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combusean Dec 11, 2020 2:37 AM

The MS study has better source data than self-reported polls by several orders of magnitude.

https://blogs.microsoft.com/on-the-i...rve-americans/

Anyways, I'm done with this.

TJPHXskyscraperfan Dec 11, 2020 3:11 AM

This is an interesting conversation, kinda the young vs old like Breakfast Bitch in the dining thread,lol. Yeah, anyone without high speed internet is probably in a rural area, old, or can’t afford it. And if they can’t afford internet they probably aren’t going to movie theatres anyway. Streaming services in general are much cheaper that going to the movies. Most are around $10 bucks a month as opposed to going to a theatre for one night for easily 40 or 50 bucks after soda and popcorn for two people. That being said, movie makers will lose big time if releasing movies Right away at home become the norm. I think it is temporary for new movie releases, at least big movies. I still love going to the movies, I can’t duplicate movie theatre pop corn! I love the big screen and surround sound! All this being said, I’ll still go to the theatre because it is something to do and still pay for every streaming service there is and TV service,lol, cause I need entertainment and sports. That being said, I think about 1/4 of theatres will prob close and yeah, somebodies going to probably buy AMC.

Obadno Dec 11, 2020 3:17 AM

Half of the country isn't lacking broadband internet. More than half the country has smart phones, More than half the country has a Facebook page and streams youtube and Spotify and Netflix.

Im sure Microsoft just wants to get a big juicy federal contract to "spread broadband to the masses"

TJPHXskyscraperfan Dec 11, 2020 3:29 AM

I wish that many people didn’t have broadband. I work for Cox Communications, that would mean a lot more opportunity,lol, but the market is pretty saturated. Yeah, rural areas, and even just some farm homes, big lots, we have a hard time getting service to or it’s just not cost effective.

YourBuddy Dec 11, 2020 5:26 AM

Movie theaters aren’t going away. Movie makers still want that money especially from huge releases and there will still be demand for going to movies. You will definitely see older movie theaters or theaters that aren’t dine in close or renovate. Streaming is huge, but there is money to be made in the experience of a night at the movies. Just not right now.

PHXFlyer11 Dec 11, 2020 5:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YourBuddy (Post 9130812)
Movie theaters aren’t going away. Movie makers still want that money especially from huge releases and there will still be demand for going to movies. You will definitely see older movie theaters or theaters that aren’t dine in close or renovate. Streaming is huge, but there is money to be made in the experience of a night at the movies. Just not right now.

Movie theatres were going away even before the pandemic, this has only made it worse. AMC lost a to of money last year and were already on the verge of bankruptcy. Will some survive, sure. But many more will fail and most will have to change their model.

Obadno Dec 11, 2020 5:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHXFlyer11 (Post 9131131)
Movie theatres were going away even before the pandemic, this has only made it worse. AMC lost a to of money last year and were already on the verge of bankruptcy. Will some survive, sure. But many more will fail and most will have to change their model.

The Pandemic only accelerated what was already in process.

More work from home, more remote working, untethering certain industries from expensive big costal cities (SF and NYC), flights to sunbelt cities and the interior, Millennials finally biting the bullet and moving into single family homes en mass, changes in retail patterns deliver/vs brick and mortar. The destruction of traditional movie distribution

The only industry I expect to end up going back to pre pandemic normalcy will be hotels and restaurants. I dont personally suspect people will largely work from home forever but for sure certain industries will forevermore have much more work from home availability and a larger portion of their workforce will be remote.

I am actually very excited to see and hope to see a revival of smaller cities and towns nationwide, there are plenty of people with good careers that would much rather live in a relatively smaller city or town that are forced to live in larger metro areas. I know plenty of people with decent incomes in Finance or Supply Chain that can be 100% remote and would move to Prescott or Show Low in a heartbeat if they could.

PHXFlyer11 Dec 11, 2020 6:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Obadno (Post 9131192)
The Pandemic only accelerated what was already in process.

More work from home, more remote working, untethering certain industries from expensive big costal cities (SF and NYC), flights to sunbelt cities and the interior, Millennials finally biting the bullet and moving into single family homes en mass, changes in retail patterns deliver/vs brick and mortar. The destruction of traditional movie distribution

The only industry I expect to end up going back to pre pandemic normalcy will be hotels and restaurants. I dont personally suspect people will largely work from home forever but for sure certain industries will forevermore have much more work from home availability and a larger portion of their workforce will be remote.

I am actually very excited to see and hope to see a revival of smaller cities and towns nationwide, there are plenty of people with good careers that would much rather live in a relatively smaller city or town that are forced to live in larger metro areas. I know plenty of people with decent incomes in Finance or Supply Chain that can be 100% remote and would move to Prescott or Show Low in a heartbeat if they could.

Agree. I rarely went to the movies before the pandemic. Probably less after. But I will want to go on occasion, but it's less often. And i'll be willing to pay more for a better experience when i do go. I feel like the majority of the people are in that same boat.

And yes, travel should really bounce back from a consumer perspective, but I think for business it will take a decade to return to pre-covid levels.

TJPHXskyscraperfan Dec 11, 2020 7:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Obadno (Post 9131192)
The Pandemic only accelerated what was already in process.

More work from home, more remote working, untethering certain industries from expensive big costal cities (SF and NYC), flights to sunbelt cities and the interior, Millennials finally biting the bullet and moving into single family homes en mass, changes in retail patterns deliver/vs brick and mortar. The destruction of traditional movie distribution

The only industry I expect to end up going back to pre pandemic normalcy will be hotels and restaurants. I dont personally suspect people will largely work from home forever but for sure certain industries will forevermore have much more work from home availability and a larger portion of their workforce will be remote.

I am actually very excited to see and hope to see a revival of smaller cities and towns nationwide, there are plenty of people with good careers that would much rather live in a relatively smaller city or town that are forced to live in larger metro areas. I know plenty of people with decent incomes in Finance or Supply Chain that can be 100% remote and would move to Prescott or Show Low in a heartbeat if they could.

Well said

RichTempe Dec 11, 2020 9:14 PM

I would think that if the studios decide to release everything to streaming we're going to see a lot fewer big budget 'blockbuster' movies. There's not way WB or Disney can recoup $200-$300 million on some the movies they do by putting it on a streaming service for $10 - $15 a month. There may be fewer theaters around, but the if the studios want these big movies they will still need people paying $15 a seat in a theater to make them pencil out.
Also, do the big stars want to be television or big screen stars? This does make a difference to some actors and could have an effect on what parts they'll consider doing based on where the film is released.

ASU Diablo Dec 11, 2020 10:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichTempe (Post 9131399)
I would think that if the studios decide to release everything to streaming we're going to see a lot fewer big budget 'blockbuster' movies. There's not way WB or Disney can recoup $200-$300 million on some the movies they do by putting it on a streaming service for $10 - $15 a month. There may be fewer theaters around, but the if the studios want these big movies they will still need people paying $15 a seat in a theater to make them pencil out.
Also, do the big stars want to be television or big screen stars? This does make a difference to some actors and could have an effect on what parts they'll consider doing based on where the film is released.

Think what Disney Plus did with Mulan. They skipped the theatres and released it for $29.99. And then they made it available as part of the monthly streaming package.

This is what i envision the future model to be...

YourBuddy Dec 11, 2020 10:06 PM

I didn’t see it but wasn’t Mulan a disappointment with how much it made off that model.

biggus diggus Dec 11, 2020 10:16 PM

If movies only went straight to streaming devices I would probably never see a new release again. Thankfully *lots* of people think my way and movie theaters will still be in demand.

Just like e-readers and tablets were going to do away with books, right?

ASU Diablo Dec 11, 2020 10:35 PM

Blockbuster says “Hold my Beer”

PHXFlyer11 Dec 11, 2020 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by YourBuddy (Post 9131453)
I didn’t see it but wasn’t Mulan a disappointment with how much it made off that model.

That is true, however I think there is a way to do it. They didn't get it right the first time, but I by no means think that means that streaming isn't the way to go. They need to try a different formula: rent price point, buy price point, subscription price, what's included in subscription, etc. There's a formal they need to perfect based on consumer behavior. They'll figure it out.

There are a few examples I can think of:

1) Offer higher priced subscription that includes new releases in the cost
2) Offer a discount on new releases for those who purchase subscription

ASU Diablo Dec 11, 2020 11:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHXFlyer11 (Post 9131529)
That is true, however I think there is a way to do it. They didn't get it right the first time, but I by no means think that means that streaming isn't the way to go. They need to try a different formula: rent price point, buy price point, subscription price, what's included in subscription, etc. There's a formal they need to perfect based on consumer behavior. They'll figure it out.

There are a few examples I can think of:

1) Offer higher priced subscription that includes new releases in the cost
2) Offer a discount on new releases for those who purchase subscription

Was it really considered a "disappointment" however?

This was the only article I could find after a quick Google search. Mind you, this is dated Oct 1. I'm curious to see what the final figures are since they barely released it to the "base" subscription a week ago today.

https://www.tvisioninsights.com/reso...success_disney


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