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cololi Feb 22, 2010 12:49 AM

:previous:
Of course it is not that easy, but I was given a week, so that would be the first step. After that I would budget money to acquire land and build roads, put a form based code in place of the existing zoning ordinance, and use much more modest development goals and incentives to build a human scaled village center, without 200 story buildings. You could get an entire block of development with 5-7 story buildings instead of the 20 story things they are talking about.

SLC Projects Feb 22, 2010 7:16 AM

:previous:
Those are some good ideas. Here's one I had I want to share. ( Tell me what you think ) If or when the Expo Center needs to expand what if the city of Sandy tears up the parking lot, adds underground parking and then adds on to the expo center ( If needed ) ontop of the underground parking so that way you don't have that big parking lot and the building's main doors will be right off of State Street. ( Kind of like what we have downtown with the Salt Palace on West Temple. Just a thought. :rolleyes:

Future Mayor Feb 22, 2010 4:59 PM

:previous:

If and when the expo center does expand I would hope that is exactly what they would do. Maybe have portions of it that are close to the street, with a decent 10' sidewalk, but some additional sections with some set backs for some plazas and gathering space.

This is an area of the valley that I wouldn't mind some over street walkways, one from trax across the street to the Expo Center, maybe halfway between the tracks and State, near the Jordan Commons south entry, that would give expo visitors easy access to the restaurants at the Commons and visitors to the Expo Center easier access from Trax.

I would also like to see the street just north of Jordan Commons develop into some small retail with some accessory apartments above them, maybe even Jordan Commons could place some retail on the north side of the development. Included with this retail and residential they could do a combination of both of the following. Drop state street to half below grade and place a large open air, aesthetically pleasing pedestrian bridge across State, giving access to and from Rio Tinto, and Trax.

Ok I've never claimed to be a great artist, especially since all I'm using is paint, but here is a very rough concept the area around Rio Tinto, Jordan Commons and ST Expo. It includes wider sidewalks all around the blocks, pedestrian bridges to Expo and Rio Tinto, as well as mixed use buildings (purple) keep in mind it's not all inclusive of the area or broken out exactly how it should be, just a rough draft.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2630/...240c35a0_o.jpg

John Martin Feb 24, 2010 11:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by delts145 (Post 4709157)
Former city planning commissioners rail against Holladay Village

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...d-against.html

HOLLADAY — Two former planning commissioners are waging war against Holladay Village Center, saying the planned retail center and apartment complex are contrary to the will of the people...

.

I just noticed this. Hopefully it will blow over. From all of the city planning and ordinance meetings I've attended, I've only been reasserted that the only reason people are opposing this project is differing tastes. I swear, so many people are using the exact same words to describe what they want, but are envisioning totally different things. Regardless, construction should commence as soon as the weather gets a little warmer. There's not much the city planning commission can do (partly because most of the commissioners are for the project, partly because they just don't have much power). Even the chairman would like to see this project move forward, he's just being polite to his neighbors (I should know, he's my dad).

Future Mayor Feb 24, 2010 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Martin (Post 4716779)
I just noticed this. Hopefully it will blow over. From all of the city planning and ordinance meetings I've attended, I've only been reasserted that the only reason people are opposing this project is differing tastes. I swear, so many people are using the exact same words to describe what they want, but are envisioning totally different things. Regardless, construction should commence as soon as the weather gets a little warmer. There's not much the city planning commission can do (partly because most of the commissioners are for the project, partly because they just don't have much power). Even the chairman would like to see this project move forward, he's just being polite to his neighbors (I should know, he's my dad).

The Planning Commission is really just an advisory board, and if the area has been rezoned by Council to allow for the densities being built than it really comes down to an administrative process at that point. If the developer meets the parking requirements, the design and finishing requirements and other other misc requirements that may be in city ordinance than staff can go ahead and approve the project.

Everybody wants a mixed use town center, but they want to be able to drive to it and park and don't want anyone living there. Sort of defeats the purpose of a walkable town center concept. Those that insist on more parking so they can drive there are not the ones that will keep the retail shops in business on a day to day basis, it will be the residents living there and anyone working in the area. The more apartments the better in my opinion. You need a critical mass to support retail.

John Martin Feb 25, 2010 12:09 AM

I agree. The original plan (and by original plan, they mean an idea they had ten years ago) of 12 condos was just silly. To me, the 75 apartments seem obviously essential to the liveliness and success of the project. I'm happy that the area has had a good history of keeping buildings filled and shops running, but they're being awfully optimistic in demanding more retail + fewer residents. It seems like 48th south has been more happening in general since the Cottonwood Mall closed. If it's ever rebuilt, the increased shops wouldn't make sense.

shakman Feb 25, 2010 2:13 AM

I am not too familiar with the demographics of Holladay however I truely believe Holladay Village will be one of those developments that people will eventually warm up to. Deep down inside, it is the factor "change" that I find is the root of the nay sayer's cause. Holladay Village will get built and the nay sayers will at first whine, complain and hold there breath until there faces turn blue, but John Martin stated it perfectly; this will blow over. Change will take its respective place and people will eventually adapt.

...and once again everyone will be one big happy family.

urbanboy Mar 12, 2010 6:50 PM

South Salt Lake studying new redevelopment area
By Rebecca Palmer
Deseret News

SOUTH SALT LAKE — First-year Mayor Cherie Wood has instructed her staff to begin a redevelopment project between Main Street and I-15 at 2100 South.

The Central Point project, if ultimately approved, would allow the city to give property tax breaks to businesses and developers in the project area. Depending on the legal language used to form the district, schools and other tax collectors could also lose money in the deal.

However, redevelopment proponents say the total income generated from new development is worth more than the tax breaks, so taxpayers come out on top.

"It's the way you do business nowadays to get development in the city," Wood said.

The first step will be a study of whether the area is legally blighted. That was approved unanimously Wednesday night by the South Salt Lake City Council, acting as the redevelopment board. Next, city officials will inquire into market conditions, Wood said.

Furniture giant RC Willey, 2301 S. 300 West, will not be part of the redevelopment area. The store was part of a similar tax-break arrangement when it was built years ago; that deal has yet to expire.

No official plans have been aired for Central Point, but it could be an entertainment district for residents who move to the planned Market Station project nearby. Market Station already is part of a redevelopment area, but funding for the luxury condominium and retail project has dried up.

Elected officials hope the new project also will be like a downtown for South Salt Lake, which has long struggled with high crime rates and an identity problem because of its larger neighbor to the north. What is now an aging industrial area near the freeway interchanges known as the "Spaghetti Bowl" could be transformed into a gathering place with restaurants, shops and theaters, city staffers said.

"The city is stepping up economic development efforts," said redevelopment agency director Garth Day, who came to the city in January.

Day added that the site is nearby two major freeways and is intersected by a light rail line. If South Salt Lake's wishes come true, Central Point will also be bisected by the Sugar House trolley line.

"It's really a phenomenal place with a lot of opportunity," he said. "I view it as a game-changer in this valley."

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/7...ment-area.html

urbanboy Mar 12, 2010 7:04 PM

Hamlet Homes Breaks Ground on Townhomes in Fireclay District

Local Murray

The townhomes at Birkhill feature sleek urban architectural designs with brick facades complimented by tree-lined sidewalks and landscaped street medians that add to the beauty of the surrounding area. Photo courtesy Hamlet Homes.
MURRAY — As warmer temperatures embrace the Salt Lake Valley, Hamlet Homes is breaking ground on the construction of 10 new live/work townhomes in Birkhill at Fireclay, with prices starting in the low $180’s. Located at Fireclay Avenue (4250 South) and Main Street, this exciting, mixed-use, transit-oriented development (TOD)—the essence of the Birkhill at Fireclay community—is nestled in the heart of Murray City’s 97-acre Fireclay District.

Designed and developed by Hamlet Homes, these homes for sale in Utah connect Salt Lake County homebuyers with beautiful new condominiums and townhomes, as well as commercial and retail offerings that embrace the best of urban living. For families, a community park and playground located along Big Cottonwood Creek within Birkhill’s perimeter makes outdoor enjoyment convenient and fun. For home-based businesses and commuters, the adjacent Murray North TRAX station is exceptionally convenient and environmentally friendly.

“Birkhill at Fireclay is the epitome of a well-planned, attractively designed urban neighborhood,” said David Irwin, vice president and director of sales and marketing at Hamlet Homes. “Residential, commercial and retail services are intertwined and conveniently located just steps from the Murray North TRAX station, creating a truly walkable urban lifestyle.”

Hamlet Homes’ Birkhill at Fireclay community was the proud recipient of the 2009 Governor’s Quality Growth Award recognizing sustainable design concepts that contribute to improvements to the quality of life in Utah.

Distinctive Design, Energy-Efficient Features
The townhomes at Birkhill feature sleek urban architectural designs with brick facades complimented by tree-lined sidewalks and landscaped street medians that add to the beauty of the surrounding area. Each maintenance-free town home will meet the high standards of Energy Star®.

Five floor plans are available. Each Birkhill townhome has between 1,100 to almost 1,500 square feet of living space. The master bedrooms feature large walk-in closets and some with a garden bath and up to 3.5 baths. The well-designed kitchen includes a countertop island, track lighting and GE Energy Star® appliances. These Utah homes for sale allow homeowners to enjoy features such as energy-efficient windows, progressive light fixtures, modern designed trim, railing and doors. These three-story homes offer a rear-entry one- or two-car garage and customizable flex space on the first floor while providing the convenience of close in living with stunning mountain views.

“Each home has a variety of available options so homebuyers can put personal touches on their new homes,” says Irwin. “No matter how they plan to personalize—from flooring, cabinetry and lighting to countertops, appliances and faucets—Hamlet Homes will work with each homebuyer to provide the ideal home for them. And, our homes are backed with a 10-year Quality Builder’s Warranty (QBW).”

A Live/Work Lifestyle
A collaboration between Hamlet Homes and JSA Architects (based in Salt Lake City) has created a unique high-tech, cosmopolitan look for these Utah homes. These exceptionally comfortable townhomes provide a true live/work opportunity with a street-level floor plan that is perfect for a home-based business or occupation (graphic designer, writer, accountant, artist, attorney, therapist, realtor, etc.) or simply additional living space.

“In 2007, 23 million Americans were reported as self-employed, a number that has grown significantly in the past two years,” said Irwin. “We are thrilled to offer a home designed with entrepreneurs in mind, a place where they can live and work in comfort and convenience and just moments from the Murray North TRAX station, said Irwin”

The community also features UTOPIA Community MetroNet™’s high-speed fiber optic technology, to connect family, friends and businesses via advanced voice, video and Internet communications. Every one of the Utah homes for sale is ready for high-speed Internet use.

When completed, the 21-acre Birkhill community will contain more than 230 residential units, including condos and townhomes, as well as 150,000-square feet of office and retail space. This offers homeowners, retailers and businesses the opportunity to enjoy a dynamic place in which to live, work and play.

The Birkhill at Fireclay sales center is located at Fireclay Avenue (4250 South) and Main Street and is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., closed Sundays. For information about residential and commercial availability, contact Phil Mosher at (801) 506-9662 or visit Hamlet Homes online at www.hamlethomes.com.

http://www.realestatenewsutah.com/ne...district-21713

arkhitektor Mar 12, 2010 7:19 PM

:previous: Here are some pictures:

Existing Condo building:
http://i40.tinypic.com/1534d5i.jpg

New Townhomes:
http://i43.tinypic.com/2uy0xug.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/15x5q2w.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/ruogvm.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/5eu4gl.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/2mfetsh.jpg

delts145 Mar 14, 2010 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John Martin (Post 4716779)
I just noticed this. Hopefully it will blow over. From all of the city planning and ordinance meetings I've attended, I've only been reasserted that the only reason people are opposing this project is differing tastes. I swear, so many people are using the exact same words to describe what they want, but are envisioning totally different things. Regardless, construction should commence as soon as the weather gets a little warmer. There's not much the city planning commission can do (partly because most of the commissioners are for the project, partly because they just don't have much power). Even the chairman would like to see this project move forward, he's just being polite to his neighbors (I should know, he's my dad).

John, I suspect I've probably met with your Dad and his team. I was extremely impressed with their vision for Holladay. These naysayer, nimby residents are obviously clueless, about what makes a truely classy village center. Like Shakman said, this will blow over after it's established, and the narrow minded can see how well it functions.

Very cool ARK, I love Fireclay!

TonyAnderson Mar 14, 2010 7:03 PM

At the same time I think it's good for the residents to participate and ensure this is the type of development they would like to see. Holladay obviously isn't Salt Lake City, where anything may go.

I suppose these units are apartments because there's not a condo market there right now?

John Martin Mar 14, 2010 10:42 PM

They're apartments because for some reason they couldn't have condos above retail. I don't know whether it's because of an ordinance or the builder's demands, but I'm thinking it was the former.

Right now it seems like the main qualm is just the quantity of apartments. There were a lot of people originally complaining about the fact that they were apartments and not condos, but they shot themselves in the feet with the off-the-wall manner of their complaints. There's a large, trashy apartment/condo complex down the street called Aix La Chappelle, which is notorious for having more "problematic" low-income residents. Back in the day, it was considered the gold standard in terms of luxury, so a lot of people are concerned that another large complex of apartments could end up the same way eventually.

shakman Apr 2, 2010 11:20 PM

NSA Data Center
 
I read from a couple of sources that the short list for NSA's Utah Data Center is suppose to be revealed sometime during the last week of March. Well it has passed. Does anyone know which contractors made the short list?

TonyAnderson Apr 4, 2010 5:20 AM

That Fireclay 'wall' is pretty amazing. I'd love to see more similar developments.

Here's some other Salt Lake MSA happenings.

Quote:

UTA seeks big mixed-use development in Sandy
Community » Complex would be built around the 10000 South TRAX station.

By Christopher Smart

The Salt Lake Tribune
Updated: 03/17/2010 12:16:19 PM MDT


Why not build a housing and retail center right on the TRAX line?

It sounds like a good idea to the Utah Transit Authority, which owns 35 acres around its TRAX station at 10000 South in Sandy.

Private sector developments, such as the City Creek Center downtown, are being built with transit in mind. But the Sandy proposal will be the first such "transit-oriented" project in which UTA acts as the developer.

The transit authority is embarking on the project in conjunction with private-sector Wasatch Advantage Group, said UTA spokesman Gerry Carpenter.

"It is a project designed to be attractive to people looking for a lifestyle that doesn't use the automobile all that much," he said. "Maybe they would have one car for recreation, but otherwise would walk to restaurants and shops or ride transit downtown for things like Jazz games."

The project is in the early planning stages, but as envisioned would eventually include 864,000 square feet of residential space made up of rental apartments and condos, a 175-room hotel, 350,000 square feet of office space, 100,000 square feet of retail, and 3,200 parking spaces.

http://www.sltrib.com/news/ci_14680405?source=rss
Quote:

Cultural marketplace coming to West Valley City
Community » West Valley City wants to build a gateway to its diverse population.

By Jennifer W. Sanchez

The Salt Lake Tribune
Updated: 03/31/2010 02:06:47 PM MDT

West Valley City
» Asian markets. Latino shops. Eateries with international cuisines.

These are the types of businesses slated for the Jordan River Marketplace that might be under construction by late summer.

The 22-acre development will become a neighbor of the Utah Cultural Celebration Center in West Valley City and will cost more than $156 million.

The marketplace will be a family-oriented place where visitors can spend the day eating, shopping and using the nearby Jordan River Parkway. There will be benches, fountains and cultural icons from various countries, said Bob Murri, Ascent Construction marketing director
Quote:

Daybreak Ranked as 6th Best Selling Master Planned Community in the U.S. for 2009

Tue, 03/23/2010 - 10:15
http://www.realestatenewsutah.com/ne...-us-2009-22437

http://www.realestatenewsutah.com/si...m/files/01.jpg
Solar-paneled house located in Daybreak, South Jordan

South Jordan (Rio Tinto) – Kennecott Land’s Daybreak community was ranked as the sixth best selling master planned community in the United States for 2009 by RCLCO (Robert Charles Lesser & Co., LLC), a leading independent real estate advisory firm.

While the total number of net sales in 2009 for the majority of the top 20 best-selling MPCs dropped from 2008 levels, Daybreak was an exception to this trend. In 2009, 375 homes were sold in Daybreak, which resulted in a 7 percent increase over 2008. Nearly one out of every five new homes sold in Salt Lake County was in Daybreak.

http://www.realestatenewsutah.com/ne...-us-2009-22437

arkhitektor Apr 6, 2010 7:23 PM

West Valley City is slowly getting less crappy than it used to be.
Below are some pics from the mall renovation at Valley Fair and the TRAX station across the street:

http://i40.tinypic.com/sotwmq.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/2d0nk2w.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/5yw7mf.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/34oynow.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/fa6h3q.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/sb1p8m.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/ap74sp.jpg

http://i43.tinypic.com/1408rt.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/zik7pv.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/2j7687.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/34s45di.jpg

http://i42.tinypic.com/2d1l5h.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/20zqmp5.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/n1xtfk.jpg

http://i39.tinypic.com/309rfif.jpg

http://i44.tinypic.com/2dkkgld.jpg

John Martin Apr 6, 2010 8:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by arkhitektor (Post 4783326)
West Valley City is slowly getting less crappy than it used to be.
Below are some pics from the mall renovation at Valley Fair and the TRAX station across the street:

http://i41.tinypic.com/34s45di.jpg



Gee, I like dad's shirt. If he got it at Valley Fair Mall then I'm definitely shopping there!

jedikermit Apr 6, 2010 11:17 PM

Ha! That was one of the first things I noticed too, John!

I am glad they're making improvements, hopefully it will bring in more upgrades over time. When does that TRAX spur open again?

TonyAnderson Apr 7, 2010 1:08 AM

The West Valley line looks to be making some good progress. Maybe Trax can help the city and its image.

RFPCME Apr 9, 2010 4:03 AM

NSA at Camp Williams
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by shakman (Post 4778713)
I read from a couple of sources that the short list for NSA's Utah Data Center is suppose to be revealed sometime during the last week of March. Well it has passed. Does anyone know which contractors made the short list?

Shakman:

In all my 25-plus years of bidding contracts to the Federal government, there is one rule--you take the decision schedule and add months to it. This is especially true with a $1.5B construction project in today's economy. There are so few large, public construction projects going on, which is exactly the opposite of what the economy needs in my opinion, that each bidding contractor will scrutinize the selection process if they don't win, hoping to find grounds that they can base a protest of the decision on. So the Feds are being very careful. My guess is that the Feds are trying to find as many ways as possible to divvy up the project to as many contractors as they can, so the Government can avoid protests to its decision. That's usually the way it works. If the decision gets protested, it will drag on and on. The Air Force new tanker program is a classic example.


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