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Old Posted Feb 5, 2011, 12:23 AM
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Beaudry Beaudry is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
If I remember correctly Beaudry has an affinity with the old Southland Hotel that was located at Sixth and Flower.



below: I found these never before seen (on this thread anyway ) photos of the Southland (formerly the Snow).


ebay

above: It looks like there are glass globes (electric?) atop the various pinnacles on the rooftop.
I also like the semi-ornate apartment building on Flower Street that you can see just behind the Southland.





below: The same photo with a slightly different vantage point. Here you can see the neighboring highrises.


ebay






below: A southward continuation of the above photographs.


ebay


This view is looking southeast along Flower Street.
Notice the semi-ornate apartment building that I liked so well in the first photo (in this pic it is far left).
The adjacent building to the south is handsome as well. (also notice the lone house)





below: Southland Hotel ephemera.


Beaudry's collection


Beaudry's collection


Beaudry, I hope you don't mind me using these last two images.
What I mind is that that image -- which I'm assuming was a glass plate? -- I missed out bidding on. Because it would have been miiiine. At least it's recorded here for my slathery worship, thank God.

You have a good eye -- I too like the Seminole Apartments. 620 South Flower. This is the best photo of its facade ON THE PLANET. Whoever now owns this image, I will trade you my Packard for a good blow-up.

And the globes atop the Southland? Yes, I actually dripped actual drool. (And yes, there is something wrong with me and no, I hope it is never cured.)

And e_r, of course I don't mind you using my images herein, that's what my collection is for, and the internet is for, especially sites like these and particularly this thread.

However, I will say this to anyone to whom it may apply (can't presume to speak for other posters on this thread, but let's pretend I do): if I post something cool, whether it be a previously unseen image or some heretofore unexamined research, and you snag said image or idea, credit this thread. That's not only due research diligence but also common courtesy.

Looking up Flower from 7th. The Snow/Southland at the SW corner of 6th. There's the Seminole, mid-block, right.

http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013892.jpg

The Seminole



from http://www.csulb.edu/~odinthor/socal10a.html -- this is a fascinating postcard because it bears no relation to reality. Most postcards don't; and that's ok. But taking "artistic license" and putting it on a corner? Puh-leeeze. Gratuitous fanciful rooftop signage is a hallmark of early hotel postcards but -- placing it on a corner, was that supposed to entice out-of-town rubes to whom the card was sent? In any event, there was in fact an alley to the south of the Seminole. That the postcard makes it look like a street we'll chalk up to Angeleno boosterism.



Guess who built the Seminole? R. B. Young & Son, who built the Young Apts I wrote about earlier today. It opens in the spring of 1911. 72 apartments of two and three rooms each, and 12 single rooms. The exterior was of red pressed brick and marble trimmings. The Orenas being the wealthy Spanish family who owned the block.

What's most notable in the eBay image is that they've added the large Franco-Renaissance northern addition to the Seminole (yep, all one structure according to atlases of the times). I further drool over the cast iron & glass marquis.

Now go back (scroll up) to that image and look at that lone house at 630 S Flower. The houses next to it have had their driveways laid out, but they're still empty lots. By the car I'd guess this to be about...1915? I'm no car expert. But I think I'm about right. And the reason those plots are empty? Our current economic sitch is nothing compared to the Panic of 1910, much less the Recession of 1913-14, where business and trade activity dropped 20-25%. Lest we forget the insane downturn of 1918-19 due to the postwar unemployment jazz. (Never ceases to amuse that people think that whatever's happening now is somehow the a) first and b) worst it has or ever will happen...) In any event, empty plots with driveways. Telling. I still can't believe I don't own this image. I always marry the inquisitive to the acquisitive. So sue me.
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