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  #121  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2009, 5:48 AM
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Is there some requirement in Britain that the doors be painted a different color from the rest of the carriage? It disrupts the natural horizontal lines of the train, making it appear less like a speedy, continuous streak and more like a bunch of boxes.
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  #122  
Old Posted Jul 31, 2009, 1:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiley Person View Post
Is there some requirement in Britain that the doors be painted a different color from the rest of the carriage? It disrupts the natural horizontal lines of the train, making it appear less like a speedy, continuous streak and more like a bunch of boxes.
I don't believe that there is a specific reason as to why doors are of a different colour to the main chassis of the carriage, but I suspect it is for easier identification of where the doors are to allow for speedier access for passengers waiting on platforms.

On a side note - it is mandatory for all National Rail train services (commuter, intercity, airport expresses, even Eurostar), except for the London Underground and DLR to require a yellow front for health and safety purposes.
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  #123  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2009, 3:46 PM
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Charlotte - LYNX light rail

9.6-mile (15.45 km) light rail system opened in November 2007.
There are 15 stations on the line, and 4 additional stations that are trolley only. The trolley only operates on about 2 miles of the line, and 3 of the four trolley stops are on separate tracks. The heritage trolley began operations in 1996 but halted from 2006 to 2008 because of construction of the light rail line.

Rolling stock includes 16 Siemens Avanto trams, similar to those used in Houston, San Diego, Portland, and ordered for Norfolk. There are also 4 restored heritage trolley cars.



7th Street Station - Currently the northern terminus of the line.




Charlotte Transportation Center/Arena station - located above Trade St.




3rd Street/Convention Center station - located above 3rd St., the light rail line then travels through part of the convention center.




Stonewall Station - partially above Stonewall St. and connected to the Westin hotel




Next it crosses I-277


From the Morehead St. bridge, you can see where it crosses I-277, Stonewall Station, and you can even see where it travels through the convention center.




Carson Station - looking towards center city, you can see the Morehead St. bridge


Between Carson Station and Bland St Station


Bland St. Station


Between Bland St. station and East/West Blvd Station:




East/West Blvd. station - looking away from center city


Looking towards center city from East/West Blvd station


New Bern Station - Looking towards center city



From south of here, the rest of the stations are commuter-oriented and have park-and-ride lots, with the southern terminus at I-485 having a large parking deck. I don't really have any photos from these stations as I don't really have much reason to travel there, but I will try to go and take some photos sometime.
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  #124  
Old Posted Aug 1, 2009, 6:36 PM
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^ That's a great looking system. Very nice livery for the trains.
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  #125  
Old Posted Aug 2, 2009, 6:53 PM
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WOW...thanks for the pics...It looks great. The design is very clean
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  #126  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2009, 9:31 PM
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wow, nobody posted Vancouver's rail systems yet.

Metro: SkyTrain (Expo Line, Millennium Line, Canada Line)
Commuter Rail: West Coast Express
Light Rail/Streetcar: Downtown Streetcar

Maybe somebody can post a picture or two of the SkyTrain network and some pics of the rolling stock and a few stations.

In addition, there are other transit components which tie into the bus and rail network to make it more cohesive (mostly due to geography and terrain):

Heavy Ferry: BC Ferries
Pax Ferry: Seabus
Air Transit: Heliport

In addition, there are many water based "light transit" options such as:
Light Ferry: Granville Island Ferries, False Creek Ferries
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  #127  
Old Posted Aug 5, 2009, 5:29 AM
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Vancouver

The three rapid transit lines that run through Metro Vancouver make up Canada's longest metro system; additional there is also a commuter rail line.



The Expo and Millennium lines were opened in 1985 and 2002; the latest expansion the Canada line built in time for the 2010 Olympics will open on August 17th. The system is entirely grade separated with about 2/3rds of the line running on elevated guild ways and 1/3rd running underground.







Taken by SFUVancouver, July 24th, 2009.




Worlds Longest Transit Bridge

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  #128  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2009, 10:23 AM
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what, no love for central and south america on here?

i'll put up the ones i have ridden: mexico, d.f, buenos aires, rio de janiero & sao paulo.

mexico, d.f. metro -- much more extensive than you might think!


rio's small system is sleek and modern -- very wash, dc-like


buenos aires -- oldest and while it could be more extensive, otherwise its great.
they have some gorgeous original old-fashioned wood paneled subway cars, a light rail line and commuter trains too.


sao paulo -- very busy, fairly modern. a new line is long on the way
and i believe they are converting some outer lines to metro lines.
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  #129  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2009, 7:34 PM
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Vancouver has a very nice system, it feels very modern and since a great deal of it is elevated gives it a scenic view. I enjoyed using the system.

As for Pittsburgh, here is a map of the T, after the expansion with the north shore subway it will have about 30 miles of track.



Here is a pic of Station Square:


Wood St Subway station:






And video of getting on the T at Steel Plaza.

Video Link
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  #130  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2009, 8:29 PM
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More of the Pittsburgh T system:

Near Washtington Junction (where the 47 and 42 trains combine for about 1km):


South Park (down the line on the 47 trains, the 44 shuttle is no longer in service)


End of the line at Library, PA near the Washington Co. border


Overbrook Junction:





There is a short, 1km subway tunnel under the south hills suburb of Mt Lebanon on the 42 trains.


Inside of a T train:
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  #131  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2009, 10:34 PM
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Thanks for sharing.
I honestly never knew that Pittsburgh had a rail system at all.
Where have I been?
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  #132  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2009, 11:32 PM
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In Alicante the local rail pretty much only goes along the coast (the further inland you go it's mostly scattered towns, like Alcoi).








http://www.subways.net/spain/alicante.htm
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  #133  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2009, 1:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esirhgih View Post
Thanks for sharing.
I honestly never knew that Pittsburgh had a rail system at all.
Where have I been?
Pittsburgh never got rid of its rail (well not all of it anyway), the LRT system was constructed as an upgraded version of replaced streetcar lines; however, the subway tunnels were planned and constructed in the late 70's, early 80's when the modern T system opened in 1984.

But again, the streetcar system that ran along similar tracks has operated since the 1800's, so Pittsburgh has some unique attributes like some other cities in the northeast/upper midwest region.

They just got finished digging a nearly 2 mile extension of the T under the Allegheny River over to the North Shore.

http://www.theboretotheshore.com/FAQs.html

They are projecting that 14,300 riders, 4.2 million annually, will be riding the 3 new subway stations north of the river.

And for comparisons with the old rail and new rail systems, here is the Martin Villa stop in 1972 and 1999:

Martin Villa 1972 using old PCC streetcars:


Martin Villa in 1999 using the old paint style LRT cars for the new T system:


Cities like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Chicago, Boston, and New York all share some of the oldest continually running rail systems in the country. Pittsburgh is one of the few American cities that has had rail services continuously running since the 1800's when electric streetcars began.

When the T subway extensions are complete, there will be 6 stations underground in the downtown area that are approximately 4 miles in length totally underground, the next 3 stations will open early 2011.

Last edited by Dr Nevergold; Aug 11, 2009 at 1:41 AM.
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  #134  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2009, 12:15 PM
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TECO - Tampa Heritage Streetcar



Source

The current downtown terminus




Crossing 4th Ave


Crossing the mainline


Trolley maintenance facility at 6th Ave


7th Ave looking South


7th Ave looking north


Looking west down 8th Ave


Centro Ybor near 8th Ave and 17th St


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  #135  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2009, 12:50 AM
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Quote:
mexico, d.f. metro -- much more extensive than you might think!
Other way around, to be honest. It's such a huge city, I would expect a really huge system.
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  #136  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2009, 5:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirrus View Post
Other way around, to be honest. It's such a huge city, I would expect a really huge system.
yes it is a very big and old city and so i would have expected it's subways to have been old too (ie., at least around as long as the buenos aires system has), but in fact the mexico city system has only been around since 1969...so i meant fairly extensive for only that relatively short length of time.

here's a blurb i found about it:

Mexico City is one of the biggest cities in the world with a population of approximately 20 million inhabitants. Since 1969 it has been developing a subway system. Now, Mexico City has 11 subway lines with a total length of 201.3 Km (125.8 miles) and 175 stations (106 in subway, 53 at grade, and 16 elevated). All the lines except Line A operate trains with rubber tyres like some lines in Paris and the subways of Montreal and Santiago, Chile. The Mexico City system, as well as those in the Mexican cities of Guadalajara and Monterrey, use symbols, as well as names, for identifying stations.
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  #137  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2009, 5:55 PM
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Our Vehicles under constructon!














Construction had to be put on hold for a day due to sudden flooding!
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Norfolk Light Rail!!!

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  #138  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2009, 4:28 PM
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^Mobius57, where is that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mainstreet View Post
Nick Taylor, are you trying to make us deprived Midwesterners jealous?
Seriously, Nick Taylor, your post gave me a sensory overload. I am very excited to be witnessing and ridding the London rail network in person next week. Are there any regulations or security restrictions against taking photos of trains and/or stations in the UK?
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  #139  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2009, 5:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago Shawn View Post
^Mobius57, where is that?
That's the new light rail in Norfolk, VA.
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  #140  
Old Posted Aug 20, 2009, 10:03 PM
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St. Louis' MetroLink is a light-rail system, but operates more like a heavy rail system because it uses designated rights-of-way (vs. street railways). The Red Line utilizes historic freight train tunnels underneath downown St. Louis and former railroad rights-of-way for most of its path. The Blue Line's subway stations are not historic. Some pics of our beloved MetroLink...

Historic tunnels:








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