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jasonashhh Apr 18, 2011 5:45 PM

Halifax Population & Growth
 
Population
Greater Halifax has the largest population east of Qu├ębec City and north of Boston and it ranks thirteenth among all metropolitan areas in Canada. As of the 2006 Statistics Canada 2006, Halifax's population was 372,855 persons, this was an increase of 3.8% over the 2001 Census.

Halifax's population continues to grow; in 2010, Statistics Canada projected that the population had grown 8.1% over 2005 to approximately 403,188 persons.

www.greaterhalifax.com

This just shows we blew what they say our rival Moncton out the water I personally think we should start picking on Quebec City and grabbing some of there ideas and using them for our own. Were not up to population with Quebec City but we can continue to domitate my thought our population was always 375,000 put where up another 26,000 people and that's just 2010 where in 2011 now and more development are taking place like Kings Wharf etc, Like weekend I was in Moncton and I got to admit they ran out of Downtown in two minutes of driving they were back to homes and side streets. Halifax is nowheres near that so lets battle and go after Quebec City i'd say hmmmm? :yes::banana:

Population Quick Facts:

59% of residents are under 45 years of age
More than 1/4 are under 20 years of age
Working age student population of 50,000 - due to 5 post - secondary institutions

someone123 Apr 18, 2011 7:45 PM

Halifax seems to be doing okay. It would be a little more interesting and successful if it were a more popular destination for immigrants. To be honest I also think that population growth is less important than economic growth and city planning. There are bad cities much larger than Halifax and good cities that are much less populated.

Moncton isn't a "rival" in the sense of being a contender for the title of first city in the region. The size difference is too great and a lot of things are lacking in Moncton. They compete in certain specific areas as we've seen with the megaconcerts but don't have the same breadth because of the smaller population and second city status. For example, Halifax has a great deal more local musical talent and live shows. In my opinion that is much more interesting than geriatric rock bands who ran out of steam decades ago (if they were ever creative at all). Similarly look at restaurants or theatre or most other things and it's very one-sided.

MonctonRad Apr 18, 2011 7:56 PM

:previous:

We may be second but we try harder!

:banana::banana::banana:

q12 Apr 18, 2011 8:37 PM

Actually 2nd largest in the region, and a more compareable city to Halifax is
St. John's. It is closing in on 200,000 within its Metro population. People seem to forget about.:rolleyes:

someone123 Apr 18, 2011 9:04 PM

Depends on if "region" means Atlantic Canada or Maritimes. I think looking at just the Maritimes makes a little more sense for the purposes of this discussion.

PoscStudent Apr 18, 2011 9:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by q12 (Post 5246090)
Actually 2nd largest in the region, and a more compareable city to Halifax is
St. John's. It is closing in on 200,000 within its Metro population. People seem to forget about.:rolleyes:

If you actually expand St. John's to the area of other metros or HRM the population would be around 240,000.

MonctonRad Apr 18, 2011 9:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 5246129)
Depends on if "region" means Atlantic Canada or Maritimes. I think looking at just the Maritimes makes a little more sense for the purposes of this discussion.

Agree. I think most people think of the Maritimes as a region. St. John's is actually as far away from Halifax as Montreal is. It's a bit like defining Western Canada as a region. I think it is arguable whether or not BC should be lumped in with the Prairies.

In terms of relative importance of St. John's to NF or Halifax to the Maritimes, I think there is some equivalence there. St. John's however is not in direct competition with Halifax.

BTW, in general terms I am OK with the concept that Moncton is Halifax's little brother. That doesn't mean however that Halifax should expect to win every fight. Occasionally little Johnnie has to win one too..... :)

someone123 Apr 19, 2011 1:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoscStudent (Post 5246153)
If you actually expand St. John's to the area of other metros or HRM the population would be around 240,000.

I guess, but the areas are based off of commuting patterns. And at any rate you could also play the "arbitrary geographical area" game with Halifax and draw an area around the city of 5,000 square kilometres that has over 400,000 in it. It's also possible that St. John's has a smaller population than Moncton within an area of that size.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad
Agree. I think most people think of the Maritimes as a region. St. John's is actually as far away from Halifax as Montreal is.

Basically St. John's is not going to have anything that directly serves people in the Maritimes in any appreciable way. People travel between NS/NB/PEI all the time though, often just for daytrips.

Antigonish Apr 19, 2011 1:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 5245993)
Halifax seems to be doing okay. It would be a little more interesting and successful if it were a more popular destination for immigrants. To be honest I also think that population growth is less important than economic growth and city planning. There are bad cities much larger than Halifax and good cities that are much less populated.

Moncton isn't a "rival" in the sense of being a contender for the title of first city in the region. The size difference is too great and a lot of things are lacking in Moncton. They compete in certain specific areas as we've seen with the megaconcerts but don't have the same breadth because of the smaller population and second city status. For example, Halifax has a great deal more local musical talent and live shows. In my opinion that is much more interesting than geriatric rock bands who ran out of steam decades ago (if they were ever creative at all). Similarly look at restaurants or theatre or most other things and it's very one-sided.

If there was a +/- rating system on this forum you'd get a +1 good post.

Re: Immigrants they are moving in fast the last few years. Theres been roughly 100 Phillipinos immigrated to Antigonish in the last 2 years. The ones I worked with said they are bringing they're families over and moving to Halifax once they gain their citizenship next year.

PoscStudent Apr 19, 2011 5:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 5246498)
I guess, but the areas are based off of commuting patterns. And at any rate you could also play the "arbitrary geographical area" game with Halifax and draw an area around the city of 5,000 square kilometres that has over 400,000 in it. It's also possible that St. John's has a smaller population than Moncton within an area of that size.



Basically St. John's is not going to have anything that directly serves people in the Maritimes in any appreciable way. People travel between NS/NB/PEI all the time though, often just for daytrips.

I was just making a point on the population, I know you don't like Halifax being compared to Moncton or St. John's.

kwajo Apr 19, 2011 5:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad (Post 5246012)
:previous:

We may be second but we try harder!

:banana::banana::banana:

Moncton hasn't even passed other cities in New Brunswick, so looking to Halifax is a bit far off anyway. Saint John is the same size in residential population and has a greater tax, wealth and industrial base than Moncton, the two are twins for all intents and purposes.

someone123 Apr 19, 2011 7:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PoscStudent (Post 5247307)
I was just making a point on the population, I know you don't like Halifax being compared to Moncton or St. John's.

It's interesting to compare cities, but you have to do it carefully to avoid producing a misleading result.

Sometimes of course the aim is to produce a certain result, even if it is misleading and the facts get swept under the rug a little. That I do take issue with.

someone123 Apr 19, 2011 7:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwajo (Post 5247340)
Moncton hasn't even passed other cities in New Brunswick, so looking to Halifax is a bit far off anyway. Saint John is the same size in residential population and has a greater tax, wealth and industrial base than Moncton, the two are twins for all intents and purposes.

Moncton is also well behind Saint John when it comes to history and architecture. In my opinion those are some of the most important characteristics of towns in the Atlantic region because that is what sets them apart from other parts of Canada. The West already has bland suburban towns covered.

q12 Apr 19, 2011 8:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 5247516)
Moncton is also well behind Saint John when it comes to history and architecture. In my opinion those are some of the most important characteristics of towns in the Atlantic region because that is what sets them apart from other parts of Canada. The West already has bland suburban towns covered.

If I had to rank the Downtown area of Cities in Atlantic Canada for their history, architecture, vibrancy, and overall "feel" it would be something like this:
  1. Halifax
  2. St. John's
  3. Saint John
  4. Charlottetown
  5. Fredericton
  6. Moncton
  7. Sydney

And thanks to King's Wharf I would say Downtown Dartmouth could be included in that list somewhere in the middle.

MonctonRad Apr 20, 2011 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by q12 (Post 5247545)
If I had to rank the Downtown area of Cities in Atlantic Canada for their history, architecture, vibrancy, and overall "feel" it would be something like this:
  1. Halifax
  2. St. John's
  3. Saint John
  4. Charlottetown
  5. Fredericton
  6. Moncton
  7. Sydney

While I tend to detect a strong anti-Moncton bias in your posts q12, I do not disagree with your general assessment.

Halifax, St. John's, Fredericton and Charlottetown are blessed by being capitals of their respective provinces and as such, they have large civil service populations and large provincial universities. This contributes to the economic health of the community and provides a strong support to the local art and culture scene.

Saint John tends to be a gritty working class city, but had a golden age in the late 1800's giving the downtown a healthy stock of heritage buildings that gives the city a certain grandeur that still reflects well today.

Moncton on the other hand is the Johnny-come-lately of Maritime cities. Moncton was only a village until about the 1850's, and didn't really start taking off until the 1880's. The core of our downtown tends to date from the early 20th century and the period of major expansion in Moncton dates from the automobile era, hence we tend to be cursed with urban sprawl and suburban strip malls, not unlike the western Canadian cities that someone alluded to. Neither of our two universities and two hospitals are downtown. This is a major liability. Just think if the VGH and Infirmary, as well as Dal and Saint Mary's were located outside the peninsula in Halifax. It would totally change the character of the city.

So, Moncton does have some liabilities but I like the city anyway. I particularly like the non-Maritime-like dynamism and can-do attitude of the community. I am fascinated by the constant growth in the city. If there is an opportunity to be found, the city will exploit it. I have lived here for 20 years and there are 40,000 more people in the city now than when I first moved here. The city is always changing.

The downtown in Moncton will come. I think if we can get a new downtown events centre built, it will make a big difference to the feel of the area. It will spur additional restuarants and pubs and would make downtown living a more attractive option. Like in most cities, if you want commercial growth in the core, you have to convince people to actually live downtown. The future is bright. :tup:

BTW, this discussion really belongs in the Atlantic Canadian section.

Helladog Apr 20, 2011 5:34 AM

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...tneyspears.jpg

:haha:

MonctonRad Apr 20, 2011 11:23 AM

:previous:

True enough!! :haha:

This has deteriorated into yet another SSP pissing contest.

I remember a time about 25 years ago when the population of Halifax was about 287,000 and the population of Moncton was about 95,000.

Now Halifax is a little over 400,000 while Moncton is nearing 140,000.

That magic 400,000 figure sounds so much larger than 287,000 but when you analyze things, not much has changed.............

Halifax was three times larger than Moncton 25 years ago and still is three times larger.

Plus le change, plus le meme chose............... ;)

q12 Apr 20, 2011 1:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad (Post 5247853)
The downtown in Moncton will come. I think if we can get a new downtown events centre built, it will make a big difference to the feel of the area. It will spur additional restuarants and pubs and would make downtown living a more attractive option. Like in most cities, if you want commercial growth in the core, you have to convince people to actually live downtown. The future is bright. :tup:

I do like the downtown area of Moncton that now includes the Marriott Residence Inn along with the Keg, as well there is a nice Italian Restaurant there. This area is a step in the right direction for Moncton improving it's downtown "feel".

kwajo Apr 20, 2011 2:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonctonRad (Post 5248381)
:previous:

True enough!! :haha:

This has deteriorated into yet another SSP pissing contest.

I remember a time about 25 years ago when the population of Halifax was about 287,000 and the population of Moncton was about 95,000.

Now Halifax is a little over 400,000 while Moncton is nearing 140,000.

That magic 400,000 figure sounds so much larger than 287,000 but when you analyze things, not much has changed.............

Halifax was three times larger than Moncton 25 years ago and still is three times larger.

Plus le change, plus le meme chose............... ;)

Haha, well to be fair I was trying to avoid the typical pissing contest by stating that essentially SJ & Moncton are now twin cities and have the potential to really play off of the other's strengths. Seaport in one, airport in another; industry in one, retail in another; urbanity in one, suburban diversity in another; history in one, modernity in another, etc. There are a great many ways of synergizing the two cities - then we can take on Halifax ;)

MonctonRad Apr 20, 2011 2:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kwajo (Post 5248528)
Haha, well to be fair I was trying to avoid the typical pissing contest by stating that essentially SJ & Moncton are now twin cities and have the potential to really play off of the other's strengths. Seaport in one, airport in another; industry in one, retail in another; urbanity in one, suburban diversity in another; history in one, modernity in another, etc. There are a great many ways of synergizing the two cities - then we can take on Halifax ;)

Sounds like a plan to me. Let's have at them! :tup:


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