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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

mongoXZ Nov 3, 2009 2:04 PM

The skyline looks taller thanks to the fog:haha:

http://media.signonsandiego.com/img/...dfd5002d4acfe2
courtesy of the U-T

Fusey Nov 3, 2009 9:15 PM

America Plaza looks like it's pushing 900 feet. If only...

dl3000 Nov 3, 2009 9:41 PM

Even if it had the height, the skyline still plateaued. Still, height would be awesome.

HurricaneHugo Nov 4, 2009 7:32 AM

is there a higher res version of that pic?

kpexpress Nov 6, 2009 9:51 AM

what's up everyone?

bmfarley Nov 6, 2009 2:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544044)
what's up everyone?

Did you win?

Fusey Nov 6, 2009 4:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544044)
what's up everyone?

Nothing, unless you count the founder of Comic-Con dying.

sandiegodweller Nov 6, 2009 5:25 PM

Well, at least it is empty. I am sure this will help with the leasing and sales.

These retards should have stopped when the hole for the parking was finished. They would have only had a $10 million problem. Instead, they marched on through the most obvious shitstorm for downtown residential real estate and turned it into a $300 million white elephant.

World biggest tenament coming up.

Water Damages 41 Floors
By R. STICKNEY
Updated 8:45 AM PST, Fri, Nov 6, 2009

Most homeowners have dealt with a water leak from one floor to the next. Imagine that times 41.

A water leak on the 41st floor of the Vantage Pointe Apartments at 9th and A Streets downtown has caused damage throughout the building according to firefighters.

“A lot of water damage,” said Battalion Chief Randy Ballard. “Basically from the 41st floor all the way down there is water damage.”

The fire alarm system was activated Thursday at 6:30 p.m.

The leak fried the high rise tower's electrical system and the management company is required to provide personnel as fire watch until the fire system is restored Ballard said.

The tower was not occupied yet but dry wall and carpeting were in place as the building was nearing completion. The mid and low rise tower still have water service according to Ballard.

No one was injured in the incident and there's no word on what cause the sprinklers to activate.

Vantage Pointe is San Diego's largest and arguably most talked about housing projects. The condos started going up at the height of the housing boom and recently the developer refunded deposits to close to 300 buyers.

kpexpress Nov 6, 2009 5:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmfarley (Post 4544143)
Did you win?

I did! I'm having breakfast tomorrow morning with the CCAC president to get caught up on the issues. I will be attending the Nov11 meeting but cannot do much until the election has been ratified by the city council first of Dec.

Fusey Nov 6, 2009 5:49 PM

Quote:

Stadium Talk Spooks Property Owners
Uncertainty clouds chances of landing new tenants

By GENE CUBBISON
Updated 3:45 PM PST, Thu, Nov 5, 2009

The San Diego Chargers' far-flung search for a new stadium has circled back to downtown's East Village -- putting some property owners on edge as to the future of their businesses and development plans.

The owner of the historic building long known as the Wonder Bread Bakery, at 14th Avenue and L Street, was taken by surprise when word leaked last week that San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders met with Chargers President Dean Spanos about the area's feasibility for the stadium project.

"I would hope that they make a quick decision," said Bob Sinclair, who has owned the Wonder Bread building since 1998.

It's among several properties Sinclair still owns in the East Village. He first invested in the neighborhood in 1970, later acquiring title to most of area.

The remodeled, seismically retrofitted Wonder Bread building is only 20 percent leased, and as long as talk continues about a stadium going up on that parcel and others -- including the city's Tailgate Park across the street and the Metro Transit bus yard next door -- Sinclair's chances of filling the building are clouded by uncertainty.

"Tenants have a lot of choices these days," Sinclair said in a sidewalk interview outside the building. "And so they really don't want to go into property that's going to get them condemned and disrupt their lives."

Sinclair noted that he went through similar issues after plans for Petco Park and related redevelopment projects near other holdings of his were first announced and took shape.

"The nature of a project this large takes a long time to play out, and it's going to cause me some grief," Sinclair said, adding that he's willing to discuss the prospect of selling the building.

"I'm just hoping that the mayor and the Spanos family can come to a speedy resolution as to whether they're really going to work to make this site happen -- or move on," Sinclair added. "I hope they don't. I think the Chargers should stay in San Diego, and I think this is a great site."

Darren Pudgil, press secretary for Sanders, said the city also wants a speedy evaluation of the area, as do the Chargers, according to the team's special counsel, Mark Fabiani.

Fabiani said the Spanos family prefers not to have the project come about through eminent domain and court cases over condemnation prices, also saying that the Chargers are looking for willing sellers and potential business partners.

In the meantime, some of Sinclair's new tenants aren't thrilled about the situation.

"Its just a little bit of a surprise that this popped up," said Theron Williams, a principal of OfficePlanit & Olab studio, an office interior design firm that's still moving into its Wonder Bread building quarters.

"Had we known [about the stadium site speculation], we wouldn't have made the investment in the last six months," Williams said.

While Williams is rooting for the the Chargers to find a local site for a new stadium, he hopes it doesn't include the Wonder Bread building.

"Be a shame to tear it down," he said.
http://www.nbcsandiego.com/around-to...-69320477.html

I think it's funny that they ignored MTS and focused on a property owner who doesn't control much of this block.

kpexpress Nov 6, 2009 9:12 PM

How does everyone feel about putting the Charger's Stadium in the East Village?

I think it would be awesome to have all those people coming downtown for the games, but am a bit reserved about how the stadium will effect the nieghborhood when there's no event going on. Plus, football stadiums require a lot of parking area. I would hate to have a dead zone in the East Village which will make the Barrio feel even more disconnected from the grid than ever before. Also, what about the cost of moving the MTS mantienance hub?

tdavis Nov 6, 2009 9:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544876)
How does everyone feel about putting the Charger's Stadium in the East Village?

I think it would be awesome to have all those people coming downtown for the games, but am a bit reserved about how the stadium will effect the nieghborhood when there's no event going on. Plus, football stadiums require a lot of parking area. I would hate to have a dead zone in the East Village which will make the Barrio feel even more disconnected from the grid than ever before. Also, what about the cost of moving the MTS mantienance hub?

Keep in mind that a mixed use stadium as you find in many cities now (Dallas Cowboys, OKC Cox Center, etc.) can be used for many other things other than football - i.e. concerts, fairs, festivals, additional sporting events). I hear people state that the stadium would only be full about 8 Sundays per year and that is just wrong.

And regarding parking, there are ways to be creative. The American Airlines Center in downtown Dallas (Mavericks, Stars) is surrounded by mixed use parking garages. The Minneapolis Target Center is also pretty much the same. You drive right off the highway exit into the garage. It's convenient, doesn't take up massive amounts of sprawling space, and can be used for general downtown parking throughout the year.

kpexpress Nov 6, 2009 9:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdavis (Post 4544918)
Keep in mind that a mixed use stadium as you find in many cities now (Dallas Cowboys, OKC Cox Center, etc.) can be used for many other things other than football - i.e. concerts, fairs, festivals, additional sporting events). I hear people state that the stadium would only be full about 8 Sundays per year and that is just wrong.

And regarding parking, there are ways to be creative. The American Airlines Center in downtown Dallas (Mavericks, Stars) is surrounded by mixed use parking garages. The Minneapolis Target Center is also pretty much the same. You drive right off the highway exit into the garage. It's convenient, doesn't take up massive amounts of sprawling space, and can be used for general downtown parking throughout the year.

To my understanding all the stadiums you have mentioned are not football stadiums. And yes, Petco Park does a fabulous job of creating no real dead zones due to their parking (keeping in mind that the tailgate lots are not planned to stay just parking lots), and in fact Petco opens up nicely to the city and and street (J street, K street, Park blvd). If the city does happen to move forward with the downtown football stadium, I hope that its thoroughly integrated within the context (unlike the Q) allowing it to be woven in with day to day activities of the street and neighborhood.

Another couple concerns I have is the article mentioning that they want to move forward quickly with this. I know the need for a new complex is large, but with this scale of a project and considering the impact of the neighborhood I hope they think thoroughly on this and take time to give us an awesome facility (not only awesome to attend a game/concert/ect) but awesome to live nearby and to own a business. That takes a long time to make right.

My other concern is the size of the stadium. 8 downtown blocks (san diego blocks are tiny) is not a lot of room for a world class multi-sports arena. Them considering this site says to me that the city and club is being for shortsighted on their plans for a new complex. It seems as if all they want is a football stadium and that it would be great to hold other events like concert/fairs/expos/ect in there if they can. I would like to see bigger plans for SD. I would love to see a huge multi-use sports complex built to handle summer olympics, FIFA, SuperBowls, and other world wide sporting contests. I know that that's one of the main reasons SD/TJ lost their bid for 2016 (along with the airport problem).

I guess I just can't shake the idea of having an amazing stadium built on the bay with views out to the bay (and in from the bay).

dl3000 Nov 7, 2009 12:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544986)
To my understanding all the stadiums you have mentioned are not football stadiums. And yes, Petco Park does a fabulous job of creating no real dead zones due to their parking (keeping in mind that the tailgate lots are not planned to stay just parking lots), and in fact Petco opens up nicely to the city and and street (J street, K street, Park blvd). If the city does happen to move forward with the downtown football stadium, I hope that its thoroughly integrated within the context (unlike the Q) allowing it to be woven in with day to day activities of the street and neighborhood.

Another couple concerns I have is the article mentioning that they want to move forward quickly with this. I know the need for a new complex is large, but with this scale of a project and considering the impact of the neighborhood I hope they think thoroughly on this and take time to give us an awesome facility (not only awesome to attend a game/concert/ect) but awesome to live nearby and to own a business. That takes a long time to make right.

My other concern is the size of the stadium. 8 downtown blocks (san diego blocks are tiny) is not a lot of room for a world class multi-sports arena. Them considering this site says to me that the city and club is being for shortsighted on their plans for a new complex. It seems as if all they want is a football stadium and that it would be great to hold other events like concert/fairs/expos/ect in there if they can. I would like to see bigger plans for SD. I would love to see a huge multi-use sports complex built to handle summer olympics, FIFA, SuperBowls, and other world wide sporting contests. I know that that's one of the main reasons SD/TJ lost their bid for 2016 (along with the airport problem).

I guess I just can't shake the idea of having an amazing stadium built on the bay with views out to the bay (and in from the bay).

Wind patterns kept Petco from being open to the bay, I wonder how the NFL would deal with the wind. My guess is it would be a rather closed in facility or a North-South facing field to give Kaeding the best chances at making it through the uprights.

tdavis Nov 7, 2009 12:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544986)
To my understanding all the stadiums you have mentioned are not football stadiums.

No they are not, some are though, I was just using those as examples. For instance, the new Dallas Cowboys stadium is part of a huge masterplanned sporting/entertainment development (which includes the Ballpark in Arlington - Texas Rangers). It's a live, work, dine, play themed area.

I just think the days of building a "coliseum" for one purpose is over. It makes financial sense for any new stadium to serve various purposes for the stadium itself, as well as the surrounding development.

S.DviaPhilly Nov 7, 2009 6:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4544876)
How does everyone feel about putting the Charger's Stadium in the East Village?

I think it would be awesome to have all those people coming downtown for the games, but am a bit reserved about how the stadium will effect the nieghborhood when there's no event going on. Plus, football stadiums require a lot of parking area. I would hate to have a dead zone in the East Village which will make the Barrio feel even more disconnected from the grid than ever before. Also, what about the cost of moving the MTS mantienance hub?

I think the football stadium downtown is an awesome idea. I live in east village and think it would do wonders further east. There is no way that the ballpark area of east village would be this nice, if Petco was never built.

Also, San Diego will never have a Super Bowl until a new stadium is built. Hosting a Super Bowl would generate millions for the city and if the stadium is downtown think of how the harbor would play a role. All the boats and hotels down there would be packed during that time. I know hosting a Super Bowl would be like once every 7 years or so, but as said by others there are many other events that could be held there during the year.

Another attractive reason is that the trolley and the highways and parking are all available right now to support the stadium. Imagine the Chargers stadium on one side and Petco on the other side with the Ballpark Village in between...now that would be something!!!!!

kpexpress Nov 8, 2009 8:23 AM

I had a great meeting this morning with the CCAC Chairman and one other CCAC Business Owner Representative. They all seem pretty much in tune with growing a more progressive downtown. I even heard a Jane Jacobs quote. Question: Does it seem that there is a large amount of trash downtown? Like trash is always a problem when there is a large amount of people living in a certain area, but does it seem that this would be a trending topic at a CCAC lunch meeting? I didn't think so, but hey, we're all different with different perspectives.

Looks like the Chairman was interested in putting me on the Preliminary Design Review Sub-Committee, Parking and Transportation Sub-Committee and the East Village Sub-Committee. Excited to get started!

Fusey Nov 8, 2009 8:21 PM

Trash doesn't seem to be that big of an issue downtown (at least compared to other major cities I've been to). Some of the sidewalks could probably use a good scrub, though.

tdavis Nov 8, 2009 8:51 PM

I've never noticed the trash to be that big of an issue. In fact when visitors of mine come into town they comment on how clean everything is. The only concern they have is the large number of homeless individuals hanging out in the streets and public parks.

Fusey Nov 8, 2009 10:29 PM

Quote:

A critical look at San Diego’s skyline
Anti-modernist to lecture on smart urban planning

BY ROGER SHOWLEY
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2009 AT MIDNIGHT

Devotees of suburbs, skyscrapers, zoning and large cities, beware. Léon Krier is coming.

The 63-year-old, anti-modernist, European-born architect and urban planner for Britain’s Prince Charles will make his debut on the local lecture circuit Tuesday in Balboa Park.

Known for his outspoken criticism of skyscrapers, sprawl and zoning, Krier has been called the “intellectual godfather” of neotraditional design and urban planning that favor walkable communities and mixed-use development. He will be signing copies of his latest book, “The Architecture of Community.”

His presentation, “A critical discussion concerning architecture and community building,” is sponsored by the San Diego Council of Design Professionals and San Diego Architectural Foundation.

Howard Blackson, an urban planning consultant who invited Krier to San Diego, said the architect will challenge the current model of building design in San Diego — high-rises downtown and low-rises elsewhere with no transition between them.

“He’s come up with a way of designing in existing neighborhoods and communities so that it has character, what he calls the architectural ‘tuning’ of settlements, like piano tuning,” Blackson said.

Krier is best known as the master planner for Prince Charles’ new town of Poundbury, a 400-acre community of 2,400 homes and related developments near Dorchester, England.

Charles, the 60-year-old heir to the British throne, has been openly critical of modern architecture and planning principles, preferring traditional designs and concepts.

In the U.S., the Congress for the New Urbanism, which has an active chapter in San Diego, had Krier at its most recent conference in Denver, where Blackson extended the invitation to speak here.

“He asks the architectural profession to understand the value of what has gone before us,” Blackson said. “He questions the way students are being taught in (architectural) schools today to design for the future. He’s a traditional architect and urbanist, fighting the powers-that-be modernists, who are tolerant of everything except what came before them.”

Krier, who lives in Washington, D.C., and Aix-en-Provence in southern France, is teaching this semester at Yale University in Connecticut.

Blackson said Krier’s visit will start with a tour of downtown and surrounding neighborhoods before the speech; include a meeting Wednesday with San Diego city Planning Director Bill Anderson and other officials; and conclude with a presentation Thursday to the students and faculty at the NewSchool of Architecture & Design downtown.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2...iegos-skyline/


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