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northbay Jan 28, 2011 5:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fflint (Post 5140493)
Actually they're just copying the several-mile long bike/ped trail under the BART elevated rails running through Berkeley, Albany, El Cerrito and Richmond--the Ohlone Greenway.

image http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2726/...93778c10_z.jpg by pbo31 at flickr

yeah yeah, i was just joking :D . thanks for the pic and the link. i think it's exciting that we're starting to create "bicycle freeways" all across the bay area. i think we all agree our next priority should be a path across the western span of the bay bridge. http://www.donaldmacdonaldarchitects...OBB_west1.html

fflint Jan 28, 2011 10:56 PM

^I was biking in the Oakland hills the other day with some friends and lamented that I had to leave in order to catch one of the last BART trains back. We were all talking about how we wish there were a way to bike across the Bay. There is definite interest among cyclists on both shores.

M II A II R II K Jan 31, 2011 9:34 PM

New San Francisco Bike Lanes Too Dangerous to Use


January 27, 2011

By Scott James

http://media.baycitizen.org/images/layout/logo4.png

Read More: http://www.baycitizen.org/columns/sc...lanes-too-use/

Quote:

Devoted cyclists like to brag that they will bike anywhere in San Francisco, regardless of daunting hills and traffic. But there is one place you will not find cyclists: on two bike lanes created by the city’s Municipal Transportation Agency. Most bike riders believe the lanes are just too dangerous. They are called “sharrow” lanes: white bicycle-shaped graphics with directional arrows painted onto street pavement that instruct cyclists where to share the road with other vehicles. On two main thoroughfares in and out of downtown — Post and Sutter Streets between Van Ness Avenue and Union Square — the transportation agency has placed these lanes in the middle of busy, one-way streets.

This puts cyclists in the center lane of three, surrounded by fast cars on all sides. Cyclists tend to use one word to describe this idea: Crazy. Joshua Citrak, an avid cyclist with 10 years’ experience on San Francisco streets, pedaled the route at the request of The Bay Citizen. An aggravated taxi driver who wanted to pass nearly hit Citrak, while other drivers tailgated and honked their horns. “I would never ride in that lane again,” Citrak said, rattled. “I did not feel safe.” He is not alone. On a recent weekday morning during rush hour, from 8:30 a.m. to 9 a.m., a total of 37 cyclists were seen riding on Post from Van Ness toward downtown. Not one used the bike lane.

Instead, 35 cyclists stayed to the far right side of the road, which is normally where bike lanes are placed, but which on this street is reserved for buses and taxis. Two cyclists opted to ride in the left lane, which is intended for automobiles. Most cyclists take other routes into downtown rather than navigate this precarious stretch. “Generally speaking, people are avoiding these streets,” said Casey Allen, who served on the committee that developed the city’s bike plan, part of the Transit-First policy, which mandates improving alternative forms of transportation.

Executing the bike plan is the responsibility of the transportation agency, which installed the sharrow lanes last June. “We are aware of the safety concerns,” said Paul Rose, the agency spokesman. He said state law prevented putting the bike lane on the right side of the street because “it’s a full-time transit-only lane.” The situation is emblematic of the challenges the city faces in fulfilling its bike plan — this is not its first bump. Courts suspended much of the plan for four years until last August while a study was done to assess the impact on traffic.

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Video Link

fflint Feb 1, 2011 12:32 AM

^That headline is wrong. Those are not bike lanes, even by San Francisco's rather lax standards.

M II A II R II K Feb 25, 2011 10:51 PM

Lowenthal Introduces Senate Bill That Could Become Three Foot Passing Law


February 23, 2011

By Damien Newton

Read More: http://la.streetsblog.org/2011/02/23...t-passing-law/

Quote:

Last week, Senator Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach) introduced S.B. 910, which seeks to define what a “safe distance” is for a motorist to pass a cyclist. While the language of the bill may seem innocuous at first read, Lowenthal’s staff says the current draft of the bill is a placeholder for what will most likely become a “3-Feet Passing Law.”

Given the trouble some “safe streets” legislation has faced in Sacramento, the passage of a 3 Feet Passing Law might seem a difficult task. In 2006, a similar law died in committee after an intense lobbying efforts by the California Highway Patrol and the trucking industry. The CHP’s opposition came in the form of “expert testimony” as it did when they all-but-killed legislation in 2009 that would have helped reduce speed limits on local streets.

But S.B. 910 should have some powerful local backers. “Give Me 3″ posters still adorn bus stops around Los Angeles, part of the public service poster contest hosted last year by the LAPD, Mayor’s Office, LACBC and Midnight Ridazz. At the press conference announcing the poster design, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa said of a 3-Feet Passing Law, “We’ll keep at it until it becomes part of the California Vehicle Code.”

Despite some high profile support, S.B. 910 isn’t quite ready to go through the hearing process. A close reading of the current draft of the legislation will show that the words “3 feet” don’t appear anywhere in the text. John Casey, the Chief of Staff for Senator Lowenthal and a bike commuter himself, explains that the Senator’s intent is to work with bicycle advocacy groups and law enforcement to make sure that the final draft is a bill that will work for cyclists, and motorists throughout California. Sixteen other states have laws that require motorists to give a three foot berth when passing a cyclist.

“We want to start looking at those states and see what works and what doesn’t so we can craft the tightest law we can for California,” explains Casey. The introduction of this legislation is seen as a key moment by some in the bicycle community. “Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition (LACBC) is pleased that Senator Lowenthal is sponsoring this bill.” explains Alexis Lantz, LACBC’s policy director, “He’s the ideal person to carry this bill forward, especially since he represents Long Beach, which we all know is trying to become the most bicycle friendly city in America. LACBC has been working with the California Bicycle Coalition (CBC) and the Mayor’s office on seeing this bill move forward.”

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M II A II R II K Mar 2, 2011 5:47 PM

Push for Bike Lanes Hits Some Bumps


Feb 2011

By Michael Mandelkern

http://www.gothamgazette.com/graphic...thead_logo.gif

Read More: http://www.gothamgazette.com/article...110225/16/3472

Quote:

Mayor Michael Bloomberg and the Department of Transportation have made a strong push for expanding bike lanes throughout New York City, but as more streets boast a special area for cyclists, a backlash has emerged. While opponents have long tried to block plans for specific lanes, now critics are taking on the program as a whole. Some community boards and politicians express concern that the lanes have been developed too quickly and say they make it harder to walk and drive around the city and can pose a safety hazard and hurt businesses. They attack the administration for what they see an anti-car bias. A numbers of these critics have mounted efforts on a variety of fronts to try to slow down the Bloomberg administration's cycling plans.

To dramatize his increasing skepticism about bike lanes, Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz rolled into his State of the Borough speech this year on a tricycle, and then blasted the city's cycling initiatives. "For the majority of New Yorkers, it is simply not feasible to make bicycles their primary mode of transport, and unfortunately that's the direction I believe the city's policy is heading," Markowitz said.

On a more serious note, the City Council last week unanimously passed bills requiring that the police update statistics on bicycle and pedestrian traffic violations and accidents, as well as those involving cars and trucks, and that the Department of Transportation keep track of bicycle crashes. Advocates for cycling endorsed these measures. The council also approved Intro 377, which will require the Department of Transportation explain to council members and community boards why it has rejected certain suggestions to ease traffic. These initiatives, however, seem unlikely to end the debate over bike lanes.

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http://www.gothamgazette.com/graphic...thelane_lg.jpg

M II A II R II K Mar 3, 2011 6:30 PM

What L.A.'s New Bike Plan Means For Cyclists—and the City


March 2, 2011

By Alissa Walker

Read More: http://www.good.is/post/what-l-a-s-n...-and-the-city/

Downloads: http://www.labikeplan.org/public_involvement/

Quote:

Despite Los Angeles' near-perfect weather, mostly-flat terrain, and an enthusiastic biking community, cyclists in L.A. still remain second-class citizens behind those piloting automobiles through the city. After yesterday's City Council ruling, that all could change. The 2010 Bike Plan, to be signed this morning, is perhaps the most ambitious pro-cyclist action in L.A. history, designating a 1,680-mile bikeway system and sweeping new bike-friendly policies.

The plan promises several changes for L.A. bikers: the Citywide Bikeway System will introduce three new interconnected bike path networks—Backbone (long crosstown routes on busy streets), Neighborhood (short connectors through small streets) and Green (along recreation areas)—throughout the city, a new pledge for Bicycle Friendly Streets will make streets more pleasant for riders and walkers, and a series of education programs and safety policies will help cars and cyclists co-exist.

Of course, this is just a plan, and one that's long overdue—for more on that, read last week's cover story in the LA Weekly. The real challenges may prove to be finding the proper funding to drive the plan towards implementation. That will take some massive commitment on behalf of the city. But what will these changes really mean for the average L.A. biker? And how does this help Los Angeles move towards a culture that truly values those on two-wheels? I asked several bike experts who have been working closely with the plan to help explain what a plan can do for biking in L.A.

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Rizzo Mar 3, 2011 6:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M II A II R II K (Post 5179174)
Lowenthal Introduces Senate Bill That Could Become Three Foot Passing Law


February 23, 2011

By Damien Newton

Read More: http://la.streetsblog.org/2011/02/23...t-passing-law/





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Everywhere I've been people have been pretty good about giving more than 3 feet. Sometimes an entire lane. Some of the smaller downtown blocks in Chicago where you have to stop at every intersection, traffic goes ridiculously slow, and the streets are pretty narrow. I'm usually fine with 12-14 inches, but no less. Any closer, and it might startle me a bit. I know some crazy cyclists who will keep their cool and accept 6 inches of clearance, but they like to take risks.

fflint Mar 4, 2011 12:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hayward (Post 5186085)
Everywhere I've been people have been pretty good about giving more than 3 feet. Sometimes an entire lane. Some of the smaller downtown blocks in Chicago where you have to stop at every intersection, traffic goes ridiculously slow, and the streets are pretty narrow. I'm usually fine with 12-14 inches, but no less. Any closer, and it might startle me a bit. I know some crazy cyclists who will keep their cool and accept 6 inches of clearance, but they like to take risks.

It is impossible to get three feet clearance on a Market Street commute. The vast, vast majority of cycle commuters here will ride around stopped buses (not loading or unloading, just stuck behind cars) in a strip about two feet wide between the bus and the curb. It's especially tricky because of the potholes. I often get six inches' clearance or less from moving vehicles as well, but they're moving slowly and if I need to I can lean up against the vehicle in order to avoid going down on trolley tracks or whatnot. Car-hugging!

M II A II R II K Mar 4, 2011 4:35 PM

:previous:

Why not take the parallel side streets or alley ways for those clogged up parts of the street...

pdxtex Mar 5, 2011 1:36 AM

ive never had a really good grasp as to what commuting in SF looks like. it seems daunting given the topography, street car tracks and super fast drivers. courage probably helps.

fflint Mar 5, 2011 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pdxtex (Post 5187966)
ive never had a really good grasp as to what commuting in SF looks like. it seems daunting given the topography, street car tracks and super fast drivers. courage probably helps.

All but two blocks of my daily 5-mile bike commute is on Market Street. Here's a YouTube video of Mid-Market that gives you some idea of what it's like to ride around the central city--lots of moving parts, plus subway grates and trolley tracks in the roadway:

Video Link

SHiRO Mar 6, 2011 12:07 AM

Video Link

Godwindaniel Mar 8, 2011 12:55 PM

Yah, Of course bicycle is an transportation device. In the olden days, people used only bicycles for their transportations. Increase in population, people started using two wheelers, cars, trucks etc., Because of that atmosphere spoiled, by using bicycles, we can control the pollution. So i can prefer bicycle and suggest for everyone to use .

__________________________________________
gps tracking | gps fleet tracking

lawfin Mar 10, 2011 12:38 AM

I have to thank Paul Krugman for pointing out this blog post.

Battle of the Bike Lanes
Posted by John Cassidy
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blog...s-schumer.html

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blog...#ixzz1G9WcaeSH


At the risk of incurring the wrath of the bicycle lobby, a constituency that pursues its agenda with about as much modesty and humor as the Jacobins pursued theirs, and which has found its heroine in transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan, I say hats off to Iris Weinshall, the former transportation commissioner (and wife of Senator Chuck Schumer), who, together with some like-minded citizens, has filed a lawsuit challenging a bike lane on Prospect Park West.

Tuesday’s Times said the lawsuit, which was filed Monday in State Supreme Court, calls on the city to remove the controversial green tarmac, citing a state law that allows citizens to challenge arbitrary and unfair actions by the government. The lawsuit concerns just one stretch of road. If successful, however, it could open the way to a broader challenge to City Hall, which sometimes seems intent on turning New York into Amsterdam, or perhaps Beijing.

I don’t have anything against bikes. As a student, I lived in the middle of Oxford, where cycling is the predominant mode of transport, and I cycled everywhere. Twenty-five years ago, when I moved to the East Village, I paid a guy on Second Avenue thirty dollars for a second-hand racing bike (probably stolen). Of a Sunday afternoon, hungover from the previous night’s carousing at neighborhood bars and clubs, I would pedal furiously up First Avenue, cross over to Park or Madison, continue up to Central Park and then race back down Fifth, all the way to Washington Square. In those days, there were few cyclists on the roads, and part of the thrill was avoiding cabs and other vehicles that would suddenly swing into your lane, apparently oblivious to your presence. When I got back to my apartment on East 12th Street, I was sometimes shaking.

Read more http://www.newyorker.com/online/blog...#ixzz1G9VlOJak

M II A II R II K Mar 11, 2011 7:49 PM

Floating parking and bike lanes




tallboy66 Mar 11, 2011 8:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fflint (Post 5186548)
It is impossible to get three feet clearance on a Market Street commute. The vast, vast majority of cycle commuters here will ride around stopped buses (not loading or unloading, just stuck behind cars) in a strip about two feet wide between the bus and the curb. It's especially tricky because of the potholes. I often get six inches' clearance or less from moving vehicles as well, but they're moving slowly and if I need to I can lean up against the vehicle in order to avoid going down on trolley tracks or whatnot. Car-hugging!

It's difficult to get any clearance sometimes especially when drivers do dumb things like try to turn the bike lane into another lane, turn one lane bridges into 2 lanes even if it's 2 before and after it's just not wide enough.

I've hit mirrors passing, been squeezed into curbs :shrug:

CityKid Mar 11, 2011 9:29 PM

I posted this in the local forum but figured no one interested in bicycle related news outside of Long Beach would see it otherwise. Long Beach is finishing up its separated bike lanes downtown, which would be the first of its kind in Southern California. They have removed one lane of traffic on Broadway and Third Streets in between Golden and Alamitos and have replaced it with a separated bicycle lane. These images are from the Press Telegram and GOOD.

http://pre.cloudfront.goodinc.com/po...48cc-640wi.jpg

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/liv...5-BIK1_500.jpg

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/liv..._PN05-BIK2.jpg

I can't figure out how to embed the video, but here is a clip taken by Charlie Gandy, the mobility coordinator spearheading the growth of bicycle infrastructure in Long Beach, while riding the new lanes.

northbay Mar 11, 2011 10:12 PM

^ good to see a physical barrier instead of just pylons or paint. don't mind that they removed a lane of auto either.

good job long beach. any plans for future expansions?

SHiRO Mar 11, 2011 10:47 PM

More Amsterdam biking. Watch the end for a bike parking.
Video Link


Biking in snow and mud.
Video Link


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