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-   -   Rose Quarter Redevelopment (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=152548)

MarkDaMan Jun 8, 2011 5:57 PM

http://djcoregon.com/files/2011/06/0...hematic_02.jpg
(Rendering by Bastien and Associates)

MarkDaMan Jun 21, 2012 9:56 PM

http://media.oregonlive.com/portland...4129-large.jpg
Courtesy City of PortlandHigh density development along Northeast Clackamas Street as envisioned by the N/NE Quadrant Plan.


Rose Quarter plan would ease height, zoning rules
Published: Thursday, June 21, 2012, 12:41 PM Updated: Thursday, June 21, 2012, 2:00 PM
Cornelius Swart, The Oregonian

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/i...ld_ease_h.html

Quote:

A revised plan for redeveloping the Rose Quarter, the Oregon Convention Center and the Lloyd District re-envisions the area as a walkable, high-density urban district with some of the tallest buildings in the city.

Under the plan, a cap across Interstate 5 and a pedestrian/bike bridge would connect the Lloyd District and the Rose Quarter.

The buildings near the east side of the Broadway Bridge could be up to 325 feet tall, and those near the convention center could reach near 400 feet.

The N/NE Quadrant and I-5 Broadway/Weidler Plans, a joint effort by the state and Portland, has no identified sources of funding. But Portland project managers believe easing height and zoning restrictions would encourage private investment.

A draft plan for $400 million worth of transportation projects, including an I-5 widening between I-405 and I-84, was completed June 13.

"In the past we've done a good job redeveloping areas using light rail and streetcar," said project manager Steve Iwata. "This is a new paradigm. By working with ODOT we have a chance to do something centered on a freeway."

Changing zoning
Iwata said the new height allowances are a response to the challenge of working in areas without the urban renewal tools used to redevelop the Pearl District, South Waterfront and downtown.

"The Oregon Convention Center Urban Renewal Area expires in 2013," Iwata said. "So we have to look at new incentives for redevelopment."

The plan would loosen zoning constraints in the Lower Albina Industrial Area north of Northeast Broadway and allow for commercial uses such as film production, back-office space and retail.

Areas along the North Vancouver/Williams Avenue corridor and the site of the Portland Public Schools headquarters on North Dixon Street would receive flexible zoning to encourage investment.

State and city officials are looking toward future federal transportation budgets for money to pay for freeway improvements.

Nonetheless, development in the area appears to be proceeding. Work has begun on a Memorial Coliseum renovation. And in March, Langley Investment Properties announced plans for a 750 apartment development in the Lloyd District.

Iwata said he believes lifting height restrictions might help long-delayed ambitions for a convention center headquarters hotel become a reality.

Height controversy
Not everyone has been happy with the changes, though.

Members of the nearby Irvington Community Association have successfully lobbied to have the plan's height limits lowered from 100 feet to 75 along Northeast Schuyler Street, on the southern edge of the neighborhood. Further height restrictions are under negotiations.

Dean Gisvold represents the association on the N/NE Quadrant's stakeholders advisory group. Gisvold said he was still reading the latest draft of the plan, released earlier this month, but that he thought the concentration of density in some parts was too much.

"I'm OK with 25 stories in Lloyd District," said Gisvold, who worked on the city's landmark 1971 downtown plan. "I don't think (the proposed heights) have any precedent in the city and certainly not downtown. It's going to cause transportation problems, and it's going to be out of scale."

Gisvold said residents preferred to see more of a Main Street design for Broadway up to the Hollywood District.

Planners said lifting height limits would stimulate growth by capitalizing on views and that growth would be multi-modal in nature, meaning residents were expected to use more transit and bikes to get around the area.

The final draft version is scheduled to go before the Portland City Council in October and the Oregon Transportation Commission in December. The current plan will go before a stakeholders committee at 5:30 p.m. at the Calaroga Terrace Auditorium, 1400 N.E. Second Ave., next Thursday.

-- Cornelius Swart

bvpcvm Jun 21, 2012 10:45 PM

http://media.oregonlive.com/portland...ae038fc86d.jpg

Derek Jun 22, 2012 12:51 AM

Me gusta.

davehogan Jun 22, 2012 5:35 AM

Three MAX lines, streetcar, and a bunch of buses and bike tracks? I'm surprised so few developers are publicly on board with it.

zilfondel Jun 23, 2012 11:45 PM

Quote:

Planners said lifting height limits would stimulate growth by capitalizing on views and that growth would be multi-modal in nature, meaning residents were expected to use more transit and bikes to get around the area.
Hmm. Considering that South Waterfront developers aren't even cashing in on the "views," whats the chance they will in the Lloyd?

Planners seem pretty optimistic to me!

Still, Lloyd is defined by its taller buildings. Would like to see some more in that area.

PacificNW Jun 24, 2012 1:35 AM

Wasn't there an agreement with the residents who live on the hills overlooking the So. Waterfront that the towers narrow sides would face the hills so that "their" views of the river and Mt. Hood would not be too obstructed...that along with height restrictions???

zilfondel Jun 25, 2012 10:29 PM

^ Sort of. Tower height was restricted so as not to block views from SW Terwilliger, a historic highway. They did opt for narrow-profiled towers so as to not block as much of the views for the neighbors who live on the slopes of South Portland/Lair Hill, but their views are still blocked to a fair degree. Portland doesn't offer SF-like view preservation by legal fiat or zoning.

Delaney Jun 27, 2012 3:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zilfondel (Post 5746328)
^ Portland doesn't offer SF-like view preservation by legal fiat or zoning.

Portland Zoning Code does. That's what the little "s" means on some lot designations: http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/in...=89965&c=47529

RainDog Jan 31, 2013 4:22 AM

Does anyone know what that walkway/round just south of the intersection of interstate and the steel bridge is? It looks like space for public art of some sort but i haven't seen or heard anything about it.:shrug:

MarkDaMan Jan 31, 2013 6:36 AM

It was one of the shafts for the Big Dig project.

davehogan Feb 6, 2013 6:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Delaney (Post 5747960)
Portland Zoning Code does. That's what the little "s" means on some lot designations: http://www.portlandonline.com/bps/in...=89965&c=47529

Wow, that page 5 map with the proposed freeways gave me pause. I forgot that two of the four places I've lived in Portland would have been torn down for freeways.

eric cantona Oct 22, 2013 11:39 PM

what the what?:

Quote:

Oct 22, 2013, 12:29pm PDT
New group makes pitch for Major League Baseball in Portland

Some eight years after a previous effort fizzled out, another drive has emerged to bring a Major League Baseball team to Portland.

A loosely formed group that includes noted architect Barry Smith and Lynn Lashbrook, founder of Sports Management Worldwide, who’s worked with previous Portland Major League Baseball efforts, is leading the charge. The supporters have hit City Hall to push their cause, meeting with representatives from Mayor Charlie Hales’ office as well as several city commissioners’ aides.
the rest is here: http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...3-10-22&page=2

two things immediately jump out at me:

1. National Register. there's no freaking way that they are going to be able to do this now, if they couldn't before the MC was registered.
2. Barry Smith is a "noted" architect? no offense to him (Mr. Smith), but what is Mr. Giegerich smoking?

having baseball in Portland would be very cool on a number of levels. but to continue to go all Bart Simpson (can I now? no. can I now? no. can I now? no... on and on until Homer gives in) on the MC site seems pretty silly/stupid.

2oh1 Oct 22, 2013 11:56 PM

Memorial Coliseum is such a disaster. Does anyone know how much money has already been spent on trying to figure out what to do next with it? Acoustics are bad. The venue is too small for really big concerts, but it's too big for smaller stuff. As of a few years ago, the biggest use for Memorial Coliseum was assemblies. OMFG! What a waste of such a prime location.

I think the fight over what to do with Memorial Coliseum will live on until an earthquake hits, at which point that sucker is coming down, and let's all hope nobody is in or near it when that happens. I understand the appeal of preserving a significant piece of architecture, but it's a mostly unused piece of architecture, so what exactly are we preserving it for?

2oh1 Oct 22, 2013 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eric cantona (Post 6312220)
what the what?:

the rest is here: http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/...3-10-22&page=2

two things immediately jump out at me:

1. National Register. there's no freaking way that they are going to be able to do this now, if they couldn't before the MC was registered.
2. Barry Smith is a "noted" architect? no offense to him (Mr. Smith), but what is Mr. Giegerich smoking?

having baseball in Portland would be very cool on a number of levels. but to continue to go all Bart Simpson (can I now? no. can I now? no. can I now? no... on and on until Homer gives in) on the MC site seems pretty silly/stupid.

Keep in mind, TMT is working on getting permission to tear down the Cornelius Hotel which is also on the national historic register.

maccoinnich Oct 23, 2013 12:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eric cantona (Post 6312220)
2. Barry Smith is a "noted" architect? no offense to him (Mr. Smith), but what is Mr. Giegerich smoking?

That jumped out at me too. I'd say he's noted for doing terrible work. The student housing by PSU must be the worst new building in the city.

tworivers Oct 23, 2013 4:25 AM

Quote:

2oh1: I understand the appeal of preserving a significant piece of architecture, but it's a mostly unused piece of architecture, so what exactly are we preserving it for?
Um...kind of like the Cornelius?

2oh1 Oct 23, 2013 10:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tworivers (Post 6312491)
Um...kind of like the Cornelius?

I don't disagree. My gripe about TMT wanting to demolish the Cornelius is that they have no plans to develop the site.

tworivers Oct 23, 2013 11:16 PM

Yeah, I don't think TMT should be allowed to demo the Cornelius under any circumstances whatsoever. It should be on the National Register if it's not already; even if they did have a plan to redevelop the site, the building itself is too important.

The discussion around MC is somewhat moot because it is --rightfully-- fully registered as a historic building. It's not going to be torn down and the people behind the new MLB effort are looking pretty clueless. Someday down the road I'm sure that whole area will be redeveloped. Who knows, maybe one day it will be Portland's contemporary art museum...

I'd love to see a baseball stadium get built and I think the PPS site across Broadway would be the perfect location.

bvpcvm Oct 23, 2013 11:25 PM

Is it just me? Baseball doesn't seem very Portland.


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