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-   -   What two cities do you find most similar in nearly every respect? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=240041)

Steely Dan Aug 19, 2019 7:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suburbanite (Post 8662812)
Chicago is one of the most centralized cities in terms of high-rise location. Tall buildings are tightly grouped within the core, and finding 20+ stories outside of that area is a rarity.

true, with the exception of along lakefront.

this is edgewater, ~7 miles north of downtown chicago.

downtown evanston, one of the few highrise clusters of note in suburban chicagoland, is at the top right.

https://i.yochicago.com/images/hpmai...?preset=yofull
source: http://yochicago.com/edgewater-apart...e-foods/58755/

glowrock Aug 19, 2019 7:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jd3189 (Post 8662760)
Yeah, all those river valley cities.

Definitely not all of them. Gotta have the steep topography, preferably an incline or two, bridges, tunnels, etc... etc... Chattanooga is the closest analogue to Pittsburgh, actually. Cincinnati is close, but not quite the same topography.

Aaron (Glowrock)

Obadno Aug 19, 2019 7:50 PM

Las Vegas is like Phoenix’s half sister that grew up in a rougher part of town.

Smaller, dirty, a bit tougher. The desert around Vegas is more desolate and bleak, Phoenix lacks the edge that comes from the types of industry like gambling and ...well let’s be frank... prostitution.

Tucson and ABQ are quite similar in how the look and feel. Tucson has generally held onto its “southwestern” vibe, where Phoenix and Vegas became Californized a few decades back. ABQ has a cooler climate but they are more alike each other than Tucson is to Phoenix.

Boisebro Aug 19, 2019 7:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8662829)
true, with the exception of along lakefront.

this is edgewater, ~7 miles north of downtown chicago.

downtown evanston, one of the few highrise clusters of note in suburban chicagoland, is at the top right.

https://i.yochicago.com/images/hpmai...?preset=yofull
source: http://yochicago.com/edgewater-apart...e-foods/58755/


you can almost see Milwaukee from that shot.

which, back on topic, is like Chicago's little brother. Chicago's smarter, way sexier, far more drunk little brother.

:D

Buckeye Native 001 Aug 19, 2019 7:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glowrock (Post 8662852)
Definitely not all of them. Gotta have the steep topography, preferably an incline or two, bridges, tunnels, etc... etc... Chattanooga is the closest analogue to Pittsburgh, actually. Cincinnati is close, but not quite the same topography.

Aaron (Glowrock)

That's why I hesitate to say St. Louis is similar, but I'm not at all familiar with that city's topography, at least compared to Cincinnati and Pittsburgh.

To me, Squirrel Hill and Hyde Park are nearly identical and Clifton and Oakland share similarities as well, although I'm not sure if there's a Cincinnati equivalent to Mexican War Streets (someone else with more familiarity with the two might be able to help?)

JAYNYC Aug 19, 2019 8:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Boisebro (Post 8662867)
you can almost see Milwaukee from that shot.

which, back on topic, is like Chicago's little brother. Chicago's smarter, way sexier, far more drunk little brother.

:D

I've visited Milwaukee several times. Have never come close to observing anything / anyone remotely "smart" or "sexy" while there.

softee Aug 19, 2019 8:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8662826)
They look quite different, obviously. Bloor looks very different from N. Milwaukee. And you're aren't comparing apples-apples, you're comparing the hipster center of Chicago with an immigrant neighborhood in Toronto.

Bloor and Ossington is pretty hipsterized now, although it still does have lots of immigrants living in the area, but that's true for most of Toronto.

suburbanite Aug 19, 2019 8:38 PM

Chicago and Milwaukee are about as similar as you can get, but they also represent the problem with the question at hand. Unless two cities grew up literally right next to each other at the same time, with similar geographies, demographics, etc. It's quite difficult to draw anything past superficial comparisons between the two.

Denver and Calgary probably get my vote for cities with real geographic and political separation between them. Modern skylines at the border of The Great Plains and Rockies. A history of ranching turned hotspot for young people looking for jobs and an active outdoors lifestyle. Big energy centers transitioning to a more diverse economy. Both in close proximity to some of the best skiing in the world despite being over 1,000 km apart. Both cities like their football and hockey, although the Nuggets are probably a bigger draw in Denver now.

I think 8th Ave in Calgary and the 16th Street Mall in Denver are better comparisons than any of the Toronto or Chicago ones seen so far.

8th ave:

https://www.google.com/maps/@51.0456...2!8i6656?hl=en

16th street:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7451...7i13312!8i6656

LA21st Aug 19, 2019 8:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8662776)
Read my previous post. No one said that Yonge is a typical Toronto street. And, you're right, it's quite similar to Wilshire, which is the point.

Yonge obviously isn't a typical Toronto street, but it's the archetypal main commercial street through the favored quarter. It runs right through the wealthiest areas in Toronto (and maybe Canada?).

If you look at Bloor, or Queen West, you'll see the same differences (generally narrower streets, newer buildings, lots of concrete and glass, a bit shabby/messy). What neighborhood Chicago street looks like Bloor or Queen West?

And if you compare residential streets, you'll see distinct typologies. Chicago has grander, wider blocks, far more historic streetscapes, Toronto has tons of much more modest semi-row blocks that kinda look UK-ish, and the rich streetcar suburbs start immediately north of downtown. It's like if you could stroll from Wilmette to North Michigan Ave.

You said Younge is a TYPICAL URBAN CORRIDOR in the FAVORED QUARTER earlier. It's not. If that were true, there would be many Younge streets, no?
If you said here is a typical stretch of YOUNGE in the favored quarter, that would make more sense.

Do you want to keep posting one block pictures off Google maps, or should show someone show you an aerial of Toronto?

iheartthed Aug 19, 2019 9:00 PM

Detroit and Flint

dc_denizen Aug 19, 2019 9:46 PM

Los Angeles and Toronto, with some small differences.

The density in la is due to midrises and low-rises covering a vast area, vs Toronto towers in the park

Otherwise the gridded suburbs and large industrial areas look remarkably similar.

Both have long commercial corridors

Toronto has more condos in the core

The low rise built environment in both cities more single family homes, compared to Chicago which is more small apartments.

dc_denizen Aug 19, 2019 9:51 PM

Houston is like Los Angeles but without the walkable commercial corridors.

Dallas and Phoenix are very master planned cities, even in the core. Lots of strip nodes at the confluence of gridded arterials. Two outliers in my view. Even Houston and Atlanta are messier and more organic, thankfully.

Atlanta, Charlotte, and Raleigh are all variations on the same theme. Good downtown surrounded by sprawl

Flint and Detroit —very similar, good downtown surrounded by blight.

Oklahoma City and Tulsa are at one of a midwestern urban spectrum with Minneapolis and Columbus in the other. One one end dusty parking lots interspersed with monumental architecture and drive in fast food, on the other infill and vibrancy and high real estate values

Chicago and Milwaukee obviously

St. Louis, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh are brothers

SFBruin Aug 19, 2019 9:57 PM

I was going to say, that image of the Toronto Street:

https://www.google.ca/maps/@43.66128...7i16384!8i8192

Kinda looks like a double-decker version of Melrose in LA:

https://www.google.com/maps/@34.0836...7i13312!8i6656

homebucket Aug 19, 2019 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ocman (Post 8662534)
South Bay and Orange County are exactly the same. Sunnyvale is basically an Indian-American dominated version of Irvine.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8662549)
OC is a lot whiter, beachier and more conservative, and the ethnic mix is somewhat different. And obviously the respective economic bases are totally different.

Depends where in the OC. There's a big difference between North/Central OC and South/Coastal OC. North OC is much more ethnically diverse. Likewise, the Santa Clara County has large white and more conservative populations too. I don't know the exact numbers and how it compares to the OC, but they're there in places like Los Gatos, Saratoga, Los Altos, and Palo Alto. Santa Clara County was mostly Republican until 1988, and the OC has just recently become Democratic in 2018.

The South Bay and OC are also similar in that they have large immigrant Vietnamese populations. And while the OC is more dense, they're both still very sprawly and suburban environments, with lots of freeways. Income is probably where the greatest disparity is seen, as the median household income in Santa Clara County is $111,069 vs $81,851 in the OC. Interestingly, you wouldn't be able to tell though as the OC appears just as, if not more affluent visually.

Vietnamese population as of 2016:
San Jose - 106,992
Milpitas - 11,165
Total - 118,157
Santa Clara County Total - 125,695 (7.1%)

Garden Grove - 52,894
Westminster - 36,689
Santa Ana - 24,702
Anaheim - 17,896
Fountain Valley - 11,561
Total - 143,742
Orange County Total - 183,766 (6.1%)

kool maudit Aug 19, 2019 10:35 PM

St. Clair in Toronto can feel a lot like Wilshire... actually, LA kind of works for north-of-Bloor TO at least. The old city is more of a Pittsburgh/Outer London/Shanghai thing right about now. It's kind of sui generis.

Boisebro Aug 19, 2019 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JAYNYC (Post 8662894)
I've visited Milwaukee several times. Have never come close to observing anything / anyone remotely "smart" or "sexy" while there.


my god, man! that's like visiting Key West and never seeing water!

:sly:

Cory Aug 19, 2019 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 8663032)
Depends where in the OC. There's a big difference between North/Central OC and South/Coastal OC. North OC is much more ethnically diverse. Likewise, the Santa Clara County has large white and more conservative populations too. I don't know the exact numbers and how it compares to the OC, but they're there in places like Los Gatos, Saratoga, Los Altos, and Palo Alto. Santa Clara County was mostly Republican until 1988, and the OC has just recently become Democratic in 2018.

Those areas are quite white in the South Bay but the Bay Area is one of the most liberal regions in the country. Cities like Palo Alto vote around 3/4 Democrat in national elections and those surrounding cities are not too far off.

Centropolis Aug 19, 2019 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 (Post 8662872)
That's why I hesitate to say St. Louis is similar, but I'm not at all familiar with that city's topography, at least compared to Cincinnati and Pittsburgh.

To me, Squirrel Hill and Hyde Park are nearly identical and Clifton and Oakland share similarities as well, although I'm not sure if there's a Cincinnati equivalent to Mexican War Streets (someone else with more familiarity with the two might be able to help?)

i can fuck around with the mixture all day but st. louis isn't entirely dissimilar from cincinnati (which definitely has the deep river city thing down) if it were built on rolling topography instead of a steeply dissected valley...and with a good smoking detroit kick in the ass both good and bad. it has a swath of older (rail served) suburbs that look a lot like metro cleveland mixed with suburban dc...sort of throws things off..

RCDC Aug 19, 2019 11:17 PM

Well I stick to something easy and say Baltimore, Wilmington and Philadelphia (and Camden). Central core surrounded by seemingly endless grid of unassuming, repetitive townhouse blocks, big presence of heavy industry and shipping. One may be able to find scenes somewhat like this in other cities but not a preponderance of them.

https://i.imgur.com/vIQtTgM.jpg

RockMont Aug 19, 2019 11:18 PM

Billings---Bismarck
Casper---Cheyenne
Boise---Spokane
Minneapolis/St.Paul---Dallas/Ft. Worth
Kansas City---St. Louis
Wichita---Omaha
Fargo---Sioux Falls


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