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-   -   What two cities do you find most similar in nearly every respect? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=240041)

Quixote Aug 31, 2019 9:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kool maudit (Post 8674672)
London and LA correspond in the sense that, upon becoming great cities, they both launched new models of urban form characterized by lower density. But in reality, London is Big Boston.

Agreed. Boston's outer neighborhoods have British design/form written all over it (it is New England, after all). But that's a dead obvious parallel, which is less interesting to talk about.

The LA/London comparison is even less pronounced than LA/Detroit, yet there are still many analogies that can be made. London has a distinct multi-nodal, urban-suburban hybrid model across a vast geographic expanse*, and both cities are defined more as urban agglomerations (Greater London, Los Angeles County). Central London (not the same as Inner London) is tiny in relation to Greater London, and there's a huge discrepancy in commercial activity/intensity between the two that isn't commensurate with the drop in built-form density.

*LA County is 4,058 square miles of land, but only about 30% isn't uninhabitable or sparsely populated. So that's about 10.1 million people across 1,200 square miles, for a density of roughly 8,500. By developed world standards (minus Japan), that's a pretty high level of density to sustain over such a large area. That Greater London has a density of over 14,000 despite thousands of acres dedicated to natural preserves, golf courses, and agricultural fields is highly impressive as well.

Sun Belt Aug 31, 2019 10:03 PM

^ Then there is Detroit.........

Quixote Aug 31, 2019 10:09 PM

LA's a mixture of the following (in no particular order):

Detroit
Toronto
Chicago
Houston
Beijing
Bay Area
Queens, NY
Greater London
Mexico City
Tokyo/Seoul

Ironically, I don't think it has much in common with San Diego in terms of function or built environment. It's similar to southern OC, but that's not representative of LA at all.

JManc Aug 31, 2019 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LA21st (Post 8673614)
Houston and LA comparisons will never make sense, unless you're just talking the newer downtown skylines. I don't see anything in Houston that looks like LA neighborhoods, and when people post google maps, it just makes less similar. I don't see this changing in 30-50 years, because Houston (or any Sunbelt city) doesn't have the prewar commerical streets/neighborhoods LA has. Nothing wrong with that, just makes little sense.


Houston resembles Orange County more than LA.

Superficially i see a resemblance based on living in Houston and having visited Southern California half dozen or so times. Obviously the geographies and topologies are very different not too mention Houston is roughly a third the size of LA but the freeways, sprawl, multi-nodal, certain neighborhoods, reliance on cars and other factors that lend many to see the similarities.

Sun Belt Aug 31, 2019 10:34 PM

After much thought and reading this thread, I'm starting to get it gang.

If you ignore things like climate, population totals, population density, racial/ethnic demographics, income demographics, local history, mass media exposure, topography, the actual built environment that is evident in today's real world environment. . . etc ... etc.

Detroit and Los Angeles are the most similar in nearly every respect.

The new Twin Cities, gang. Minneapolis, I'm sorry, it's time to give it up to LA and Detroit for that title.

-----

In order for this absurd assumption to be made would be a thread title like this:

Which cities have some houses on some streets that might resemble some houses on some other streets in some other city?

austlar1 Aug 31, 2019 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8674711)
Superficially i see a resemblance based on living in Houston and having visited Southern California half dozen or so times. Obviously the geographies and topologies are very different not too mention Houston is roughly a third the size of LA but the freeways, sprawl, multi-nodal, certain neighborhoods, reliance on cars and other factors that lend many to see the similarities.

LA and Houston both specialize in a kind of amorphous urban experience. They don't resemble each other in most respects, but the sunshine (especially in the cooler seasons of the year), sprawl, freeways, and the highly visible distant multi-nodal skylines encountered in Houston tend to remind me of Los Angeles. There is also the sense that one could lose oneself in Houston or reinvent oneself in Houston, which is something I also experience in LA. So, yes, Houston does remind me of LA. On the other hand, I rarely think about Houston when I visit LA.

Capsicum Sep 1, 2019 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quixote (Post 8673000)
I wish people would stop driving the narrative that LA's nothing but a city full of transplants from east of the Mississippi. The Latinos, Asians, Armenians, and Persians (all racial/ethnic minorities) really don't have any generational connections with the Eastern US, and they're the ones that seem to exude the most civic pride.

It's interesting that in LA, the minorities are the ones that tend to exude local "civic pride" the most and dislike the narrative that "everyone here's a transplant".

This reminds me of the situation with DC too, where black residents are most likely to feel civic pride and push back against the idea that everyone's a transplant.

"Who Says ‘No One’s From D.C.’? Not Black Washingtonians"

https://wamu.org/story/17/10/19/says...ashingtonians/

iheartthed Sep 1, 2019 3:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Quixote (Post 8674686)
Agreed. Boston's outer neighborhoods have British design/form written all over it (it is New England, after all). But that's a dead obvious parallel, which is less interesting to talk about.

The LA/London comparison is even less pronounced than LA/Detroit, yet there are still many analogies that can be made. London has a distinct multi-nodal, urban-suburban hybrid model across a vast geographic expanse*, and both cities are defined more as urban agglomerations (Greater London, Los Angeles County). Central London (not the same as Inner London) is tiny in relation to Greater London, and there's a huge discrepancy in commercial activity/intensity between the two that isn't commensurate with the drop in built-form density.

*LA County is 4,058 square miles of land, but only about 30% isn't uninhabitable or sparsely populated. So that's about 10.1 million people across 1,200 square miles, for a density of roughly 8,500. By developed world standards (minus Japan), that's a pretty high level of density to sustain over such a large area. That Greater London has a density of over 14,000 despite thousands of acres dedicated to natural preserves, golf courses, and agricultural fields is highly impressive as well.

This one is a stretch for me.

kool maudit Sep 1, 2019 3:57 PM

It's there in the sense that, what London did for establishing the archetype of a lower-density metropolitan city based on single-family homes (if terraced) built around rail, Los Angeles (and Melbourne) did with streetcars, and LA did with freeways later on.

London's development was notable for its low density as compared to Paris, and LA's to New York.

Quixote Sep 1, 2019 5:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8674993)
This one is a stretch for me.

Outer London, even with its narrow streets and tightly packed homes, still manages to feel a bit desolate, sprawly, thinned-out, and suburban-esque. It’s like a much better designed version of SF’s Sunset District, only it stretches for miles and miles. Further, a lot of these neighborhoods are oriented around commuter rail stations (as opposed to the Tube rapid transit system). On Google Street View, you hardly see any pedestrians or moving vehicles.

Of course the neighborhoods in question are “urban” by US standards and are more impressive and “walkable” than 95% of LA. Functionally however, they’re more like a hyper-dense version of traditional inner-ring commuter rail suburbs.

LA could actually morph into a more car-oriented analog of this model as long as it continues expanding its rail system and lining its arterial corridors with mixed-use mid-rises.

Docere Sep 13, 2019 6:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suburbanite (Post 8662923)
I think 8th Ave in Calgary and the 16th Street Mall in Denver are better comparisons than any of the Toronto or Chicago ones seen so far.

8th ave:

https://www.google.com/maps/@51.0456...2!8i6656?hl=en

16th street:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7451...7i13312!8i6656

Calgary/Denver and Vancouver/Seattle are much more similar than Toronto/Chicago.

Docere Sep 14, 2019 2:38 AM

Regina and Saskatoon are pretty similar.

Shawn Sep 14, 2019 10:54 AM

SignalHillHiker’s recent and excellent photo thread of Dublin just reinforces how similar Boston and Dublin can feel.

Docere Nov 7, 2019 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8671260)
Boston has no heavily Jewish city proper neighborhoods, but did it ever? Brookline is Jewish and urban in parts

Roxbury/Dorchester/Mattapan were Jewish neighborhoods in the early 20th century.


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