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-   -   NEW YORK | 111 W 57th St | 1,428 FT | 85 FLOORS (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=198228)

NYguy Jan 21, 2015 1:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JustSomeGuyWho (Post 6880373)
I don't know, the fatality statistic is pretty meaningless unless there is context around what percentage of construction jobs are union and what type of jobs these are. For example, I think it is safe to assume that the percentage of these fatalities related to road-work is pretty high. If 75% of the road-work jobs nationally are non-union and they account for 75% of the national fatalities on road-work jobs then there is no difference between union and non-union. Not really debating the safety of union vs non-union ... just railing against the use of meaningless or misleading statistics to support an argument.

I don't think it's meaningless at all. We have statistics for a reason. Of course, you can debate them til the end of time, but it doesn't matter.



Anyway, the latest permit filing...


http://a810-bisweb.nyc.gov/bisweb/Jo...ssdocnumber=01

Quote:

01/20/2015

PROPOSED EQUIPMENT USE OF SPIDER HOIST AS PER PLANS.

NYguy Jan 27, 2015 3:48 PM

Nothing new here, but JDS now has these teasers on the website...


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957540/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957542/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957543/original.jpg



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957541/original.jpg



This building would be gorgeous at any height...



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957544/original.jpg

yankeesfan1000 Jan 27, 2015 3:56 PM

Good lord...

NYguy Jan 27, 2015 4:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yankeesfan1000 (Post 6891329)
Good lord...


Yeah, this thing may overtake even the Tower Verre as my favorite new skyscraper, thought that hasn't happened yet. It's a battle of renders, but this one takes us back to Woolworth days
(where this building is being fine tuned btw).



http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/14353476.jpg
http://www.panoramio.com/photo/14353476


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158957543/original.jpg

nyc_alex Jan 27, 2015 4:38 PM

I'm really drooling over thinking what these condos will be like, especially the penthouse.

1) I like how the sides are more solid with the front and back as walls of glass. That means the living/dining rooms will have those gorgeous unobstructed views while the bedrooms will likely have a more private and secure feeling.

2) The setbacks towards the top mean some nice outdoor spaces

3) Thin design means multi-floor units which is awesome - better separation of bedrooms from living/dining areas.

Skyguy_7 Jan 27, 2015 4:40 PM

^I cannot wait to look up at that facade in real life. The ornament is unlike anything on earth right now.

mistermetAJ Jan 27, 2015 5:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 6891337)
Yeah, this thing may overtake even the Tower Verre as my favorite new skyscraper, thought that hasn't happened yet. It's a battle of renders, but this one takes us back to Woolworth days
(where this building is being fine tuned btw).

Crown, ornamentation, setback, quality materials, renovated landmark as the base and thin. It respects the rich architectural history of the city while carrying it on its shoulders into the 21st. Deco meets modern meets PoMo meets contextualism. Contemporary is not a good enough word to describe a building that evokes the romantic image of 20s-40s New York and the New York to come.

ShOP has developed a new class of architecture with this building called New York Architecture.

NYguy Jan 27, 2015 5:18 PM

I agree with everything everyone is saying. It's just a beauty. I wonder what they have planned for their Hudson Yards tower.


Image taken from

http://www.hauteresidence.com/skinny...t-57th-street/



http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158958086/original.jpg



http://jdsdevelopment.com/111-west-5...reet/#lightbox[group-8471]/3/


http://www.pbase.com/nyguy/image/158958126/original.jpg

jsr Jan 27, 2015 5:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nyc_alex (Post 6891405)
I'm really drooling over thinking what these condos will be like, especially the penthouse.

1) I like how the sides are more solid with the front and back as walls of glass.

Not really all that different from the shear wall arrangement that would you find on a typical hotel or apartment floorplan except that it is only a single unit in width extruded to dizzying heights.... and that those walls are up to three feet thick. :eek:

Design-mind Jan 27, 2015 7:50 PM

Wow very Art Nouveau! Classy!

BrandonJXN Jan 27, 2015 8:05 PM

Gorgeous. Straight out of 1920's New York City. Build it yesterday.

JayPro Jan 27, 2015 8:19 PM

Ah yes. dear fellows; but here's the nub in rhetorical questioner's form:

Has any other supertall appeared on the radar as it were out of sheer ether, sailed through the "approvals" process and started foundation work with such blinding speed?

This has to be NYC's most beautiful surprise addition since they pushed Lady Chrysler's spire up from the inside out.

NYC2ATX Jan 28, 2015 3:52 AM

This building is really going to be unlike anything we've ever seen before in Manhattan. An instant classic.

NYguy Jan 28, 2015 2:30 PM

Steinway Hall is already a landmark (both inside and out), but the new addition could be issued that status years down the line.



http://www.rew-online.com/2015/01/28...-to-the-skies/

What’s driving builders’ race to the skies?


JANUARY 28, 2015
By Konrad Putzier


Quote:

In Manhattan’s concrete canyons, daylight is becoming a rare commodity.

2014 saw the opening of the Western Hemisphere’s tallest office tower and the topping-out of its tallest residential tower. Soon, half a dozen residential skyscrapers around 57th Street will stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the Empire State building, until fairly recently, by far the city’s tallest building.

In the west side, a cluster of mixed-use towers is growing around the Hudson rail yards, while downtown is celebrating its revival with a few record-setting skyscrapers as well.

Amid all the construction, you would be hard-pressed to find a New Yorker who hasn’t noticed that buildings seem to be getting taller and taller.

The phenomenon is a global one. 2014 was the tallest year in the history of construction.

Worldwide, 97 buildings of more than 200 meters were completed, according to a report by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

One World Trade Center was the tallest of them all, rising above New York’s increasingly impressive skyline with a height of 1,776 feet.

Some have accepted this upward race as an inevitable part of human progress — like cars getting faster and computer chips getting smaller.

Conventional wisdom holds that developers will build as high as zoning and technology allow. And as the former tends to get relaxed more and more and the latter improves, there is only one direction: up.

But there is, in fact, little inevitability in the current skyscraper boom. The upward race is the result of a complex mix of factors that have more to do with cyclical forces than linear progress.

For each main category of new construction — condo, rental and commercial — the height calculation is different. Look more closely at how developers pick a building’s height, and you get a sense of why some towers get taller and taller – while others don’t.

It may seem like a foregone conclusion that developers in Manhattan will build as high as zoning and technology allow. After all, they paid a steep price for a parcel of land.

“Owners are looking to maximize returns,” said Richard Anderson, head of the New York Building Congress. “One way to do that is to construct the most floor space possible. If you have a fixed lot, the only way to increase floor space is to go up.”

Nonetheless, there is only a small subsector of Manhattan’s new development market where new buildings almost always rise as high as they possibly can: condo construction around Central Park’s southern fringe and in neighborhoods such as Tribeca and the Financial District. Rental and office developments, on the other hand, often don’t reach the maximal height allowed.

There are several factors explaining this difference. Construction costs rise disproportionately beyond a certain height, explained Ralph Esposito, president of Lend Lease Construction LMB. This means adding floors is often only profitable if buyers or renters are willing to pay a premium.

Esposito said it takes longer to get workers and building materials to higher floors, resulting in lost time and productivity. Moreover, the stronger winds on high floors often interrupt construction, as work is illegal if winds exceed 30 miles per hour.

“The winds when you get past 40 stories are a very different environment for us,” Esposito said, adding that he estimates high-rise developers on average lose about five days to wind. Needless to say, lost time is lost money, driving up construction costs.

For condo construction in the city’s most desirable locations, the premiums buyers are willing to pay for penthouses more than make up for higher construction costs. This means developers have an incentive to build as high as possible.

For example, the penthouse at Extell’s One57 just sold for $9,000 per s/f, well above the building average of $6,000.

Property Markets Group’s Kevin Maloney recently told Real Estate Weekly that demand for penthouses has prompted him to design his planned condo tower 111 West 57th Street as high as zoning allows — in this case 1,400 feet.

But for rental development, the calculation is radically different. High floors in rental buildings don’t typically achieve premiums similar to their condo peers, leaving construction beyond a certain height unprofitable.

“Height by itself isn’t necessarily a good thing because it adds costs,” argued Jon McMillan, director of planning at TF Cornerstone, a development firm specializing in rental projects. “You only need it if you want to go over someone else (to get views).”

McMillan explained that the firm rarely builds higher than 30 stories in New York City, the threshold at which added costs start outstripping marginal returns.

.....Office towers are a different case altogether. Top floors do generally command significantly higher rents in high profile towers, similar to condo buildings. But office developers face a unique obstacle to height: elevators.

“Because apartment buildings are so much less densely populated than offices, elevators don’t need to be constantly added for height,” argued Janno Lieber, president of WTC Properties at Silverstein Properties. “That’s why the growth in height has been more dramatic in residential units.”

Since elevators in office buildings tend to get used a lot, developers need to add more of them if they want to build beyond a certain height. But adding elevator shafts increases the building’s core, reducing rentable space throughout the building. Thus, paradoxically, building higher can actually reduce usable space and make a tower less profitable.

This helps explain why office developers often don’t build as high as zoning allows. For example, Massey Knakal recently marketed two parcels in the Hudson Yards district that would allow for an 1,800 foot tall office tower — the tallest in the Western Hemisphere. Tishman Speyer bought the parcels last April, but merely filed permits for 61 stories.

It is telling that those office towers that do rise to freakish heights often do so only with the help of generous tax breaks, or even subsidies, as the case of 1WTC shows.

To be fair, the development of denser forms of concrete and steel has made skyscraper construction easier, allowing the core structure to eat up less space. A super-skinny tower like 111 West 57th Street would not have been possible 80 years ago.

The same can be said of zoning and cheap credit. Rezoning campaigns have made high-rise construction possible in a number of new neighborhoods, while readily available loans offer the necessary financing. But just because developers can build higher doesn’t mean they will.

High land prices have often been fielded as another explanation for the skyscraper boom. However, that explanation works both ways. High land prices may encourage developers to build higher. But land prices are only high because developers are willing to spend top dollar, which they do because demand for high-rise units is strong.

In the end, it all boils down to demand – which has more to do with cyclical factors than with historical inevitability. Investors are snapping up luxury condos in part because other assets are seen as less safe and less profitable. Once the global economic climate changes, demand can easily dry up. Office construction is obviously tied to business cycles, and could well stop during the next downturn, as it did in 2009.

sparkling Feb 5, 2015 2:14 PM

Public Advocate Letitia James wades into union argument over Billionaires’ Row megatower

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Quote:

Public Advocate Letitia James is getting in the middle of one of the New York City construction unions' highest profile battles.

James, a longtime friend of the unions, has approached development giants JDS Development and Property Markets Group over their plan to build one of the city's tallest residential towers using non-union workers.

In a letter to the developers obtained by the Daily News and dated January 28, James carefully takes aim at the safety records of the non-union shops associated with the project and advises the project's principals, JDS' Michael Stern and PMG's Kevin Maloney, to look elsewhere for skilled workers. James steers clear of the words "union" and "non-union" but her meaning is clear.

"Given the immense height of the structure, its proportions, the challenging nature of the site and the densely populated nature of the surrounding blocks, I am concerned that any incident at the site could potentially cause outsized harm," she said. "I would urge you to consider an organized workforce that is adequately trained and fairly compensated."

If the project goes ahead as anticipated, the pencil-thin 80-story building, at 111 W. 57th St., which is slated to rise to 1,421 feet and be one of the priciest condos on "Billionaires' Row," would be one of the largest non-union construction projects to be completed in the history of the city.

The project is just the latest in a string of non-union jobs for Stern, who is also responsible for pricey condo projects such as Walker Tower at 212 W. 18th St.

Indeed, the battle between Stern and the unions has been bubbling up for quite some time. In December, more than 8,000 members of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York protested allegedly unsafe work conditions at his projects.

"This is irresponsible development in the city of New York, plain and simple," Gary LaBarbera, president of the trades council, told the Daily News. "He's going to put workers at risk and the people of New York in jeopardy."

Stern staunchly denied allegations of unsafe work conditions.

"We respect the Public Advocate's thoughts and comments on workplace safety, and we echo her belief that safety is of the utmost importance," his spokesperson said. "The ownership of this building has an established track record when it comes to successfully completing complex structures safely, and we will continue to strive to maintain that level of success."

A spokesperson for the Public Advocate did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

James was endorsed by several big unions, including the 15,000-member Mason Tenders District Council and the 24,000-member Teamsters Local 237, when she ran for Public Advocate in 2013.

Experts said the successful completion of the tower would send shockwaves through the construction industry and encourage other developers to build non-union, which is significantly more cost effective.

But LaBarbera said that was a moot point.

"This is very complex project in terms of architecture and design," he said. "There's no way he's going to pull it off."

NYguy Feb 5, 2015 2:28 PM

Quote:

In a letter to the developers obtained by the Daily News and dated January 28, James carefully takes aim at the safety records of the non-union shops associated with the project and advises the project's principals, JDS' Michael Stern and PMG's Kevin Maloney, to look elsewhere for skilled workers. James steers clear of the words "union" and "non-union" but her meaning is clear.

"Given the immense height of the structure, its proportions, the challenging nature of the site and the densely populated nature of the surrounding blocks, I am concerned that any incident at the site could potentially cause outsized harm," she said. "I would urge you to consider an organized workforce that is adequately trained and fairly compensated."


I think it will end up being a mix. If there's an accident at the site, which seems likely either way, and Stern doesn't have the more skilled workforce, it could lead to some sort of regulations from the city.

NYguy Feb 13, 2015 6:38 PM

http://urbanismvsmodernism.blogspot.com/

Brandon Nagle


http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-p6_KBj7yuB...0/SAM_0725.JPG



http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-wTAeft-gkF...0/SAM_0724.JPG

Innsertnamehere Feb 15, 2015 5:02 PM

New York is going absolutely crazy.. I've been watching the development from afar, I'm going to have to make a trip down in 2018 or 2019 to see the changes.. (Last in NYC in 2013)

JR Ewing Feb 16, 2015 1:59 AM

Two icons!!!

http://jdsdevelopment.com/wp-content.../W57-axo-B.jpg

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...00c9e8adb3.jpg

chris08876 Feb 16, 2015 3:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere (Post 6916454)
New York is going absolutely crazy.. I've been watching the development from afar, I'm going to have to make a trip down in 2018 or 2019 to see the changes.. (Last in NYC in 2013)

Take a helicopter tour if you go around that time. Believe me, they are worth it. Its like $215 per person, but its probably the closest one will ever reach to a urban Nirvana. Best 20 minutes of your life. With all of the supertalls and growing downtown hubs in Brooklyn/Queens, I expect the tours to skyrocket in attendance. Plus, all of the developments near the Bronx and along the East River. :slob:


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