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BWChicago Apr 11, 2009 4:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdrianXSands (Post 4189106)
i am. and no, it's not. cars are a part of the urban environment.

also, if a person lives in the suburbs, how do they get to the game? metra... transfer to the cta? the park and ride? come on. people drive. accept it.

i'd be much in favor of a replacing the massive amount of wasted space that McDonald's sits on with a retail / garage type thing. (and by retail, yes i do mean more bars)

I suspect that part of the reason is that there is/was a ROW running through the corner of the McDonald's site, from the old freight tracks and Seminary Ave.

http://www.historicaerials.com/featu....aspx?poi=5099

Incidentally, something is going on with the 1932 Gas Station just north of the site. The historic part is staying, but the rest is coming down. Maybe it will be a patio bar or something?

honte Apr 11, 2009 4:49 AM

^ That sounds pleasant, maybe something like Pontiac cafe. I like to see those cool old gas stations stick around.

wrab Apr 11, 2009 1:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdrianXSands (Post 4189106)
.....i'd be much in favor of a replacing the massive amount of wasted space that McDonald's sits on with a retail / garage type thing. (and by retail, yes i do mean more bars)

Amen. A primo franchise site next to one of the nation's most cherished ball parks deserves better than a surface lot. Sometimes I think that Ronald must be a Sox fan.

Quote:

Originally Posted by honte (Post 4189469)
^ That sounds pleasant, maybe something like Pontiac cafe. I like to see those cool old gas stations stick around.

They are very adaptable for reuse, too.

harryc Apr 11, 2009 1:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BWChicago (Post 4189449)
I suspect that part of the reason is that there is/was a ROW running through the corner of the McDonald's site, from the old freight tracks and Seminary Ave.

http://www.historicaerials.com/featu....aspx?poi=5099

Incidentally, something is going on with the 1932 Gas Station just north of the site. The historic part is staying, but the rest is coming down. Maybe it will be a patio bar or something?

An old bridge is still in place at Montrose and the ROW on the E of Graceland is parking, S of Irving the ROW is now the walking path down the E side of the cometary , This ROW curves West at this point and has been built over by townhomes S of Addison (bottom of above photo).

SolarWind Apr 11, 2009 1:56 PM

Greenway Self Park - 60 W. Kinzie
 
April 7, 2009







http://www.greenbeanchicago.com/gree...-wind-turbine/

Parking Structure Incorporates Sustainable Features: Greenway Self Park

By Sharon Hoyer

The notion that an environmentally-minded parking structure is a contradiction will soon be proven wrong. The Greenway Self Park garage, at the corner of Kinzie and Clark, currently under construction and slated for completion in mid-2009, is designed for maximum energy efficiency and minimal waste. The structure, being developed by Friedman Properties, Ltd., will feature several green elements. One of the most notable will be the six vertical wind turbines stacked along the southwest corner. This innovation will provide enough electricity for all of the building’s exterior lighting and contribute excess power directly to the grid.

The vertical-axis Aerotecture turbines will operate regardless of wind direction, harvesting power in winds as low as one to two mph and operating safely and silently in high wind speeds and extreme weather conditions. The southwest location of the turbines will capitalize on Chicago’s northwest winter and southwest summer winds; they are estimated to generate 10,000-15,000 kWh per year.

Natural ventilation, made possible by variable glass channel spacing on the building’s façade, will eliminate the need for energy intensive forced-air ventilation systems. Low-E glass will further reduce energy demand in the retail areas on the ground floor. The garage will also feature a green roof to combat urban heat island effects and rain cisterns to collect grey water for irrigation and maintenance. All construction materials for the building were obtained from within a 500 mile radius.

While addressing the pressing need for more parking in the congested River North area, the new garage will also accommodate energy-efficient transportation. A bike room on the first floor will provide shelter and safe storage for two dozen bicycles. Six plug-in stations for electric vehicles will be available on the first few floors, and more may be added should demand increase. The project is a testament to the possibility and importance of sustainable design in all areas of architecture, even those not immediately thought of as “green.”

http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/631/greenwayselfpark.jpg

http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/9885/...yselfpark2.jpg

honte Apr 11, 2009 2:34 PM

^ Mostly marketing hype. Exterior lighting is what, 5% of the lighting in this thing. So, it will put "excess power" into the grid and then suck it all back out for its internal needs. Naturally ventilated? Weren't they all, back when you could see the cars inside (which it looks like you'll be able to do from the close-up render)? No particular innovation there; I'd call this kind of system more "open air" than "naturally ventilated." 24 bikes... wow, vs. hundreds of cars.

Granted, they didn't need to do any of this, but I don't think it deserves too much praise. Surely it will be hyped as though it's saving the world.

SolarWind Apr 11, 2009 2:56 PM

I can't imagine too many people parking here because it's "green." Location and cost seem like more important factors. I assume Friedman Properties intends to build goodwill and use it to their advantage for future projects.

the urban politician Apr 11, 2009 3:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by honte (Post 4189835)
^ Mostly marketing hype. Exterior lighting is what, 5% of the lighting in this thing. So, it will put "excess power" into the grid and then suck it all back out for its internal needs. Naturally ventilated? Weren't they all, back when you could see the cars inside (which it looks like you'll be able to do from the close-up render)? No particular innovation there; I'd call this kind of system more "open air" than "naturally ventilated." 24 bikes... wow, vs. hundreds of cars.

Granted, they didn't need to do any of this, but I don't think it deserves too much praise. Surely it will be hyped as though it's saving the world.

^ Couldn't agree more.

A parking garage is a parking garage, and you can try to pretty it up but it's basically a giant monument to energy waste.

Either way, I still don't mind it because it replaces a surface lot and its completion will further contribute to the sense of "enclosure" in an area of town that was literally a giant lot 6 years ago (when I lived there)

denizen467 Apr 11, 2009 4:28 PM

Precast sure rockets upwards fast.

denizen467 Apr 11, 2009 4:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SolarWind (Post 4189806)

I wonder if all those surfaces will attract and retain dust, soot, grime and look kind of yucky in 10 years.

Mr Downtown Apr 11, 2009 5:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lawfin (Post 4186682)
Parking proponence and its associated requirements have been one of your shibboleths on this forum for some time especially when it has been criticized in certain downtown developments.

Perhaps you can provide a reference to a post in which I've ever called for more parking. I believe this is a complete list:




Quote:

I find it incredibly curious you have not researched [public transit to Wrigley Field]
Did you really think I don't know that you can get to Wrigley Field by public transportation? I drew the friggin' CTA map.

Unlike many forumers, however, I've slowly become aware that the world doesn't consist entirely of healthy men in their 20s who live along the Red Line. As an exercise in s-t-r-e-t-c-h-i-n-g your mind, let's try a little rôle-playing exercise:

First, let's imagine that you live in Freeport and want to take your family to a Cubs game. Will it seem like a good idea to hold your wailing overtired toddler and keep up with the other two kids while riding a standing-room-only bus back to your minivan at Lane Tech? That night, will it have seemed like a good idea to your wife?

Next, let's imagine you want to take your diabetic dad (who has trouble walking) and his elderly brother to a Sunday afternoon game. How simple does it seem to find a suburban Metra station where nonresidents are allowed to park, make two transfers downtown to get to the Red Line, then walk from the Addison station? Even worse, what happens when you look at your watch after the exciting final out and realize that you're now facing a hour to get back to Union Station, where you'll have to wait two hours for the next train?

Finally, let's imagine you're escorting a group of Cub Scouts from Hoffman Estates to see a major-league game. After extensive research, you've figured out how to ride the bus from Woodfield Transportation Center and convinced the boys' moms that they won't be snatched off the sidewalk by perverts if they're allowed to visit the city. But now the game's over, the wind has turned off the lake, the boys have drunk way too much pop, and you're facing a 90-minute ride back to Schaumburg on a bus—with no bathroom—full of overserved frat boys who are helping the Scouts improve their vocabularies.

Still think anybody who would drive to Wrigley, under any circumstances, is a wanker?

jpIllInoIs Apr 11, 2009 6:01 PM

^ Never thought I would see the day when someone accused Mr. DT of " Not researching" his argument. :koko:

the urban politician Apr 11, 2009 6:39 PM

Gotta agree with Mr. D about the Wrigley story, but also about him never being a parking proponent.

Mr D isn't the parking guy, he's the shadow guy. Get it right, people!!

spyguy Apr 11, 2009 7:36 PM

http://www.chicagobusiness.com/cgi-b...rticleId=31614

Apple picks North & Clybourn
By: Thomas A. Corfman April 13, 2009


...The electronics maker last week agreed to open a signature store on a former gas station site bounded by North and Clybourn avenues and Halsted Street, sources say, after last year turning down a deal in the high-profile Block 37 development. The transaction signals the continued rise to retailing power of the crowded Clybourn thoroughfare and shows that State Street, despite its recent revival, continues to have a hard time attracting well-heeled shoppers.

...Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple, which has been mulling over the North Avenue location for about 18 months, has signed a long-term lease, paying top-dollar annual rent of about $700,000 just for the land, sources say. Apple would build a roughly 15,000-square-foot store, designed by the San Francisco office of architectural firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, sources say.

ChiPsy Apr 11, 2009 8:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denizen467 (Post 4189926)
I wonder if all those surfaces will attract and retain dust, soot, grime and look kind of yucky in 10 years.

Yes, and plastic bags. Can't wait to see them snared in the turbines to complete the "green" aesthetic circle.

At least they'll match the trees.

Abner Apr 11, 2009 8:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by honte (Post 4189835)
^ Mostly marketing hype. Exterior lighting is what, 5% of the lighting in this thing. So, it will put "excess power" into the grid and then suck it all back out for its internal needs. Naturally ventilated? Weren't they all, back when you could see the cars inside (which it looks like you'll be able to do from the close-up render)? No particular innovation there; I'd call this kind of system more "open air" than "naturally ventilated." 24 bikes... wow, vs. hundreds of cars.

Granted, they didn't need to do any of this, but I don't think it deserves too much praise. Surely it will be hyped as though it's saving the world.

The word is greenwashing, and this is a textbook example.

honte Apr 11, 2009 9:43 PM

^ Right. It's not a part of my active vocabulary because it actually sounds happy and pleasant to people not familiar with the coined term. But you are right, I probably could save a few carpal tunnel points with that one. ;)

________

Mr. Downtown, that was hilarious, particularly the introductory statements.

However, I must say this world of mothers-in-labor, 50 pound toddlers, distraught diabetics, and urinating schoolchildren always strikes me as a bit overwrought. Kind of Dargeresque, actually. But I sympathize with the need for driving in the city, and in particular, with the need for better public transit options. Simple things like transit stations that actually sheltered the public from the cold would be a huge step forward.

Will the City ever revisit the notion of coin-operated public toilets, like San Francisco? That was one of the happiest proposals for me, and one of the worst letdowns when it was abandoned. Similarly, what happened to the city ordinance that all gas stations must provide working public restroom facilities?

killaviews Apr 11, 2009 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spyguy (Post 4190091)
http://www.chicagobusiness.com/cgi-b...rticleId=31614

Apple picks North & Clybourn
By: Thomas A. Corfman April 13, 2009


...The electronics maker last week agreed to open a signature store on a former gas station site bounded by North and Clybourn avenues and Halsted Street, sources say, after last year turning down a deal in the high-profile Block 37 development. The transaction signals the continued rise to retailing power of the crowded Clybourn thoroughfare and shows that State Street, despite its recent revival, continues to have a hard time attracting well-heeled shoppers.

...Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple, which has been mulling over the North Avenue location for about 18 months, has signed a long-term lease, paying top-dollar annual rent of about $700,000 just for the land, sources say. Apple would build a roughly 15,000-square-foot store, designed by the San Francisco office of architectural firm Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, sources say.

Sweet! I knew something was about to happen. The CTA moved the 8 bus stop to the north side of the street and new materials were recently delivered to the site. I hope the designed is awesome.

lawfin Apr 12, 2009 7:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by honte (Post 4189835)
^ Mostly marketing hype. Exterior lighting is what, 5% of the lighting in this thing. So, it will put "excess power" into the grid and then suck it all back out for its internal needs. Naturally ventilated? Weren't they all, back when you could see the cars inside (which it looks like you'll be able to do from the close-up render)? No particular innovation there; I'd call this kind of system more "open air" than "naturally ventilated." 24 bikes... wow, vs. hundreds of cars.

Granted, they didn't need to do any of this, but I don't think it deserves too much praise. Surely it will be hyped as though it's saving the world.

Hear, Hear Honte...calling a spade a spade or bullshit, bullshit

lawfin Apr 12, 2009 7:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SolarWind (Post 4189847)
I can't imagine too many people parking here because it's "green." Location and cost seem like more important factors. I assume Friedman Properties intends to build goodwill and use it to their advantage for future projects.

I concur....zoning variance anyone?......I'll just build a green parking garage



gotta love capitalism.....it is the most effecient wealth allocator....but also the most effeciant mechanism for incentivizing gaming the system


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