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Old Posted Apr 2, 2012, 8:33 PM
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HooverDam HooverDam is offline
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Modern Phoenix Home Tour 2012

Every year the fine folks at Modern Phoenix put together the Modern Phoenix Expo & Home Tour. This years tour was in the Marion Estates neighborhood, a rather upscale area on the border of Phoenix and Paradise Valley. The tour featured homes by Frank Lloyd Wright, Al Beadle, Blaine Drake and Ralph Haver, quite the cavalcade of All Star Arizona Architects.

All the info on the homes is a direct copy of what was provided on the Home Tour map. ©2011 modern phoenix

Keep in mind I was just using a cheesy point and shoot camera on 'easy', so the photos aren't award winning or anything, but I hope it gives you a feel and you can enjoy it anyhow.



The Healy/Fearnow Residence

Architect: Alfred Newman Beadle, original 1959 design & extensive 1995 rehab.
Year: 1959
Style: International
Notes: This originally largely wooden home, designed for the family of West Phoenix tract home builder, restaurateur and long time Beadle friend and neighbor Bob Healy, was acquired from the Healys by the Fearnows in 1995. The two year rehab was one of Beadle's last projects. Upgrading the materials palette, Beadle re-envisioned the home as a Modernist classic.





















Kimball Residence AKA Mucha Casa

Design: Ard Hoyt Construction Company. Original Architect unknown, remodled by Woolsey Studio in 1996 & 2004 and landscape by Ten Eyck Landscape Architecture in 2006 & 2012.
Year: 1959.
Style: Midcentury/Contemporary
Notes: Marketed as "Mucha Casa" in its time, this ranch home is a variation on the All Electric House of Light by Ard Hoyt. Architect Kristine Woolsey lifted and enclosed the back patio area to create a subtle and set back contrapposto rhythm of the existing roofline. The desert wash runs seasonally through the newly completed landscape.

















The Adelman House

Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright. Addition by Fred Bloch Assoc. AIA in late 80s.
Year: 1948-50
Style: Usonian Automatic
Notes: As America's postwar housing crisis became real, Mr. Wright turned his thoughts to modular, affordable housing for the average family. His cast-concrete block system was a series of modular units that could be configured to produce a Wright style home. When the owners in the 80s required an addition, molds were used to keep the new wings in harmony with the original structure; though controversial, empowerment was Wrights intent. There are 428 windows in the home and every room has a view.

*note: the owner of this house was a bit eccentric to say the least






























The Boomer House

Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright
Style: Rubble Rock Beach House
Notes: Built in the aftermath of the loss of the Pauson House nearby, the Boomer House was originally intended to be a beach house in Carmel, California. It ended up in the desert foothills instead. Built of redwood and native stone, the sweeping roofline is Boomers most iconic feature. Once hidden behind prolific natural landscaping, the homes heirs are preparing the property for a new generation of enjoyment. The fish pond in the courtyard is the only alteration in decades; the home has been virtually frozen in time since the day it was built.

*the 2nd story of this home featured tiny 6 foot ceilings!












The homeowners planted these flowers for their Moms 100th birthday. She's one of only 9 known people born in Arizona in 1912, the year we became a State and is still alive.





The Buena Terror

Architect: Original unknown. Renovation by Ben Allison in 2007.
Year: 1959
Style: Midcentury Modern/Contemporary
Notes: So named for its rocky metamorphosis from unassuming bank-owned foreclosure to a labyrinth punk rock log cabin, the "Buena Terror" houses organic artwork amidst warm bamboo accents and salvaged industrial furnishings. These provide a striking contrast between its stark modern lines, illuminating light, and stunning view of Camelback mountain.

**I misread our home tour map and thought this was the one property that wasn't allowing indoor photos, turns out, it wasn't. So I only have exteriors of this one unfortunately.









The Beck Residence

Architect: Blaine Drake AIA
Year: 1959
Style: Midcentury Modern
Notes: Aside from a few kitchen appliances this custom home has been preserved by the Beck family since the day it was built. The concrete floors, soldier stacked raw block and mantle free fire place are typical of this Taliesin-trained architects residential work at this time. Extensive built in birch cabinets line at least one wall of every room. The home is in the process of being spruced up after 50 continuous years of habitation.














The Admiral Holcomb House

Architect: Blaine Drake AIA, remodel by Jack Black AIA in 2011
Year: 1956
Style: Midcentury Modern/Contemporary
Notes: The dynamic entryway, corner window, soldier stacked block and minimalist fireplace are all the hallmarks of Blaine Drakes's residential style. In Black's 2011 remodel the old master bedroom was lengthened to make a guest suite while a new wing was added to the back of the home. Gorgeous views of both Camelback and Mummy Mountain make this home special.






















The Desert Residence

Architect: Original unknown, remodeled by Tennen Studio and Tennen Construction.
Year: 1953
Style: Modern
Notes: This home was stripped down to its foundation and rebuilt in its current form, keeping in scale with the surrounding neighborhood and vernacular style. Clever natural lighting fills the spacious rooms. Cast concrete walls lend a rustic, industrial feel.

*this was the home that interior photos weren't allowed, sorry!














The Martin Residence

Architect: Ned Sawyer AIA
Year: 1982
Style: Modern/Contemporary
Notes: A retired couple desired a home "Just for Two" that allowed them to entertain friends and enjoy desert living. The house was designed with an open pan with all areas opening toward a desert view. All spaces are unified by a central circulation spine. The exposed concrete block walls are used to extend the interior spaces and block low summer sun angles. The home was purchased in 2008 by Architect Richard Doria who plans on remodeling the home.











The Weeding Residence

Architect: Original unkown, remodeled by John and Christine Weeding in 2009.
Year: 1952
Style: Modern Contemporary
Notes: An old remuddled ranch home was taken down to the foundation and replaced with a brand new build. The kitchen is so much the heart of the home that it is literally the reception area, reflecting the owners love for entertaining. With generous doors opened up to the back and side, effortless flow meanders through the brand new wraparound landscaping. Check out the huge old Ocotillo on the East side!
















The Hetrick House AKA The Donaldson House

Architect: Ralph Haver, remodeled by Woolsey Studio in 2005.
Year: 1957
Style: Modern/Contemporary
Notes: Fans of Alan Hess' book "The Ranch Home" may recognize this as the Donaldson House. The already altered home needed further renovation, so Woolsey expanded and better connected the rambling ranch. The classic Town and Country model home plan is felt in the front of the home. Great Camelback views are now complemented by a new window wall that opens up on the views of Piestewa Peak.















The Everston House

Architect: Ralph Haver AIA
Year: 1959
Style: Midcentury Modern- split level
Notes: This rare split level home was designed for contractor Sven Everston and was called "Swedish Modern" in its time. It features a pitched roof that is steeper than typical Haver Homes but clad in one of his favorite finishes, wood. The roofline extends to shelter a complete guest suite downhill. Minor alterations make the second story suite a bit more spacious, but the home is otherwise much the same as the day it was built.

* This house was far and away my favorite.





















View of just the top of Downtown from the upstairs porch.






This was a small Cold War era bomb shelter thats been converted to an office




Welp thats all I got, I hope you enjoyed this small tour of desert modernism.

Last edited by HooverDam; Apr 10, 2012 at 5:00 AM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Apr 2, 2012, 9:19 PM
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Nice pictures! I used to despise "modernism/MCM", but lately I've grown to appreciate it more and more. I like the lines and some of the finishes.
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Old Posted Apr 2, 2012, 10:32 PM
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arkitekte arkitekte is offline
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Looks like a nice tour.
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  #4  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2012, 12:51 AM
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I like mid-century modern. Good to see!
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2012, 2:20 PM
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ColDayMan ColDayMan is offline
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I'm diggin' it.
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  #6  
Old Posted Apr 3, 2012, 2:58 PM
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jeremai jeremai is offline
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I want one of those houses... any one will do, I'm not picky! What a great event. Was it one day? You must have been exhausted if it was.

That square toilet seat does not look comfortable!

Thanks for sharing your pictures.
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Old Posted Apr 3, 2012, 4:45 PM
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HooverDam HooverDam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremai View Post
I want one of those houses... any one will do, I'm not picky! What a great event. Was it one day? You must have been exhausted if it was.

That square toilet seat does not look comfortable!

Thanks for sharing your pictures.
Yep the home tour is one day, about six hours, it was pretty tiring. The whole week leading up to the Tour they have different events, talks by architects, film screenings, etc. Its cool and its exciting because now people are coming from other parts of the country to do the tour.

I didn't use the square toilet but those who did said it was indeed uncomfortable.
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2012, 1:33 AM
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Phoenix has a surprising abundance of mid-20th century modernist gems
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Old Posted Apr 4, 2012, 3:56 AM
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xzmattzx xzmattzx is offline
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Nice pictures. The Phoenix area seems to have a wealth of modernist architecture.
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  #10  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2012, 6:25 AM
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HooverDam HooverDam is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Nice pictures. The Phoenix area seems to have a wealth of modernist architecture.
Indeed we do, which stands to reason since PHX's population exploded by about 400% at Mid Century. And thankfully due to groups like Modern Phoenix.net we are getting better and better at preserving our Mid Century Modern gems. The City even helped create the book, Mid Century Marvels about commercial architecture in PHX at mid century, its been very popular. They're hoping to eventually make companion books on Mid Century homes and on Mid Century institutional buildings, ie hospitals, schools, government structures, etc.
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