'm remembering - Then had a good run as the Folk Art And Craft Museum
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  #8920  
Old Posted Aug 18, 2012, 2:12 PM
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pico house register ca 1870

Register for the Pico House, June 1870 - May 1872. Sunday, Sept. 11, 1870. Acquisition made possible by the Ramona chapter, Native Sons of the Golden West Autry National Center; 93.21.142


pico house register, detail

Autry Library

The Autry Library and the Braun Research Library are both part of the Autry National Center for the American West, headquartered in Griffith Park.

Autry Library Director Marva R. Felchin shared the photographs in this post. They depict a document from the library's collections that uniquely casts light on early Los Angeles history. Felchin explains:

"Pio de Jesus Pico, governor of California in 1845, built the Pico House in 1870, a luxury hotel intended to help revitalize the old plaza area of Los Angeles. Designed by architect Ezra F. Kysor, Pico House was the first three-story building in Los Angeles and featured gas lighting and indoor plumbing. Pico lost the hotel to foreclosure in 1880. It fell to ruins by the early 1900s and was later deeded to the State of California. The Pico House is California Historical Landmark no. 159, and is sometimes used for art exhibitions and film and television production.

The Pico House hotel register is a unique artifact of Los Angeles history. It documents guests travelling to downtown Los Angeles by date, name and place of residence, during the first two years of the hotel's operation, 1870-1872. Printed on each facing page is a "strangers guide to leading businesses," that reads like a directory of significant names in the development of the city. Many of the people and businesses listed still exist in some form. Researchers, curators and others will find a bounty of information about Los Angeles in the directory whether they are studying the activities of specific individuals or tracing the history of hotel management, for example. In the future, the Autry libraries hope to create a searchable database of the contents, a boon to users as well as the preservation of the artifact."

Register for the Pico House, June 1870 - May 1872. Signature page, Sunday, Sept. 11, 1870. Acquisition made possible by the Ramona chapter, Native Sons of the Golden West Autry National Center; 93.21.14


from theempressofdress.blogspot.com

An aside, when was it that we stopped teaching 'Handwriting' in school?

Last edited by MichaelRyerson; Aug 18, 2012 at 2:30 PM. Reason: forgot to add attribution
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