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-   -   NEW YORK | 111 W 57th St | 1,428 FT | 85 FLOORS (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=198228)

scalziand Sep 25, 2012 7:14 AM

I'm liking the Central Park view more than the backside.

hunser Sep 25, 2012 9:28 AM

Very nice, I like it. Slender is the new sexy, so it seems.
And man look at that last render with One57 owning everyone. :slob:

NYC2ATX Sep 26, 2012 4:35 AM

I'm just dead. Just dead. :banana:

This reminds me of an overgrown adaptation of the Austrian Cultural Forum.

Onn Sep 26, 2012 5:02 AM

Stunning!! Would be nice if it were twice as tall of course... :D

SkyscrapersOfNewYork Sep 26, 2012 5:51 AM

I'm not sold on the black walls surrounding the facade though overall beautiful design, the Saya and 785 8th Ave come to mind. judging by the comparison to the Solow Building it looks to be in the 800 ft range.

colemonkee Sep 26, 2012 7:16 PM

Let's hope they opt for better quality glass panels than they used for the Saya/One Madison Park. The mismatched black glass panels and crappy spandrel glass on the clear glass spans of the Saya almost ruin the tower, but it's saved by it's relatively simple massing. This tower won't have that saving grace as it's massing is all over the place, and the different colored windows on the east face could end up looking very cheap if the same quality of glass is used here.

So almost purely on quality of materials, this could be a stunning tower or an eyesore. I'm hoping Barnett opts for quality.

NYguy Oct 16, 2012 9:23 AM

http://www.nypost.com/p/news/busines...RPnl3lIAT6gVSM

Chess game on W. 57th St.

By STEVE CUOZZO
October 16, 2012

Quote:

Two of Midtown’s greatest blocks, West 57th Street between Fifth and Seventh avenues, stand at the cusp of sweeping change. Between Fifth and Sixth avenues, Gary Barnett’s Extell, Sheldon Solow and Vornado are playing an intricate chess game of strategic acquisition with an eye on major new development.

One block west, Extell’s mighty One57 is rising. Three major new hotels are under construction, including the arresting Roman & Williams-designed Willow and the Park Hyatt inside One57 itself. In addition, a 55-story, “shard”-shaped luxury condo tower is planned at 107 W. 57th, now an empty pit.

It’s in the context of imminent dramatic renewal on all sides that the owners of 57 W. 57th St., at the northeast corner of Sixth and 57th, have been gradually upgrading and repositioning the once dowdy 170,000-square-foot prewar building. Next year, when Fourth Wall Restaurants opens its 200-seat steakhouse, Quality Italian, there, it will mark a watershed for the property owned by the family of Colliers International Tri-State President Michael T. Cohen. They’ve gradually repositioned the former Medical Arts Building — a small hospital that long hid in plain sight — for modern office and retail use.

sbarn Oct 16, 2012 1:30 PM

I wonder when this one will actually get going on this one? It seems like all the permits are in place, must just be a matter of financing.

kickser Oct 16, 2012 3:34 PM

Do we know who the architect behind this tower is?

NYguy Oct 17, 2012 2:30 PM

A list of all the 57th Street projects...

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/1...n_progress.php

J. Will Oct 17, 2012 5:53 PM

I like the design, but it would be better with another 200 feet on it.

NYC GUY Oct 17, 2012 6:53 PM

^^^
True this compliments One 57 and is a good addition.

NYguy Oct 18, 2012 7:13 AM

An extra 200 ft would probably be a stretch for this design, in both meanings of the word...


http://ny.curbed.com/uploads/107-w57.jpg
www.curbed.com

Duck From NY Oct 18, 2012 10:03 AM

It's fine the way it is in my opinion. Not every new building needs to be a supertall. I'm just hoping they get the materials right.

NYguy Nov 12, 2012 9:24 PM

http://archpaper.com/news/articles.asp?id=6346

Tapering Heights
Another tall, skinny residential tower to pierce the sky in Midtown Manhattan.



http://archpaper.com/uploads/image/107_57th_01.jpg


Aaron Seward
11.12.2012

Quote:

The currently empty lot at 107 West 57th Street will soon be home to one of the city’s narrowest tall buildings. Slated for completion in 2014, a mixed-use tower will rise 688 feet in the air from the modest 43-foot-wide by 100-foot-deep site. Developed by JDS Development Group and designed by local architecture firm Cetra Ruddy, the 51-story residential high rise with retail on the first four floors will fit into Midtown’s zoning envelope, its south face stepping and tapering back from the street as it ascends. The firm also designed One Madison Park, the slim tower of stacked cubes on 23rd Street.

“We wanted to create something that would carry its own weight among the Midtown towers, of which there are many,” said John Cetra, a founding partner of Cetra Rudy. In addition to the building’s slender, shard-like character, the architects have given it an active skin treatment that will catch eyes whether up close or from a distance. While the north and south facades will feature floor-to-ceiling transparent glass curtain walls, the lot-line walls, which contain the tower’s reinforced concrete structure, will be clad with dark grey stainless steel panels. The panels are rippled and perforated with a semi-random pattern of holes, which, at night, will reveal a kinetic display of light from thousands of concealed LEDs. “We’re not just exposing a wall of concrete,” continued Cetra. “It’s going to have quite a personality in and of itself. Whatever direction you see it from, it will sparkle with light.”

Containing a total of 105,000 square feet, 107 West 57th Street will have no more than one apartment per floor, including 13 full-floor units, 14 duplexes, and a four-story penthouse. Two elevators housed in a core of concrete shear walls will provide vertical circulation. A tuned-mass damper in the upper mechanical floors will help to reduce building sway and provide a stable environment for residents.

http://archpaper.com/uploads/107_57th_02.jpg

UTEPman Nov 12, 2012 9:46 PM

FINALLY! A New York highrise with some LED lighting incorporated into the design! :notacrook:

Swede Nov 13, 2012 8:34 AM

Love the design. Not only is it tall, it'll look tall too.

/the old building at the corner would have a pretty big presence on my town's skyline.
//and that's in a city with over a hundred subway stations.
///4-story penthouse? another $100M penthouse?

sbarn Nov 24, 2012 11:49 PM

Any speculation when this tower will get started? I think this building will make quite a mark on the Central Park South skyline.

NYguy Nov 26, 2012 5:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Swede (Post 5899698)
///4-story penthouse? another $100M penthouse?

Yeah, the "billionaire's row" becoming more exclusive...:D

Eventually, 57th Street will be paved with Gold.

Flyers2001 Nov 26, 2012 6:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 5914351)
Yeah, the "billionaire's row" becoming more exclusive...:D

Eventually, 57th Street will be paved with Gold.

Richest zip code in a few years time.

nycaddict Dec 15, 2012 5:28 PM

when are they thinking of construction for this one. really looking forward to it.

aquablue Dec 15, 2012 7:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 5914351)
Yeah, the "billionaire's row" becoming more exclusive...:D

Eventually, 57th Street will be paved with Gold.

How about widening the sidewalks and planting small trees in rows, making it look like a real exclusive high-end street? Perhaps they could tax the residents to pay for it, I"m sure they could pony up for it :)

nycaddict Dec 15, 2012 9:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aquablue (Post 5939239)
How about widening the sidewalks and planting small trees in rows, making it look like a real exclusive high-end street? Perhaps they could tax the residents to pay for it, I"m sure they could pony up for it :)

hahahaha i love that idea:tup:

babybackribs2314 Dec 15, 2012 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aquablue (Post 5939239)
How about widening the sidewalks and planting small trees in rows, making it look like a real exclusive high-end street? Perhaps they could tax the residents to pay for it, I"m sure they could pony up for it :)

I actually think this is a great idea. Perhaps they could pedestrianize Broadway all the way to Columbus Circle to pay for it? They could sell the 'air rights' from the portions of Broadway that are made into how it is down around Times Square, and major streets--especially 57th--could be given much more fitting pedestrian amenities. I can't imagine re-designing the street between Columbus &... 3rd Avenue would be too expensive.

As Midtown continues to get denser, especially with the re-zoning imminent, the focus is going to have to really shift totally away from vehicles. Sidewalks in much of Midtown are crammed as-is, and it's time to start planning while we can. If we can't tax the B&T auto commuters, then we might as well make it as difficult as possible for non-taxi/bus/freight services to use Midtown.

uaarkson Dec 16, 2012 9:35 AM

I think this will be another classic.

sbarn Dec 16, 2012 6:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uaarkson (Post 5939899)
I think this will be another classic.

Agreed. The wait for construction to start is painstaking!!

NYguy Dec 16, 2012 6:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babybackribs2314 (Post 5939538)
I actually think this is a great idea. Perhaps they could pedestrianize Broadway all the way to Columbus Circle to pay for it?

I don't really care for that. There can and probably will be pedestrian improvements, but the closing of Broadway hasn't been one of my favorite things, its so un-New York. I'm not an advocate of driving into Manhattan, but one of the things about city life is the streets are filled with people, and yes automobiles. It's part of the urban fabric, the mix that gives the city its flavor and atmosphere. 57th Street, at least on the west side, was once a very touristy destination, but is now becoming a new "Park Avenue" in its own right with these new developments.

Duck From NY Dec 17, 2012 3:49 AM

I'm not fully understanding what all of those notches or panels are on the dark portions of the facade facing the avenues (I'm not talking about the balconies facing Central Park). To me it looks like color variations similar to those on One57's sides. Someone mentioned something about LED lights. I don't know.

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 5940167)
its so un-New York. I'm not an advocate of driving into Manhattan, but one of the things about city life is the streets are filled with people, and yes automobiles. It's part of the urban fabric, the mix that gives the city its flavor and atmosphere.

-
It would also cause severe traffic problems. It's one thing to pedestrianize part of Times Square, but to go much further would be shoving it down people's throats. I know urban planners (particularly the more academic kind) love bicycles, foot traffic, and public transportation, but there will always be a sizable portion of the public who want to live in the suburbs and drive in to the city, traffic be damned. Personally, I love driving all around the city so long as it's nights or weekends.

aquablue Dec 17, 2012 6:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duck From NY (Post 5940678)
I'm not fully understanding what all of those notches or panels are on the dark portions of the facade facing the avenues (I'm not talking about the balconies facing Central Park). To me it looks like color variations similar to those on One57's sides. Someone mentioned something about LED lights. I don't know.


-
It would also cause severe traffic problems. It's one thing to pedestrianize part of Times Square, but to go much further would be shoving it down people's throats. I know urban planners (particularly the more academic kind) love bicycles, foot traffic, and public transportation, but there will always be a sizable portion of the public who want to live in the suburbs and drive in to the city, traffic be damned. Personally, I love driving all around the city so long as it's nights or weekends.

Most european cities have pedestrianized their cores and it is pleasant to enjoy them. I think the average person would enjoy it in NY if they had more car-free areas and I doubt most people would consider it "shoving it down their throats" once they have experienced it. Face it, people are resistant to change and they fear it.. however, they often don't know what they are missing. Having a few more pedestrian zones is not going to prevent the car people from accessing the city or destroy the big NY city feel, come on now! Large European and some Asian cities are very bustling and they strike a good balance between car and pedestrian. NY is need to be a bit more progressive and open to new ideas IMO. I suppose the die hard natives might resist change, but without change, NY will be eclipsed by more innovative cities in the future..




P

Duck From NY Dec 17, 2012 7:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aquablue (Post 5940814)
Most european cities have pedestrianized their cores and it is pleasant to enjoy them. I think the average person would enjoy it in NY if they had more car-free areas and I doubt most people would consider it "shoving it down their throats" once they have experienced it. Face it, people are resistant to change and they fear it.. however, they often don't know what they are missing. Having a few more pedestrian zones is not going to prevent the car people from accessing the city or destroy the big NY city feel, come on now! Large European and some Asian cities are very bustling and they strike a good balance between car and pedestrian. NY is need to be a bit more progressive and open to new ideas IMO. I suppose the die hard natives might resist change, but without change, NY will be eclipsed by more innovative cities in the future..

-
Closing off that much of Broadway would be a traffic nightmare, period. And this isn't Europe, you can't always drag people toward whatever is deemed at the moment to be "progressive". I think you are mistaken if you think suburbanites who work or party in Manhattan won't be seriously turned-off by this idea. I love every moment of being in my car, and I generally dislike public transportation.

This is insanely off-topic, so please PM me to respond.

Crawford Dec 17, 2012 1:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duck From NY (Post 5940864)
-
I love every moment of being in my car, and I generally dislike public transportation.

While I agree that Manhattan avenues shouldn't (and won't ever) be converted to pedestrian-only, your anecdote isn't really relevant to anything.

Someone's personal preferences shouldn't trump the public good, and there are few things more anti-public good than allowing private automobiles to come into Manhattan without paying huge fees.

Really no one needs to drive into Manhattan, and those that do need to pay a hell of a lot more than they currently do. Eventually we'll have congestion pricing and/or tolls on all entryways. There's no other way we're going to be able to function.

sbarn Dec 17, 2012 4:10 PM

I think pedestrianizing streets in Midtown is largely misguided. While Times Square has been successful, others have been less successful. That said, I'm all for pedestrianizing streets in other parts of the city. IMO, places in the Village, SoHo and other places would be amazing as pedestrian only thoroughfares. Mulberry Street, St. Marks Place, even Bleecker or Prince Streets could be nice.

Anyway, this has gotten way off subject.

Duck From NY Dec 19, 2012 5:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 5940955)
While I agree that Manhattan avenues shouldn't (and won't ever) be converted to pedestrian-only, your anecdote isn't really relevant to anything.

Someone's personal preferences shouldn't trump the public good, and there are few things more anti-public good than allowing private automobiles to come into Manhattan without paying huge fees.

Really no one needs to drive into Manhattan, and those that do need to pay a hell of a lot more than they currently do. Eventually we'll have congestion pricing and/or tolls on all entryways. There's no other way we're going to be able to function.

I'm not the only one. A great deal of people come from the suburbs (sometimes even as far a way as Lehigh Valley or New Haven for work every day, or to go to a game, etc). A lot of these people don't particularly want rail access to the city, however misguided you may think that is. Cutting down on the street traffic has its benefits, but I believe the economic benefits from auto commuters will drop if too many streets close.

Quote:

Originally Posted by sbarn (Post 5941112)
IMO, places in the Village, SoHo and other places would be amazing as pedestrian only thoroughfares. Mulberry Street, St. Marks Place, even Bleecker or Prince Streets could be nice.

-
A much better idea. St.Marks used to be pedestrian at times, but then again, St.Marks isn't really St.Marks anymore.

599GTO Dec 19, 2012 6:44 AM

I'm curious to see night renderings of this building.

599GTO Dec 19, 2012 6:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 5940955)
While I agree that Manhattan avenues shouldn't (and won't ever) be converted to pedestrian-only, your anecdote isn't really relevant to anything.

Someone's personal preferences shouldn't trump the public good, and there are few things more anti-public good than allowing private automobiles to come into Manhattan without paying huge fees.

Really no one needs to drive into Manhattan, and those that do need to pay a hell of a lot more than they currently do. Eventually we'll have congestion pricing and/or tolls on all entryways. There's no other way we're going to be able to function.


Yay! More fees! The answer to everything -- higher taxes, and more fees! God knows we don't have enough of that in New York.

And I agree..no way will New York ever to be able to function without higher taxes, more fees! Gosh, I can't wait to finally experience New York when it is a functioning city! God knows New York doesn't function. What a mess of a city. New York will never be a world city until we finally find a way for it to function! Maybe when we can finally get New York to function it will become desirable enough to get people to drop $30mm, $50mm and $100mm on apartments! And we can finally get some tourists to this functioning city! And maybe we can create a world renowned financial system! We'll name it Wall Street!

/sarc.

Just widen the sidewalks, landscape heavily and stfu. I'm so sick of (generally unattractive) pedestrian plazas and shoving more people onto the unbearably crowded and rat infested subway system being the answer to every 'progressive's' wet dream. Or better yet -- take the silly pedestrian plazas to the East Village and Williamsburg and leave money-making Midtown Manhattan alone. It is the richest and most important place on the planet and the last thing it needs is more ridiculous street blockages disturbing commerce and their limos.

nycaddict Dec 19, 2012 12:12 PM

I love this tower but think it would look a lot nicer if it had a pointed top

khaizer007 Dec 19, 2012 1:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 599GTO (Post 5943779)
Yay! More fees! The answer to everything -- higher taxes, and more fees! God knows we don't have enough of that in New York.

And I agree..no way will New York ever to be able to function without higher taxes, more fees! Gosh, I can't wait to finally experience New York when it is a functioning city! God knows New York doesn't function. What a mess of a city. New York will never be a world city until we finally find a way for it to function! Maybe when we can finally get New York to function it will become desirable enough to get people to drop $30mm, $50mm and $100mm on apartments! And we can finally get some tourists to this functioning city! And maybe we can create a world renowned financial system! We'll name it Wall Street!

/sarc.

Just widen the sidewalks, landscape heavily and stfu. I'm so sick of (generally unattractive) pedestrian plazas and shoving more people onto the unbearably crowded and rat infested subway system being the answer to every 'progressive's' wet dream. Or better yet -- take the silly pedestrian plazas to the East Village and Williamsburg and leave money-making Midtown Manhattan alone. It is the richest and most important place on the planet and the last thing it needs is more ridiculous street blockages disturbing commerce and their limos.

New York is "The world city"!! Compared to the other world cities like London and Paris we pay even less taxes and they both seem to be doing pretty good so let's not go too far here. Fact is we do need congestion pricing because of how our city is evolving, we can't just have that many cars in such a congested city so bring on more pedestrian plazas to make it more livable.

aquablue Dec 19, 2012 6:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 599GTO (Post 5943779)
Yay! More fees! The answer to everything -- higher taxes, and more fees! God knows we don't have enough of that in New York.

And I agree..no way will New York ever to be able to function without higher taxes, more fees! Gosh, I can't wait to finally experience New York when it is a functioning city! God knows New York doesn't function. What a mess of a city. New York will never be a world city until we finally find a way for it to function! Maybe when we can finally get New York to function it will become desirable enough to get people to drop $30mm, $50mm and $100mm on apartments! And we can finally get some tourists to this functioning city! And maybe we can create a world renowned financial system! We'll name it Wall Street!

/sarc.

Just widen the sidewalks, landscape heavily and stfu. I'm so sick of (generally unattractive) pedestrian plazas and shoving more people onto the unbearably crowded and rat infested subway system being the answer to every 'progressive's' wet dream. Or better yet -- take the silly pedestrian plazas to the East Village and Williamsburg and leave money-making Midtown Manhattan alone. It is the richest and most important place on the planet and the last thing it needs is more ridiculous street blockages disturbing commerce and their limos.

What an foolish and pathetic diatribe, wow. :uhh: Go be angry and aggressive elsewhere please, this is not a place to tell people to 'STFU' just because you disagree with their ideas. You sound like one of those rich conservatives who has absolutely no idea about cities or the people that inhabit them, but instead care only about those 'limo riding' elites.. what a pathetic selfish attitude. The only thing I know and what makes me laugh with glee, is that I can predict that you are going to be annoyed for years to come as the city becomes even more 'progressive' and implements more and more progressive schemes, and I doubt there is anything people like you can do to stop it. Instead you can get angrier and angrier while the rest of us enjoy a better more livable city. Why don't you move to Houston, you'll be happy there with nobody on the street, no subway and endless highway widening, and NO riff-raff using their silly 'progressive' pedestrian plazas or bike shares, lol.

Oh, and did you know that Tokyo, the city with the greatest GDP on the planet, closes some of its major commercial shopping streets on the weekends to traffic? Did you know that Hong Kong, the financial center of Asia closes many of its streets to shoppers at various times of the day? Did you know that Shanghai, the rising new 'NEW YORK' of Asia, has a huge major commercial street and plaza completely car free? It isn't just the amsterdams, the munichs and the Barcelonas that do this, it is also the cities that are the leading business centers in the world.

Your arguments that such improvements to cities interfere with commerce is completely without foundation and you have no evidence that this would occur in NYC given the same implementation there, you are instead acting out of fear of the unknown.

599GTO Dec 19, 2012 7:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aquablue (Post 5944244)
What an foolish and pathetic diatribe, wow. :uhh: Go be angry and aggressive elsewhere please, this is not a place to tell people to 'STFU' just because you disagree with their ideas. You sound like one of those rich conservatives who has absolutely no idea about cities or the people that inhabit them, but instead care only about those 'limo riding' elites.. what a pathetic selfish attitude. The only thing I know and what makes me laugh with glee, is that I can predict that you are going to be annoyed for years to come as the city becomes even more 'progressive' and implements more and more progressive schemes, and I doubt there is anything people like you can do to stop it. Instead you can get angrier and angrier while the rest of us enjoy a better more livable city. Why don't you move to Houston, you'll be happy there with nobody on the street, no subway and endless highway widening, and NO riff-raff using their silly 'progressive' pedestrian plazas or bike shares, lol.

Oh, and did you know that Tokyo, the city with the greatest GDP on the planet, closes some of its major commercial shopping streets on the weekends to traffic? Did you know that Hong Kong, the financial center of Asia closes many of its streets to shoppers at various times of the day? Did you know that Shanghai, the rising new 'NEW YORK' of Asia, has a huge major commercial street and plaza completely car free? It isn't just the amsterdams, the munichs and the Barcelonas that do this, it is also the cities that are the leading business centers in the world.

Your arguments that such improvements to cities interfere with commerce is completely without foundation and you have no evidence that this would occur in NYC given the same implementation there, you are instead acting out of fear of the unknown.


Tokyo is basically a city of a bunch of poors that keep its GDP sky high. Tokyo is a city of massive government investment (since it's a capital) and New York is a city of commerce. New York is much richer and more productive and they can not be compared in any way.

The idea that New York doesn't function because the entire island of Manhattan isn't a giant pedestrian plaza is ridiculous. New York needs smart growth and the answer to everything isn't shutting down streets for more ugly pedestrian plazas. Where will all these new commuters fit? No, we don't want to live like a bunch of animals like they do in Tokyo, squeezing themselves into the trains like a bunch of cattle in such an inhumane fashion.

http://www.worldofstock.com/slides/TRT2062.jpg

Go back to Tokyo and eat your Ramen in the middle of the cutsey pedestrian plazas and enjoy. It would be a travesty if New York in any way resembled Tokyo or any Asian city. New York is New York and let's keep it that way.

NYguy Dec 19, 2012 7:54 PM

OKAY!!

:order: :order: :order:


THAT IS ENOUGH!

No more commentary that isn't about this building.

Continue your debates in private, thank you.

NYguy Jan 9, 2013 5:22 AM

Article on the towers of the new "gold coast"...
http://observer.com/2013/01/57th-hea...belt/?show=all

TowerVerre:) Jan 9, 2013 5:34 PM

I am sorry if that already was asked but do anyone know when the construction should start?

NYguy Jan 9, 2013 6:53 PM

It's supposed to be completed in 2014, so likely soon.


http://observer.com/2013/01/57th-hea...belt/?show=all


Quote:

Barry Sternlicht, the creator of the W and Starwood hotel chains, had already planted his flag at 107 West 57th Street, having bought the vacant lot from another developer for $52 million in 2005. Last year, Mr. Stern bought into the property for $40 million, and together they’re now planning a shard of an apartment tower, all boutique luxury beauty, shooting up some 700 feet and 50 stories, but only 34 feet wide. With its pointy top, this might become the most expensive toothpick ever made.

But is there really a market for so many multimillion-dollar homes all bunched up together like this? “I think so,” said Jonathan Miller, the master appraiser. “So long as the market isn’t flooded, which it’s really not, and we only get one or two of these projects a year, we should be fine.”

“Remember,” he added, “these buildings are big, but so are the apartments, so there really aren’t that many of them.” One57 has 135 units (plus a Hyatt hotel on the bottom half) and 432 Park has 128, while 107 West 57th Street has all of 27 units planned, each one taking up at least an entire floor and more than half will be duplexes.

Meanwhile, demand is skyrocketing like these towers. Just as these new buildings are in a different class, so are the buyers. “Before, this was a small investment, little more than a hotel room,” Mr. Greenblatt explained. “Now, these are real homes, big homes, with the nicest finishes. These are the type of buyers who own homes all over the world, so that’s what they want.”

Mr. Greenblatt actually believes that there has been pent-up demand for these kinds of apartments for years that is only being worked out now, and that it should last for years, as global wealth continues to concentrate in the hands of the few and find its way into New York and other world capitals.

NYguy Feb 1, 2013 9:48 PM

http://therealdeal.com/issues_articl...n-57th-street/

Battling skyscrapers on 57th Street
In the wake of One57, developers are working on a slew of residential projects in Manhattan’s newest hotbed of development



http://therealdeal.com/wp-content/up...042TRD0213.jpg


February 01, 2013
By Yasmeen Qureshi

Quote:

With its birds-eye views of Central Park, Extell Development’s One57 is setting new records for residential sale prices in the city. But Extell isn’t the only developer seeking to cash in on the area’s potential. A number of new skyscrapers are springing up along 57th Street, from Durst Fetner Residential’s pyramid-shaped condo project on the far West Side to 250 East 57th Street, a 59-story residential tower at Second Avenue.

Fifty-Seventh Street is now one of the most active corridors of new residential development in the city, boasting some of the city’s tallest towers and most buzzed-about architecture. Why is the street having such a moment? Brokers and developers attribute that to a unique confluence of factors, including demographic change, zoning that allows very tall buildings and proximity to the park.

Fifty-Seventh Street, in particular, is attractive to developers because of its location in a special Midtown zoning district with no height restrictions. (Height restrictions begin at 58th Street.) That means developers can build high enough to capture the sought-after Central Park views that very wealthy buyers crave, explained Michael Stern of JDS Development Group.

When it comes to netting the highest possible prices for Manhattan condos, “it’s all about park views,” said Stern, who is in the process of developing a new condo tower at 107 West 57th Street.

So many projects are rising at once, he said, because banks are now more willing to finance new condominiums, after a four-year lull following the financial crisis. And developers like him are seizing the moment, while housing supply is low and the real estate market is picking up steam. “There’s an imbalance between supply and demand coming out of the recession,” he said.

And of course, the sky-high prices at nearby buildings like the Time Warner Center, One Beacon Court and One57 — the New York Observer last month dubbed 57th Street “the Billionaires Belt” — have not escaped developers’ notice.

“Developers are looking at the success [in the neighborhood] and saying, ‘The highest return is to build condominiums,’” said Donna Olshan, president of the brokerage Olshan Realty.

107 West 57th Street

This slender new condo tower is being developed by JDS Development Group and Property Markets Group, the team behind well-received condo conversion Walker Tower. Located on a vacant lot on 57th Street just west of Sixth Avenue, the 700-foot-tall, 52-story building will have around 30 units, Stern said, many of them duplexes. Plans call for roughly 10,000 square feet of retail on the first and second floors. Construction is slated to begin this quarter and be completed in 2014.


http://therealdeal.com/wp-content/up...7th-Street.jpg

yankeesfan1000 Feb 1, 2013 10:28 PM

Hopefully we get some more renderings soon, but nice to see another one get going.

sbarn Feb 2, 2013 4:20 AM

Great although I'll believe it when I see it. I feel like they've been about to start this tower for about a year now. If / when it is built, it may become one of the most remarkable sliver towers in the city.

UTEPman Feb 2, 2013 6:05 PM

my fav project in NY

easy as pie Feb 2, 2013 8:04 PM

completed in 2014?? it hardly seems possible, 55 floors of luxe apartments even with almost no excavation and such small floorplates. let's say in begins in may, that'd be groundbreaking to delivery in ~18 months! awesome aggressive schedule!

JayPro Mar 18, 2013 4:00 PM

IMO new renderings are *long* overdue.

This latest one we've been seeing for months now looks like a pastel drawing from a vantage point that doesn't accentuate it's finer details (i.e. cladding, balcony structure, *real* sense of the building's width...or lack thereof).

I'd especially like to see how this interacts with the CPK/57th St. stretch of the skyline (i.e. a "future skyline" rendering if feasible) and towards Tower Verre.

NYguy Mar 18, 2013 4:45 PM

All permits have been approved, and it work was supposed to begin this quarter. Maybe someone should stop by and check it out.



http://archpaper.com/uploads/107_57th_02.jpg



Older site view...

http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/149261844/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/149261846/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/149261849/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/149261850/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/149261853/original.jpg


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