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Old Posted May 25, 2010, 3:15 AM
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Beaudry Beaudry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gsjansen View Post


LAPL



California State Library


i happened upon this undated photo, (my guess is 1900 or so). It's called a panorama of Elysian Heights.


LAPL

it appears to me, that it is taken from on top of fort moore hill looking north west. The house at the intersection which is to the right of the woman standing with the children, appears to be the same house. (it's a tad far to really make out). so if this is the house, i am then further assuming that sunset boulevard is the street that runs at the bottom of the hill, and the intersecting street is north hill street.
Dang, gsj, I'm ruining my eyes staring into that photo. I think you're absolutely right about that being the house. Good catch!

That’s 601 West Sunset. 611 Sunset (now 611 Cesar E. Chavez) – the Wah Wing Sang Gutierrez & Weber Mortuary, was built on the site in 1962. The original building from what I can glean from Sanborn maps was constructed between 1894 and 1906. On the 50s Sanborn maps 601 is labeled with the appellation “Tenements” which pretty much meant its days were numbered.

It’s always been a favorite of mine and its use in Kiss Me Deadly was brilliant – the location manager was a genius, when the script called to “127 Flower”, go over to Sunset & Hill Pl and use that great beast of a thing.

Since KMD is so great I threw it in the computer and took a collection of pix which are below. Be forewarned, my computer for some reason doesn’t wish me to take screen grabs. So these were literally shot with a crap camera at the screen, but they get the job done.





The house from the '06 Sanborn:



And while sometimes addresses provide one with a wealth of noir and horror (noirror?) this one kept its nose clean, at least in the Times. Of course, it was the Hearst papers, not the Chandler, that printed the lurid stuff. But I don't have the Hearst papers online, do I? From 1952:

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