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thenoflyzone Nov 8, 2018 3:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craneSpotter (Post 8372641)
Makes sense - the DCH-8 will fit right into the family. Sherry Brydson is building quite the little empire...Roy Thomson would be proud.


So Bombardier becomes, essentially, a division of Airbus?

They still have the CRJ and the business jet division.

What's sad with this announcement is that 5000 workers will lose their jobs. Half of them in Quebec.

MonctonRad Nov 8, 2018 3:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thenoflyzone (Post 8372819)
They still have the CRJ and the business jet division.

What's sad with this announcement is that 5000 workers will lose their jobs. Half of them in Quebec.

I was kind of hoping that Bombardier would continue to grow in the passenger business, and become more of a rival to Airbus and Boeing (at least in the regional passenger business). Instead, it appears that Bombardier is withering away.

esquire Nov 8, 2018 3:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad (Post 8372831)
I was kind of hoping that Bombardier would continue to grow in the passenger business, and become more of a rival to Airbus and Boeing (at least in the regional passenger business). Instead, it appears that Bombardier is withering away.

With the CSeries they seemed poised to take the next step toward the top tier, but it's hard to shake the feeling that they have peaked and it's all downhill from here.

DoubleK Nov 8, 2018 3:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad (Post 8372831)
I was kind of hoping that Bombardier would continue to grow in the passenger business, and become more of a rival to Airbus and Boeing (at least in the regional passenger business). Instead, it appears that Bombardier is withering away.

Definitely this. It's sad Canada can't find a way to be a player in this space.

thenoflyzone Nov 8, 2018 4:26 PM

In this era of consolidation and mergers, it was written in the stars that BBD and Embraer would be bought by the big boys....

Pure and simple.

craneSpotter Nov 8, 2018 4:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thenoflyzone (Post 8372892)
In this era of consolidation and mergers, it was written in the stars that BBD and Embraer would be bought by the big boys....

Pure and simple.

It will be interesting to see how Mitsubishi fares with their regional jet.

Yeah, commercial aircraft engineering/development and manufacturing requires massive investments in money, plus requires such specialized personnel and equipment...new models take so much time. Gotta have deep pockets to stay afloat (or good subsidies...)

lubicon Nov 8, 2018 4:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thenoflyzone (Post 8372819)
They still have the CRJ and the business jet division.

What's sad with this announcement is that 5000 workers will lose their jobs. Half of them in Quebec.

3000 jobs in Canada, 2500 in Quebec. What the story does not mention is whether these are net job losses or whether some of them follow with the sale of the Q series and thus may not be actual job losses, just no longer employees of Bombardier.

isaidso Nov 8, 2018 6:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thenoflyzone (Post 8372892)
In this era of consolidation and mergers, it was written in the stars that BBD and Embraer would be bought by the big boys....

Pure and simple.

True although I'd rather see Mitsubishi and Bombardier merge their aerospace division (50 / 50) and try to be a viable 3rd competitor to Boeing and Airbus. They're far stronger together than apart and could launch a successor to the C-Series in 8-10 years. It's a massive blow to see the C-Series fall to Airbus but proves that you need powerful backing to compete. Canada alone wasn't enough but Canada/Japan might be.

I don't think Bombardier should give up on its ambitions.

MTLskyline Nov 9, 2018 2:58 AM

Sounds like Canada Jetlines is planning on serving YHU in 2020. Most likely will start with service to Hamilton I presume. Sounds like YHU is aiming to attract Swoop and Flair as well. They are currently upgrading their runways and a passenger terminal building is being planned.

https://jetlines.ca/2018/11/jetlines...ubert-airport/

http://journalmetro.com/actualites/n...-saint-hubert/

craneSpotter Nov 10, 2018 5:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lubicon (Post 8372936)
3000 jobs in Canada, 2500 in Quebec. What the story does not mention is whether these are net job losses or whether some of them follow with the sale of the Q series and thus may not be actual job losses, just no longer employees of Bombardier.

According to this article - https://www.timescolonist.com/busine...00m-1.23492506

Quote:

As part of the deal, Longview will welcome more than 1,000 Ontario-based employees associated with the production, support and sale of the Dash 8 aircraft. Longview will build the planes out of the original de Havilland manufacturing site in Downsview, Ont. The Downsview site was sold by Bombardier this year, but a lease agreement between Bombardier and the new owners ensure that production will remain on site until at least 2021, the company said in a statement.

Curtis said this will ensure there’s no interruption to the production, delivery and support of the aircraft.

wave46 Nov 13, 2018 1:09 AM

The development of the CSeries - while by all accounts an excellent aircraft - diverted a lot of resources away from the Q400/CRJ lines.

It was a tactical mistake by Bombardier - by aiming for the big boys (Boeing and Airbus), they suddenly were in the sights of the big boys and Boeing was the first to take a swing with the trade complaint. Sensing blood in the water and desperation at Bombardier, Airbus took the chance to get a 50.1% of a plane that had been developed at a cost of $5.4 billion for $1. Not a bad deal. Airbus also won the moral victory when Boeing's complaint was dismissed.

The regional jet and prop markets have much smaller sized competition. It's pretty much Embraer, ATR and Bombardier in that pond. By plowing the billions spent on the CSeries into revamped models to compete with Embraer and ATR, they might have a competitive product for regional airliners, instead of ceding the market. A shame, really, both for Canada and competition in the regional aircraft market.

Our industrial base continually withers. I don't think emulating Australia (i.e. basically only an exporter of natural resources) is good policy in the long-term.

DoubleK Nov 13, 2018 7:55 PM

So what is Bombardier Aerospace now? A holding company with an equity stake in Airbus A220s and the manufacturer of some CRJ business jets? That's all that's left?

J.OT13 Nov 13, 2018 10:46 PM

News regarding he MacDonald-Cartier International Airport in Ottawa.

Quote:

Originally Posted by rocketphish (Post 8377811)
Major renovation about to take flight at Ottawa airport

Mohammed Adam, Ottawa Citizen
Updated: November 12, 2018


Big changes are coming to the Ottawa international airport, with a $25-million renovation inside the terminal that will see a new and expanded food court and retail space, and the relocation of passenger screening to the third floor of the building.

It’s all part of a major, five-year airport transformation that includes a new hotel and a $20-million LRT station. The overall project cost is estimated at $45 million over the next five years.

The work, to be done in phases, will begin next spring with the construction of the enlarged food/retail court and screening facility, which will take 18 months to two years to complete. Airport president and CEO Mark Laroche says successful bids for the new concessions will be revealed next month, followed by contract awards in the spring. Work is to start right after.

The airport also has identified a hotel operator and negotiations are expected to be completed in time for that announcement early in the new year.

Currently, passengers check in luggage with their respective airlines on the third floor, then take an escalator or stairs to the screening area one floor below. Under the new plan, all the restaurants and eateries now on the third floor would be removed to make room for the new security screening facility. The idea is to locate both baggage check-in and security screening on the same floor to improve both security and passenger comfort.

The new food/retail court would be located on a reconfigured second floor, beyond the screening facility (though some food outlets will still be available to non-travellers). Once passengers check in and go through screening, they would go one floor down to sample the expanded food court’s different menus.

“Everywhere you see a restaurant or retail in the airport, it is going to change,” says Laroche. With passenger volumes rising – up four per cent to five million flyers this year – Laroche says the airport has to keep up with the growth. Besides, the airport is rated as the top airport for customer service in its class in North America (airports handling between two million and five million passengers a year), and Laroche wants to keep it that way with more improvements. “We value customer experience. Customer experience is in the culture of this airport,” he says.

Completion of the first phase would be followed by the construction of the hotel on the south side of the parking garage attached to the airport. The hotel will be built over the next five years.

Design work on the elevated LRT station at the northern end of the terminal is now underway, and construction is to begin once the city signs the Phase 2 LRT contract, which includes the airport spur. The station is expected to open by 2023.

The Ottawa Airport will be a beehive of construction inside and outside the terminal over the next five years. Laroche says the airport fully understands that once construction starts, disruptions are inevitable. But in an airport where time is of the utmost importance to flyers and airlines alike, a remedial plan is being prepared. For instance, to minimize disruption, security screening won’t be moved from its current location until its new home on the third floor is completed. Still, passengers will no doubt be affected.

“We are building up new areas inside and outside and there’s going to be a lot of disruption. We are going to have to close things and so we are preparing a campaign to keep our customers informed of what’s coming down over the next five years,” he says. “We want to keep everybody happy to make sure they are having the best possible experience within the context of the construction.”

The airport and its ancillary services employ about 5,000 people, contributing more than $2 billion a year to the Ottawa economy. Laroche says the pain of disruption will be worth it once the work is done. “It is going to be an enhanced airport,” he says.

Mohammed Adam is an Ottawa writer.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local...ottawa-airport

Here's a schematic showing the location of the hotel, O-Train line and station and other future improvements.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MountainView (Post 8376747)
To the south of the parking garage is correct (its more or less south). Probably with a covered walkway connecting it to the terminal.

https://i.imgur.com/SfuUWPu.png


LeftCoaster Nov 13, 2018 10:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Denscity (Post 8364708)
Wow Vancouver way stronger than a Toronto route!?

There are plenty of Vancouver routes that are stronger than Toronto routes...

You really think Toronto-Bucharest is anywhere near Vancouver-Beijing?

The biggest Toronto routes are of course still bigger than the biggest Vancouver routes, but the biggest Vancouver routes are miles larger than the medium and smaller Toronto routes.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cage (Post 8372559)
Viking could acquire rights to Q400 program.

https://theaircurrent.com/scoops/vik...om-bombardier/

Viking Air? The little company from Victoria??

Hali87 Nov 13, 2018 10:58 PM

I'm not sure if this has been posted about yet, but a 747 crashed at YHZ a few days ago. It was a cargo flight and there were luckily no fatalities.

http://i.imgur.com/woWyfGA.jpg
Source

More info

Denscity Nov 14, 2018 5:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LeftCoaster (Post 8378260)
There are plenty of Vancouver routes that are stronger than Toronto routes...

You really think Toronto-Bucharest is anywhere near Vancouver-Beijing?

The biggest Toronto routes are of course still bigger than the biggest Vancouver routes, but the biggest Vancouver routes are miles larger than the medium and smaller Toronto routes.



Viking Air? The little company from Victoria??

Nope don't think the Bucharest flight is even close to the Beijing one haha. But this was a Toronto to huge Indian city change over to a Vancouver to huge Indian city.

TorontoDrew Nov 14, 2018 5:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hali87 (Post 8378268)
I'm not sure if this has been posted about yet, but a 747 crashed at YHZ a few days ago. It was a cargo flight and there were luckily no fatalities.

http://i.imgur.com/woWyfGA.jpg
Source

More info


That's an old looking plane, glad nobody was killed and the the Lobsters got to their destination alright.

esquire Nov 14, 2018 5:33 PM

^ Where are they likely to haul that old bird off to?

drew Nov 14, 2018 5:45 PM

^ probably chop it up on the spot for scrap.

There is some significant damage there.

SpongeG Nov 14, 2018 7:16 PM

where is yhz? hamilton?


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