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Old Posted Aug 12, 2019, 9:23 PM
plutonicpanda plutonicpanda is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
I have clearly discussed the impact on property taxes. You have not rebutted that argument. Its specific, not general, its math. I challenge you to explain how any other conclusion is possible.
Jesus Christ man you make it hard to respond because of the way you post. I must have missed the impact on property taxes you brought up so I'm guessing you're referring to property lost from ROW acquisition leading to less property tax? If not please explain.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
It most certainly is; unless, of course, you're suggesting that all sprawl will stop, that Houston will have no further population growth, and that no new cars will occupy the newly created lanes.
I am not suggesting sprawl to stop and it won't stop regardless of freeways. Even cities like Vancouver(BC) that have not a single freeway in the city sprawl. Other more low density sprawl further. Sprawl is not mutually exclusive with freeways and how come rail causing sprawl is never an issue? How can you prove this growth in Houston wouldn't happen without additional freeway lanes? I support the sprawl and enjoy it. I will argue it offers a much better QOL than concrete jungles can.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
Perhaps that's what you believe, but I won't make assumptions.

I will simply say I don't find that to be a credible scenario.
Again, what are you defining as induced demand? Demand that is induced and otherwise would not have happened I' assuming, but how do you differentiate from latent demand and induced demand? Where are the numbers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
Where you create new capacity for cars, primarily from existing and u/c and planned suburban areas, those lanes will be back-filled by additional cars creating the effects previously described.
So how come a large majority of freeways outside of the major cities have freeways that flow fine? How come the Katy freeway flows fine during the day? How come I-40 in OKC flows fine years after having been widened?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
I am not suggesting that everyone walk, how absurd.

I haven't suggesting forcing a single existing car off the roads.

I have suggested that strategies be focussed on providing people other, better options, at a lower cost, primarily transit and commuter rail; along with some relocation of some people, whose homes are in danger from floods, w/priority going to areas that are the least cost-effective to service. The result over time is a modest uptick in transit/walking/cycling; which would have the same effect as the new lanes on the highways, because those new riders previously would have been drivers, and such their new choice freed up space on the existing highway at much lower cost.
"better options" is extremely subjective and many would argue what you are proposing is worse than more freeways. S where are your specific proposals on reducing congestion? What car centric cities like LA let alone Houston have had transit projects that reduced congestion? If trains reduce congestion why hasn't the Expo line removed cars from the 10 that had billboards advertising the construction of the expo line?

PS, many of the things you suggest, Houston is actively doing! Making more walk-able areas, building bike paths, building/planning new rail/BRT lines, planning for HSR, etc. Houston is also expanding freeways at the same time doesn't mean they aren't doing other things.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
The comparison is apt, no matter how often you jump up and down turning funny colours suggesting otherwise.

I compared it for land-use, density and modal split.

The suggestion that somehow lessons can't be learned from larger communities to smaller or vice versa makes no sense.

Of course they can.
No it isn't and they can't. To suggest such things reduces any credibility you had. It is borderline comical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
You haven't refuted any of the facts in the comparison......

There are a comparatively limited number of cities in North America where a comparison can be drawn.
Houston can be compared to Phoenix, possibly Denver, Atlanta, etc. Cities are unique and have their own problems, especially cities like Houston. Comparing Houston to a small suburb in Canada is a joke and there is nothing to refute after having read something like that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
Y
But it doesn't matter, because instead of discussing the substance of the idea, you attack me, the messenger.
Except I haven't attacked you and no matter how bad you want that to be true it just isn't. I'm attacking you ideas and beliefs which I find to be extremely flawed and disconnected from the real world. I am apparently, by this thread, not the only one.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Light View Post
But you remain committed to evidence-free discussion.
I have many times. Here are some links spoon fed to you:

https://transfersmagazine.org/does-l...educe-traffic/

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/read...703-story.html

https://www.ridemetro.org/Pages/CurrentProjects.aspx

https://www.cato.org/blog/debunking-induced-demand-myth

https://www.wired.com/2016/04/wideni...-darnit-texas/

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/p...ore-congestion

Yet with all of that I can say you haven't answered my questions and retort with nonsense and running circles. Here. We. Are. Again.