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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

Prahaboheme Oct 8, 2014 7:27 PM

Pendry looks like it will have great street level interaction and presence. I appreciate that they will breakup the block with the aesthetic of the historic district in mind. I really wish other parts of the city had more of a San Diego specific look and feel to them, particularly the newer developments in East Village and Banker's Hill.

nezbn22 Oct 9, 2014 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nezbn22 (Post 6759272)
I wish they had better renderings, but here's an update on the new Cohn restaurant on Harbor Island:

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/loca...278303731.html

Here's a better article with more info:

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/...loating-patio/

Leo the Dog Oct 10, 2014 5:39 PM

The Pendry Gaslamp hotel
 
More info/pics.

http://www.therobertgreencompany.com...otel-san-diego

SDfan Oct 10, 2014 11:50 PM

Good article.

Quote:

The do's and don'ts of smart growth for San Diego
By KATHERINE CONNOR, The Daily Transcript
Thursday, October 9, 2014

http://www.sddt.com/RealEstate/artic...o#.VDdzMfldVmc

With the San Diego Planning Commission considering the mixed-use One Paseo project in Kearny Mesa, and Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s commitment to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2035, the city and businesses are dealing with smart growth and density issues.What is smart growth, what benefits does it bring to a community and what can — or should — San Diego do to get more of it?

“Density is just a math problem: the number of front doors we have per acre,” said Dave Gatzke, vice president of acquisitions for Community Housing works at a recent San Diego County Taxpayers Association discussion. He said that limits on density or implementing building-height ratios can have perverse unintended consequences.

...

“We can either, with limited land and restrictions on the growth, do things like build around trolley stations, look at our first-ring suburbs and improve them and densify them,” Bruvold said.“Or we can shove off our population growth requirements and housing needs, put them in southern Riverside County, where there’s plenty of land still and where you can continue to sprawl out.”

Assuming that building a double-decker Interstate 15 and increasing the number of commuters from Riverside to San Diego — which already stands at 40,000 daily — isn’t the vision people would choose for the region, that leaves smart growth as the more palatable option. It’s worth noting that most of the 1 million additional people expected to be living in the region in 2050 will be descendants of those already here, not an influx from outside the area.

The notion of building transportation hubs and then increasing community density with housing, retail and office space isn’t always accepted by people who would be most affected.“People support the notion of a city of villages in the aggregate, but then when it comes for any specific application of it, the response is ‘This won’t solve the whole problem,’” said Andrew Keatts, land use reporter at Voice of San Diego and a former Daily Transcript reporter, who moderated the discussion.

...

Matt Adams, vice president of the Building Industry Association of San Diego, said he thinks the solution to this communication and cost-benefit problem is to emphasize the benefits for communities.“We’ve got to stop talking about the numbers and start talking about the community and the benefits that come with densification,” Adams said. “Want to have a trail along the river? Want to be able to fish along the river? Want to change the decomposed granite field to field turf or something else? Then we have to embrace change, we have to embrace densification.”

Even if this were to happen, implementation can be easier said than done, in part because of the many community planning groups a developer would have to meet for approval. Gatzke said there were seven different groups involved in the new Metro Transit System bus route, adding that if this process continues without change, “we are dead in the water.”

Elyse Lowe, former executive deputy director of Circulate San Diego who has just been named deputy director for the City of San Diego’s Development Services Department, said the issue has been solved in other parts of the country by looking at planning from a higher level.“What’s happening successfully in other states is they’re doing the planning … at the corridor level,” Lowe said. “So where we have seven different community groups, other transit projects are going though just as many cities, so in order to solve that problem they do corridor planning groups.”

...

With the demise of state redevelopment funds, Gatzke said finding funding for the subsidized units has grown increasingly tough -- an 80 percent drop from three years ago -- although several panelists said that supply and demand would dictate that increasing supply would lead to more reasonable prices as demand wanes. “You either believe the whole equation or not — that supply and demand affects price,” Adams said. “And we’re seeing it right now: Strained supply, you have growing demand you have escalating prices. So if you believe that scenario, than you have to embrace the opposite of that. We have to start to meet the supply, and prices will adjust accordingly. That’s how the free market works.”

Continuing with the economic benefits of smart growth, Gatzke said density means taxpayers save money. “From the taxpayer’s perspective, this is exactly what we want,” he said. “The home I grew up in, there were potholes, sidewalks. … That was one house paying one property tax for 60 feet of street frontage the city needed to maintain. “We’re just finishing entitlements on an almost 200-apartment project in North Park with five feet of street frontage for every apartment. So even if those apartments are a third of the value of a single-family house, that’s still eight times more tax revenue out of this smart growth development. Taxpayers have to get behind this.”

Leo the Dog Oct 12, 2014 4:12 PM

The new Rapid bus line opened today. Route 215 from Santa Fe Depot to SDSU. I could see this possibly turning into a streetcar line in the future.

http://www.sdmts.com/marketing/images/215.gif

SDfan Oct 12, 2014 7:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo the Dog (Post 6765941)
I could see this possibly turning into a streetcar line in the future.

The plan is to actually make this into LRT in a couple decades.

HurricaneHugo Oct 13, 2014 2:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDfan (Post 6766108)
The plan is to actually make this into LRT in a couple decades.

Humans will be in Mars before we get that line. :(

Leo the Dog Oct 13, 2014 2:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 6766383)
Humans will be in Mars before we get that line. :(

Some of the rapid "stations" look pretty cool. There's one in the median of Park and University.

Urbanize_It Oct 13, 2014 3:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leo the Dog (Post 6765941)
The new Rapid bus line opened today. Route 215 from Santa Fe Depot to SDSU. I could see this possibly turning into a streetcar line in the future.

http://www.sdmts.com/marketing/images/215.gif

I was in Rio De Janeiro a couple weeks ago where they have done a great job combining subway and BRT lines. Subway lines in the urban areas and BRT lines in the more suburban areas. They actually fit together and function very well as a team. I would support such an integrated system here in SD. That said, this line comes up a little short of true BRT. No prepaying options and only a small portion of the line is in a dedicated lane. Still, I can't wait to give it a try and see how she rolls!

mello Oct 13, 2014 7:31 AM

Good article in the UT about tech startups in Tijuana and the synergy going on between some companies here and there. Talk of a new tech hub forming here along the border, and it got me thinking about living in Tijuana becoming an option for more San Diegans who work Downtown or South especially those who don't have to commute five days a week.

Have you guys heard that the San Ysidro wait time has been super low the last few weeks due to new lanes finally opening? I have been periodically checking the times and it has been max 25 mins when I look. Any personal experience going down in the last month?

Here is the UT article: http://http://www.utsandiego.com/new...hion-speakers/

And one from August 1st about the same things Al Jazeera -- Wow our little cross border region getting some attention -- http://http://america.aljazeera.com/...orderzone.html

Speaking of the Southern part of metro was in downtown Chula Vista on Saturday and new apartments are springing up there. It really is a nice location good weather (basically beach weather) and the 3rd Ave. strip has decent bones all it needs is some more young money and presto.

SDCAL Oct 13, 2014 8:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Urbanize_It (Post 6766469)
I was in Rio De Janeiro a couple weeks ago where they have done a great job combining subway and BRT lines. Subway lines in the urban areas and BRT lines in the more suburban areas. They actually fit together and function very well as a team. I would support such an integrated system here in SD. That said, this line comes up a little short of true BRT. No prepaying options and only a small portion of the line is in a dedicated lane. Still, I can't wait to give it a try and see how she rolls!

Plus, this isn't a suburban area. Park Boulevard running from downtown to uptown is one of the most vital urban arteries in the city - a light rail extension from the city college station up to Balboa Park/the Zoo then into Hillcrest/North Park should have been one of the first trolley lines put in. I don't look at this as BRT connecting our urban rail system, I look at it as a glaring example of poor planning on the part of the city and them trying to use "BRT" as a band-aid fix for a route that should have had light rail service built years ago .

mello Oct 14, 2014 5:31 AM

Was just in City Heights along El Cajon walking around a bit in the 50's streets before going to a friends on 62nd and Stanley near BLVD 63 which just opened and you are right SDCAL not suburban at all. This is the most dense part of SD and will only get more so. Tons of apartments on some of those blocks packed with large families or multiple families per unit, serious poverty as well so I'm sure the car ownership rate is low compared to other areas so they need access to quality transit.

aerogt3 Oct 14, 2014 10:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDCAL (Post 6766985)
Plus, this isn't a suburban area. Park Boulevard running from downtown to uptown is one of the most vital urban arteries in the city - a light rail extension from the city college station up to Balboa Park/the Zoo then into Hillcrest/North Park should have been one of the first trolley lines put in. I don't look at this as BRT connecting our urban rail system, I look at it as a glaring example of poor planning on the part of the city and them trying to use "BRT" as a band-aid fix for a route that should have had light rail service built years ago .

How much faster or better is LRT than BRT? Because it sure costs a lot more.

dl3000 Oct 14, 2014 12:49 PM

Cost and throughput depend on the kind of BRT. Mid-city looks like much more of a band-aid than true BRT, which has a cost more comparable to LRT.

http://voiceofsandiego.org/2014/04/1...er-rapid-fire/

Urbanize_It Oct 16, 2014 10:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDCAL (Post 6766985)
Plus, this isn't a suburban area. Park Boulevard running from downtown to uptown is one of the most vital urban arteries in the city - a light rail extension from the city college station up to Balboa Park/the Zoo then into Hillcrest/North Park should have been one of the first trolley lines put in. I don't look at this as BRT connecting our urban rail system, I look at it as a glaring example of poor planning on the part of the city and them trying to use "BRT" as a band-aid fix for a route that should have had light rail service built years ago .

Absolutely SDCAL and Mello. I agree with you on both counts. The Mid-Cities neighborhoods combine to make up our densest and most urban area. I also agree that this should be the next area that the trolley is extended to (after the Mid-Coast). I was including the 215 route in the larger "BRT System" that is currently being built out. This system will largely service suburban areas using the 15 and 805. The reason why I agree with implementing a BRT line through the Mid-City area first is to build solid ridership that, I believe, will help build support for speeding up the LRT line. I also believe that the other BRT lines on the 15 and 805 should remain BRT well into the future so we can use transit funds to build out more urban LRT and streetcars downtown, uptown, mid-cities areas and to the beaches first.

SDfan Oct 16, 2014 11:52 PM

Renderings:

Broadstone Makers Quarter
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2...Broadstone.jpg

1435 Imperial Ave
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2...53Imperial.jpg

Alexan
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2...lic/Alexan.jpg

7th & A
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c2...ublic/7thA.jpg

Northparkwizard Oct 17, 2014 12:43 AM

Nice update, adios Goodwill.

SDfan Oct 17, 2014 1:27 AM

The OB Rag has written an anti-development article on Mission Valley. Please comment against their efforts to raise opposition to needed housing and mixed-use developments. PLEASE!

http://obrag.org/?p=88272#comments

SDfan Oct 17, 2014 1:44 AM

One Paseo forwarded to the City Council:

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/...owth-planning/

embora Oct 17, 2014 3:58 AM

I agree with both you both. Just to add to it, though... the Rapid Bus is quicker to build until such time that LRT were to get designed and built. And I would also be supportive of LRT along the route.

I've had the opportunity to ride the Rapid Bus, from downtown to Park & University, and it was really very quick. One advantage that my particular trip had over the trolley was that the rapid bus didn't stop at any stop between my origin and my destination because no one wanted to get on or off.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Urbanize_It (Post 6771511)
....I also agree that this should be the next area that the trolley is extended to (after the Mid-Coast)....



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