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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 12:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dl3000 (Post 4894783)
Oh, voice of reason, I was starting to miss you...

...NOT.

The library is one of the great American social inventions and is still relevant. I seriously doubt you have any civic pride or a concept of keeping adolescents out of trouble. Go get a cabin in South Dakota.

What's the point of having a city funded warehouse for books when we have the Kindle, iPad and other similar devices that can download just about any book you can think of in seconds?

True, they're not perfect - yet, but give them some time. In a few years, we'll probably have services that do for books what NetFlix does for movies. All the ebooks, magazines, etc. you can read for one small monthly fee, yours to enjoy anywhere you want on a device that will probably cost less than $50.

Will you still want to go to the library?

What about the poor? A few hours of collecting cans will pay for all the reading they could possibly want.

Crackertastik Jul 28, 2010 2:08 AM

A library is not simply a collection of books. Open your eyes.

Also ask yourself this. What is the point of a museum when you can go on the internet and look at Monet all day long. Or travelling to other places when you can go on the internet and look at pictures? There is something to be said about the setting and physicality of enjoying something. Libraries are just as functional and necessary to enjoying the written language as a museum is to art or as travelling is to seeing the world.

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 2:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crackertastik (Post 4927104)
A library is not simply a collection of books. Open your eyes.

Also ask yourself this. What is the point of a museum when you can go on the internet and look at Monet all day long. Or travelling to other places when you can go on the internet and look at pictures? There is something to be said about the setting and physicality of enjoying something. Libraries are just as functional and necessary to enjoying the written language as a museum is to art or as travelling is to seeing the world.

A book is a book, whether it's electronic or in print.

A painting has to be experienced in person. You won't get the same thing at home.

Of course, there are other reasons to go to the library, but for the average person who just wants to check out a book, why bother when you can do it with your own portable device?

The need for socialization will still exist long after printed books no longer exist. Maybe the city should build a museum or planetarium instead?

OneMetropolis Jul 28, 2010 3:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4927110)
A book is a book, whether it's electronic or in print.

A painting has to be experienced in person. You won't get the same thing at home.

Of course, there are other reasons to go to the library, but for the average person who just wants to check out a book, why bother when you can do it with your own portable device?

The need for socialization will still exist long after printed books no longer exist. Maybe the city should build a museum or planetarium instead?


Wow, your ideals about written text remind me of a book I read called "Fahrenheit 451". I sure hope that dosen't tanspire.

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 4:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OneMetropolis (Post 4927183)
Wow, your ideals about written text remind me of a book I read called "Fahrenheit 451". I sure hope that dosen't tanspire.


Wasn't that about the government burning books?

I believe at some point in the future, books will make the jump from the printed page to some download format (PDF?). We've gone from clay tablets to papyrus to Gutenberg's press. This is just the next step. When will it happen? Maybe the next couple decades?

voice of reason Jul 28, 2010 5:05 AM

Maybe the city should fix the roads or pay its bills instead of building the library?

It does have one of the lowest credit ratings in one of the states with one of the lowest credit ratings in a country that just had its credit rating lowered because of out-of-control spending.

Spend Away!

eburress Jul 28, 2010 5:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4927110)
A book is a book, whether it's electronic or in print.

A painting has to be experienced in person. You won't get the same thing at home.

Of course, there are other reasons to go to the library, but for the average person who just wants to check out a book, why bother when you can do it with your own portable device?

The need for socialization will still exist long after printed books no longer exist. Maybe the city should build a museum or planetarium instead?

Beyond that, books are printed by the thousands. There is only one of Monet's "Weeping Willow."

sw5710 Jul 28, 2010 5:49 AM

Does San Diego have a 500 foot limit for all buildings?

Derek Jul 28, 2010 7:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sw5710 (Post 4927289)
Does San Diego have a 500 foot limit for all buildings?



Yes.



Characters. <------Added to make my post 10 characters. :P

brantw Jul 28, 2010 4:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sw5710 (Post 4927289)
Does San Diego have a 500 foot limit for all buildings?

Please don't remind us.

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 5:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brantw (Post 4927651)
Please don't remind us.

Does anyone know why they have this limit? Have there ever been any attempts to lift it?

staplesla Jul 28, 2010 5:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4927726)
Does anyone know why they have this limit? Have there ever been any attempts to lift it?

FAA ruling due to Lindbergh field being so close.

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 5:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by staplesla (Post 4927740)
FAA ruling due to Lindbergh field being so close.

Is there any land between Orange County and San Diego that would be suitable for a large international airport? High speed rail could link this new airport to both regions and San Diego would be free to build whatever they want.

Derek Jul 28, 2010 6:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4927815)
Is there any land between Orange County and San Diego that would be suitable for a large international airport? High speed rail could link this new airport to both regions and San Diego would be free to build whatever they want.



Yes, but they're military bases.

Bootstrap Bill Jul 28, 2010 6:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Derek (Post 4927875)
Yes, but they're military bases.

The military has a lot of prime real estate here in Southern California. Why can't the government sell most of that land and move the bases inland? The money made from the sale would be substantial.

Do the Marines really need their own private beach?

wong21fr Jul 28, 2010 8:03 PM

^Well, considering one of the Marines' primary missions is to conduct amphibious assaults, then, yes, they do need a beach.

llamaorama Jul 28, 2010 10:50 PM

I think the in the future there may be "libraries", which won't have a terribly large number of paper books but will act as community centers with free public access to the internet, e-book readers, etc.

Cities won't really need large libraries nor extensive chains of local branches anymore, though, especially if there are other facilities like community or rec centers with space to absorb their functions. Perhaps cities should at least keep their grand old historic main library if they have one and downsize the actual library space while turning the rest into something else, in the vein of the cities that were wise enough to preserve their fabulous old train stations but did not delude themselves into thinking that a considerable people would continue to arrive by train at them and knew to turn them into something else.

The original goal of free access to information has not died out though. A person could for free "check out" an e-book but only access this otherwise paid content from the confines of the library, on the library's secure e-book reader device which would not allow piracy of the materials. Obviously most people would simply buy the content on their own device so this would not harm book publishers no more than lending a small number of dead tree copies of their materials does now.

Generally a service to children and the poor, but there are always times when ordinary people might need to look up a technical manual or academic journals which you don't want to go out and buy.

OneMetropolis Jul 29, 2010 2:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bootstrap Bill (Post 4927229)
Wasn't that about the government burning books?

I believe at some point in the future, books will make the jump from the printed page to some download format (PDF?). We've gone from clay tablets to papyrus to Gutenberg's press. This is just the next step. When will it happen? Maybe the next couple decades?


Yeah, basically same concept, but yeah. A new central library for this city is a dream come true.:banana:

OneMetropolis Jul 29, 2010 2:26 AM

Quote:


New Central Library Breaks Ground
http://media.signonsandiego.com/img/...c82dae770b93ac

http://www.sandiego.gov/public-libra.../newmain3a.jpg
Howard Lipin pv["p.a_4"] = "Howard Lipin";
John McAllister, president of The Friends of the San Diego Public Library looks at a model of the library before the start of the groundbreaking ceremony in East Village.




DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO — In a flutter of confetti, the new downtown library got under way Wednesday, even as supporters mapped plans to raise the final millions to bring the long-delayed project to fruition in three years.
“This library will benefit generations of San Diegans to come,” said Mayor Jerry Sanders, who acknowledged previous mayors, library commissioners and major donors in attendance at the ceremonial groundbreaking.
The nine-story, $185 million building at Park Boulevard and J Street will replace the current Central Library, which opened in 1954 at Eighth Avenue and E Street. The new building, with 491,000 square feet, will have dedicated parking and a signature, open-air dome by project architect Rob Quigley.
Financing is coming from downtown redevelopment property taxes, state bond funds, private donors and the San Diego Unified School District. The district will cover costs of a planned two-story charter high school within the library.
So far, the San Diego Public Library Foundation has raised $40.8 million, including $10 million for operations, with $20 million pledged by Qualcomm Inc. founder Irwin Jacobs and his wife Joan. Another $32.5 million is needed by January 2012 to complete the project.
Foundation officials said they were confident they could meet the deadline now that construction is beginning.
City officials said general contractor Turner Construction Co. will begin actual construction next week with completion projected for mid-2013.
Article Site:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2...d-new-library/

so what will become of that derelict building that used to be the Central Library.

HurricaneHugo Jul 29, 2010 4:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sw5710 (Post 4927289)
Does San Diego have a 500 foot limit for all buildings?

:tantrum: :tantrum: :tantrum: :tantrum: :tantrum: :tantrum:

10 char


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