SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Supertall Construction (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=323)
-   -   NEW YORK | Central Park Tower (Nordstrom)| 1,550 FT | 131 FLOORS (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=191095)

NYguy Dec 22, 2014 8:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ploppalopp (Post 6853291)
Oh, I didn't realize that the developer said that there would be no "gimmick" to boost the height of the building. Do you think cutting buildings off a bit shorter than 1 wtc will be a thing that goes on for years kinda like what happened in philadelphia or not? Anyways, thanks to all who post construction pictures...its great to see them making so much progress on this beast.

I think it's only a matter of whatever a developer wants to do. Developers in New York won't think about that. If they want to build higher and can, it'll get done.


Waaay back on page 17:

Quote:

http://observer.com/2012/11/gary-bar...-foot-tower/2/

By Matt Chaban
11/27/12


...225 West 57th Street, just one block from what was already going to be the city’s tallest apartment building when it opens next year. The new tower’s height, according to building permits filed last week: 1,550 feet.

“There won’t be a spire or anything like that, the floors will go all the way to the top, or almost to the top, with some mechanicals above,” Mr. Barnett said. “This is not a gimmick.”


This was before he had 220 CPS and 111 W. 57th bearing down on his tower.



Love the commentary on the buildings, hadn't seen the video before...;)


Video Link

Ploppalopp Dec 23, 2014 3:34 AM

^^^Thanks for posting that Nyguy. That video really shows how giant this building will be...it's not as skinny or needle-like as I was thinking it would be. This is going to be fun to watch!

NYguy Dec 23, 2014 5:08 AM

^ The building itself isn't in that video, just the site. And this guy should do architectural commentary on all of Manhattan's new skyscrapers.

1Boston Dec 23, 2014 8:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 6854060)
^ The building itself isn't in that video, just the site. And this guy should do architectural commentary on all of Manhattan's new skyscrapers.

and every time randomly bring up earth's sustainability at the end of each one....I would watch :haha:

chris08876 Dec 23, 2014 3:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 6854060)
And this guy should do architectural commentary on all of Manhattan's new skyscrapers.

I agree, but he looks like he's on heroin lol. And the Royal Caribbean music in the background makes it even better. :D

King DenCity Dec 24, 2014 4:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 6854347)
I agree, but he looks like he's on heroin lol. And the Royal Caribbean music in the background makes it even better. :D

Bahaha I agree... I was thinking "This guy loves skyscrapers... wait what drugs is he on...?"

Hypothalamus Dec 24, 2014 5:39 PM

That video is epic lol

Dac150 Dec 24, 2014 6:26 PM

I walked by the site a few days ago - couldn't see anything however it was buzzing with activity.

NYguy Dec 25, 2014 2:39 AM

LOL, I love that video. It gets better every time. Not bashing the guy, but I find it entertaining.

But yeah, the site seems far more busy now (both are).

NYguy Dec 26, 2014 10:21 PM

Shifting focus to the new kid on the block...



http://www.wsj.com/articles/manhatta...014-1419617159

Manhattan Apartment Prices Soar to Record Levels in 2014


By JOSH BARBANEL
Dec. 26, 2014


Quote:

The number of sales recorded for more than $4 million rose to record levels too, including 33 apartments selling for more than $25 million so far in 2014, about 25% more than in 2008. Of these 12 were at a single new condominium, the 1,000-foot tower One57 built by Extell Development Co. on West 57th Street which opened about a year ago. Three sales there were for more than $50 million.

But these sales were topped by a few co-ops on the Upper East Side. At 740 Park Avenue, Israel Englander, the founder and chief executive of a hedge fund, Millennium Management LLC, paid $71.3 million in August for an apartment near one he already owned—a record for a co-op.

Another buyer, Len Blavatnik, a Ukrainian-born American businessman and investor, could soon set a new mark with the purchase of a co-op at 834 Fifth Ave. for about $80 million, a sale that hasn’t closed yet, brokers said.

...Gary Barnett , the president of Extell, said he expects to sell out at One57 in 2015, when he will launch sales of four new condominiums across Manhattan, including another luxury building on West 57th Street.

He said there was a strong overall demand “in all areas of the market, from the low to the top.” And very little supply.

“New development is where the action is,” he said.


ILNY Dec 28, 2014 6:44 PM

From yesterday. More progress.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7526/...c2f9ae8b_h.jpg

NYguy Dec 28, 2014 11:34 PM

The new year will bring us renders (finally), plus this tower reaching street level. This has been an exciting year in NYC skyscraper construction, but next year will be even sweeter.

Alx99 Dec 29, 2014 7:04 AM

once you exit to street certainly progressed more faster

hunser Dec 31, 2014 12:42 AM

Latest filing: http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01

Last Action: APPLICATION PROCESSED - ENTIRE 12/30/2014 (D)

Quote:

Building Height (ft.): Existing: 1550
Proposed: 1550
Building Stories: Existing: 94
Proposed: 94
Dwelling Units: Existing: 233
Proposed: 233
Could very well be a height bump to the old 1,550' figure.

NYguy Dec 31, 2014 6:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hunser (Post 6859894)
Latest filing: http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01

Last Action: APPLICATION PROCESSED - ENTIRE 12/30/2014 (D)



Could very well be a height bump to the old 1,550' figure.


We discussed that on the previous page, but we shall see.

toxteth o'grady Dec 31, 2014 5:06 PM

The fact that a building can go 1500 feet in the air and have only 230 units suggests the supply will be hard-pressed to meet the demand. Though why this wouldn't be happening in Houston and San Francisco is a bit of a mystery.

Submariner Dec 31, 2014 8:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by toxteth o'grady (Post 6860399)
The fact that a building can go 1500 feet in the air and have only 230 units suggests the supply will be hard-pressed to meet the demand. Though why this wouldn't be happening in Houston and San Francisco is a bit of a mystery.

No, it suggests that they are selling large apartments for high prices, the same as the numerous other similarly designed towers are.

chris08876 Dec 31, 2014 8:24 PM

Many of these buyers are on the international level. NYC is a niche market, and it caters to the .001 % of buyers which will be the same ones purchasing units in these developments, and similar ultra-luxury towers. 57th Street is the billionaires market. Also as Submariner mentioned, very large units, sometimes spanning two floors. Something like this could happen in SF with its international presence, but we have to get past the absurd zoning and height regulations first.

NYguy Jan 2, 2015 7:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by toxteth o'grady (Post 6860399)
The fact that a building can go 1500 feet in the air and have only 230 units suggests the supply will be hard-pressed to meet the demand. Though why this wouldn't be happening in Houston and San Francisco is a bit of a mystery.

Not a mystery.


http://www.citylab.com/design/2014/0...ywhere/373493/

Why Can't We Build Skinny Skyscrapers Everywhere?
The limits to how tall and thin towers can be has more to do with markets than engineers.



KRISTON CAPPS
Jun 26, 2014


Quote:

.....In Manhattan, architects are building highest and fastest in Midtown. There, the supertalls aren't just tall—some of them are superskinny, too. A group of buildings along West 57th Street with residential units priced from $5 million to more than $100 million has transformed the Central Park perch into Billionaires Row, a signifier of America's new Gilded Age. In most cases, each unit is basically its own penthouse suite, occupying an entire floor of its building.

Taken on their own terms, the superskinnies represent a feat of architectural design. The new developments going up on West 57th Street may, in fact, be approaching the outer limits of the tall-to-thin aspect ratio for a structure. Just not for the reasons you might think.

"Structurally, there are a lot of very unique challenges, especially for a building that wants a high degree of special views," says Vishaan Chakrabarti, a partner at SHoP Architects and the director of the Center for Urban Real Estate at Columbia University. SHoP—the firm that designed the Barclays Center as well the forthcoming Domino Sugar Refinery development, both in Brooklyn— is responsible for what may be New York's, and the world's, skinniest supertall.

I use that term advisedly: "Supertall" is a category of building defined by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat as between 984 feet and 1,968 feet in height. (Anything much taller than that is, technically speaking, "megatall," and not permitted in the U.S. by the Federal Aviation Administration.) The SHoP Architects project in Midtown—111 West 57th St.—is not only a giant at 1,350 feet. It's also strikingly narrow.

"The majority of the shear load is happening on the east and west façades," Chakrabarti explains, referring to one of the fundamental forces that architects and engineers have to account for in designing buildings. Those façades will boast another bravura element of the design: a system of terra-cotta blocks.

"[The design] gives the building a sense of stability," Chakrabarti says. "It’s a slender building, but a stable building. The main structural challenge is taking the core and using the east and west shear walls to stabilize the building."

Down the road is 217 West 57th St., another supertall, superskinny Midtown tower. This isn't, strictly speaking, the project with the sharpest aspect ratio that architect Gordon Gill has ever designed. That honor belongs to the trident-shaped tower designed by architecture firm Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill for One Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, a $95 billion—billion—mega-development planned by firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM). But 217 W. 57th St. will nevertheless be one of the skinniest towers in Manhattan and the nation.

"The complexity just increases when you get slender," Gill says. "The floorplates become smaller, but the views can become really amazing."

This new kind of skyscraper is popping up all over Midtown—but so far, only there. There are reasons that superskinnies haven't shown up in Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, or other cities. Nor are they likely to get much skinnier in Manhattan.

"From an engineering standpoint, there’s a ways to go," Gill says when I ask him how tall and thin the firm can build. "From an economic standpoint, we’re close to the limit."


"We cut slots, we punch holes, we create notches in the corners of the buildings" to mitigate the effects of wind, Gill says, on tall and thin buildings alike. But there are some places where superskinnies will just never go. No matter how pitched income inequality comes to be in San Francisco, these towers will never rise there. "For areas that are seismic, the slenderer buildings are not advisable," Gill says.

"It stops making sense in terms of elevatoring," Chakrabarti says. Vertical circulation—elevator shafts and related mechanicals—don't get skinnier as a tower does. For a project like 111 West 57th St., where each floor constitutes a single huge apartment, this means that elevators chew up floorplate as you rise. And since the entire tower yields only about 300,000 square feet of residential space, there isn't a lot of square footage to lose.

You could go taller with these skinny towers, but it would require something that no U.S. city has in spades: abundant land downtown available for development. The higher you go, Gill says, "the land area you require increases. Doubles. Triples." At a kilometer high, Kingdom Tower's footprint is still manageable. But at a mile high, the base that a building requires becomes much, much larger.

"You end up carving that stuff up [the base area]," he says. "There’s an economics to it that suggests that at this time, and this place, this is what we can do."

.....In other words, these superskinnies are unique—a "registration of the market," as Chakrabarti calls them. "It is a typology that’s happening, no question," he says, noting that SHoP has at least two more supertalls coming to New York. "But if I look at our overall portfolio, [superskinny, supertall] is not an enormous percentage in terms of square footage."

chris08876 Jan 6, 2015 4:04 PM

Posted this in the supertall thread but I thought it would be appropriate for here. Analyzes luxury market, and some of the supertalls rising. Talks about the fundamentals of highrise building, and relation to slender towers, ect. Lesson on FAR and air rights, and it goes on.

Video Link


Use this as a supplementation to the "Why Can't We Build Skinny Skyscrapers Everywhere?" article posted earlier.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.