SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//index.php)
-   Southwest (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//forumdisplay.php?f=643)
-   -   Tempe Projects Thread (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=96153)

Upward Jun 8, 2006 6:41 AM

What's your problem, Vandercook? You're starting to make me glad you didn't join the forum until after I moved out of Phoenix.

You always claim to be joking around, but you "can't shake the devil's hand and say you're only kidding"

kevininlb Jun 8, 2006 2:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHX31
"This project is going to greatly impact my life," said Deborah Ryden, 58, who lives in a fourth-floor Orchid House loft that faces what would become the new University Square development.

"I don't think that any of us mind a new development down here. But I think most of the residents here agree we never thought we would see 30-story towers and be surrounded by high-rises," Ryden said.


...LOL "surrounded by high-rises"?!?!?! What is she smokin'? Talk about a sensationalist....

...and talk about the pot calling the kettle black. I mean, it would be one thing for a person to have concerns about building heights in the area. It would be another of the same for someone to build a house next to another house and then complain when somone built another house and blocked their views. But someone who lives in the Orchid house complaining NIMBY style? WTF? She lives in a building that undoubtably raised concerns previously, probably view blocking concerns... now she's complaining about that? I would think anyone who bought into the "urban" lifestyle by buying a loft would not care about stuff like new towers, I'd assume they would promote it. And, it's not like it's directly next door, it's going to be a ways away, certain not blocking any view besides other ASU buildings and maybe a partial view of the Butte/stadium.

Why can't we be at a meeting like this and try to talk some sense into people?

Message to Deborah: Gurl, puh-lease! :slob:

Don B. Jun 9, 2006 5:25 AM

Tempe has three new skyscrapers proposed:

1. Constellation, 17 stories (200 feet), 322 E. 6th Street (Armory site)
2. Constellation, 20 stories (225 feet), 322 E. 6th Street (Armory site)
3. Suncor Hotel, 14-stories (167 feet), Hayden Ferry Lakeside

http://www.azcentral.com/community/t...ze0608Z10.html

Condo craze just gets crazier as Constellation points to sky
6th St. proposals are 17, 20 stories


Katie Nelson
The Arizona Republic
Jun. 8, 2006 12:00 AM

Developers filed paperwork with the city for yet another high-rise condo complex for downtown Tempe this week, marking the fourth project intended to reach higher than 18 stories. The series of high-rises sprouting within Tempe's core - plus the dozens of other towers being built around Tempe Town Lake and the downtown - point to a concentrated condo craze. Constellation Property Group is the Australian-based company with offices in San Diego that submitted building proposals for 322 E. Sixth St. Right now, the lot contains only a single-story tan warehouse-style building known as the Armory, and is often empty when it's not being used for sporting event parking. Plans show Constellation intends to build 17- and 20-story condo towers at College Avenue and Veterans Way. The 364-unit complex would be at the foot of Tempe Butte, and be nearly as high as nearby Sun Devil Stadium.

The project likely would include commercial and retail space, plus four floors of underground parking with room for 750 vehicles, according to the proposals. Each building would get its own amenities such as swimming and relaxation pools, saunas and cabanas.

"We see there are design-led people who appreciate good architecture there," said Lana Wood, a spokeswoman for Constellation. "What we're bringing will be unlike anything else in the area."

Many of the planned complexes are going after the same crowd: those seeking urban surroundings. And like the others, the site is within walking distance from the planned light-rail station, Mill Avenue and Tempe Town Lake. And, as with other possible projects, the height concerns some.

"On the one hand, I have always felt that for our downtown businesses to be successful as they need to be . . . residential is a key component," Councilwoman Pam Goronkin said.

"On the other hand, height is a concern. It has been for a long time for a number of reasons, not the least of which are sightlines to the amenities which we have like A Mountain, in addition to the fact we have to balance our height so it is not all focused in one place."

The Constellation group, though, said its project will stand out.

"We want something lush and green," Wood said. "That acts as a juxtaposition with the nearby rock formation."

The project's backers include locals, too. The College Avenue Advisors business partnership originally purchased the site. That group includes local lawyer Grady Gammage Jr. College Avenue Advisors in turn paired with Constellation,which is affiliated with Australian architect Eugene Marchese. Both Constellation and Marchese are behind dozens of projects in Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, and in Las Vegas, San Diego and Austin, Texas. Marchese and Constellation also have expressed interest in redeveloping Tempe's historical Hayden Flour Mill.

Neighbors can learn more about the Armory site buildings at a neighborhood meeting tentatively scheduled for late this month, although a specific date, time and location have yet to be set. Plans for the project can be viewed at the building site. They will be on display beginning in November.


http://www.azcentral.com/community/t...el0608Z10.html

Developer of Lakeside plans to add hotel-condo

Jahna Berry
The Arizona Republic
Jun. 8, 2006 12:00 AM

Suncor Development Co. plans to add a 14-story hotel-condo project with 183 guestrooms, 40 condos and a restaurant to the cluster of blue buildings the developer is building next to Tempe Town Lake. While the developer has worked hard to keep the details under wraps, a few tidbits about Suncor's hotel project emerged when the Redevelopment Review Commission held a brief public hearing on the proposed project. In the plan, the hotel would sit just south of Suncor's recently completed Edgewater condo tower. The hotel is expected to be 167 feet tall, with basement parking, ground floor lobby and restaurant and hotel guest rooms on eight floors and condominiums on five floors.

Suncor has been reluctant to say much about the project because many would-be hotel developers make announcements that never come to fruition, said Randy Levin, vice president of design and urban infill development at Suncor. Suncor will make an announcement when the financing, the proposed hotel brand and other details are concrete, he added. If the hotel project takes off, it would become part of a flurry of construction at the 17-acre Hayden Ferry Lakeside complex near Mill Avenue and Rio Salado Parkway. Construction crews are building a 12-story office tower, a parking garage for 2,460 cars and a 12-story condo tower called Bridgeview. Eventually, the completed Hayden Ferry project would include three office towers, the hotel, and four luxury condo towers.


--don

combusean Jun 9, 2006 5:58 AM

Good lordy. All this development even after the boom. I'm glad that first wave is gone--let's see if the folks who actually stick around can put these new proposals to concrete.

Azndragon837 Jun 9, 2006 8:09 AM

Here is a related subject from the same page where Don posted the article above:

Tempe's downtown housing looking up

• Hayden Square

Some of the first housing within downtown Tempe.

Number of units: 119.

Highest point: About 50 feet, 4 stories.

Completion date: 1989.


• Orchid House

The first of the upscale condos to come to Tempe's core.

Number of units: 83 units.

Highest point: About 100 feet, 7 stories.

Completion date: 2002.


• Centerpoint Condominiums

A four-tower condo complex in the heart of downtown.

Number of units: More than 800.

Highest point: 343 feet, 30 stories.

Completion date projection: Not available.


• University Square

If approved, would be the largest of the announced condo complexes.

Number of units: About 420.

Highest point: 341 feet, 30 stories.

Completion date projection: 2009.


• Cosmopolitan

Plans to replace Gentle Strength Co-op with a Whole Foods Market.

Number units: 187 units.

Highest point: 238 feet, 18 stories.

Completion date projection: 2009.


• The Armory

The newest proposed condominium project.

Number of units: 364 units.

Highest point: 225 feet, 20 stories. (Two towers: one is 17 stories, the other 20 stories)

Completion date projection: September 2009.

http://www.azcentral.com/homepage_in...8cov-tempe.jpg


Note: Includes projects in the city's core, not those planned around Tempe Town Lake.


-Andrew

Azndragon837 Jun 10, 2006 4:06 AM

Here is a rendering of the Cosmopolitan Building to be built on the NW corner of University and Ash in Tempe. The first floor will include Tempe's first grocery store (I believe a Whole Foods) since the IGA closed years ago at University and Mill. Cosmo is currently going through the development process at Tempe, and a final decision by council will hopefully be in August. A simlar post is in the Phoenix Development Thread along with KML's other project, the KML Gateway Tower. The image is taken directly off of the KML website.

http://www.kmlsw.com/


KML Cosmopolitan (18 stories, 247 feet)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...s/477472e3.jpg

-Andrew

kevininlb Jun 10, 2006 7:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by combusean
Good lordy. All this development even after the boom. I'm glad that first wave is gone--let's see if the folks who actually stick around can put these new proposals to concrete.

I think there's enough momentum in the Phx area for many of these projects to happen. I'll just give a personal anecdote. I am moving to Phx in 2 months -- sort of wish I stuck with my original plan to move to Tempe, but either way, excited! Anyway, I was talking to my realtor yesterday -- he seems to have a good grasp on the market -- and he said he's seeing a new trend in residents moving to the area this year. The investors have mostly stopped coming in and now it's a wave of young, year-round residents, at least according to this one realtor. I hope that's the case. The one aspect of my move that I am most looking forward to is watching Phx/Tempe/etc. grow and prosper over the next few years.

oliveurban Jun 12, 2006 5:44 AM

Hayden Flour Mill moves toward rebirth
by Emilia Arnold
The Business Journal of Phoenix

History and location have made downtown Tempe's vacant Hayden Flour Mill a prime spot for development, and now the city is taking the first steps toward transforming the iconic structure.

Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman said transformation eventually could include redeveloping the mill site into some kind of restaurant and retail theme to go along with the nearby Mill Avenue shopping and entertainment hub. The silos, in particular, he said, likely could become some kind of living space, such as condominiums or a boutique hotel.

Before new development can occur, an extensive study of the site must be completed because of a state law protecting historic burial grounds. Tempe Historical Museum Curator John Akers said the land was inhabited by Indian tribes dating as far back as 1 A.D. In 2005, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community granted the city $1.5 million to study the property, which archaeologists say is a known ancient Indian burial site.

The city hired Archaeological Consulting Services of Tempe to excavate the area. ACS and the city were to hold a public meeting June 8 to give residents an overview of the project, which began last month.

During the recovery phase, archaeologists will excavate what they find at the site, which could range from ancient Indian artifacts to more recent items related to the mill's operation.

"They're looking to us to make sure we preserve anything historically significant," said ACS Principal Investigator Victoria Vargas. Development can't begin until the project is complete, and that could be well over a year, she said.

The original Hayden Flour Mill was built in 1874 by Charles Trumbull Hayden for area farmers who wanted to mill their grain crops. It burned down in 1917 and was rebuilt again in 1918. The Hayden family sold the mill to Bay State Milling in 1981, which continued to produce flour there until closing in 1998. It has sat vacant since then.

These historical aspects have made the flour mill an important landmark to the Tempe community while also posing a question -- how the site should be redeveloped?

Its proximity to Arizona State University, downtown Tempe's Mill Avenue shopping and entertainment district, and the burgeoning Tempe Town Lake area make it a prime piece of real estate.

Initial plans for redevelopment into a residential, commercial and retail space fell through in 2001 when the economy slowed, Hallman said.

"I think the parties have tussled around for the past two and a half years and realized it's not productive to let it sit undeveloped," he said.

The city had sold the property to developer MCW Holdings in 1999 for $11.4 million, but the company defaulted on its payments in July 2003 and the city bought back the property, according to the city attorney's office.

A legal battle ensued in 2004 over the city's rights to repurchase the mill. However, City Attorney Marlene Pontrelli said Tempe now is in the process of settling the lawsuit, and the parties have agreed to resolve the matter amicably.
Hallman said the city has many other issues to overcome in the development of the site, including deed restrictions associated with the land and the lack of modern infrastructure there, such as water lines and an access road.

"I guess the fundamental goal is to make sure the mill and silo buildings are used and remain useful to our community," Hallman said.

It's been more than 15 years since the first proposal for redevelopment was made, but most of the initial proposals involved tearing down the building, he said, adding that's not an option today.

"I don't think this community would abide by that notion now," he said.

wilycoyote24 Jun 12, 2006 6:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by camelback_road
The silos, in particular, he said, likely could become some kind of living space, such as condominiums or a boutique hotel.

Before new development can occur, an extensive study of the site must be completed because of a state law protecting historic burial grounds. In 2005, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community granted the city $1.5 million to study the property, which archaeologists say is a known ancient Indian burial site.

I think Stephen King has illustrated to us why this isn't such a good idea. :D

Vicelord John Jun 12, 2006 1:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wilycoyote24
I think Stephen King has illustrated to us why this isn't such a good idea. :D

amen.


and can someone please tell me what the nutty structure is on w. Rio Salado Pkwy is.

Don B. Jun 12, 2006 2:17 PM

^ I assume you are referring to the Tempe Center for the Arts?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...G_6699copy.jpg

--don

Upward Jun 12, 2006 5:39 PM

That looks horrible! That picture makes it look like it's out in the middle of nowhere.

oliveurban Jun 12, 2006 8:38 PM

That pictures is also older. Much more has been completed since. Looks a bit better.

loftlovr Jun 13, 2006 2:09 AM

http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/ind...dest=STY-67453

Tempe nears deal on historic mill
By Garin Groff, Tribune
June 10, 2006

Tempe is on the brink of settling a lawsuit with a developer over the Hayden Flour Mill’s development — paving the way for progress after years of delays and fighting over the historic site.


The proposed settlement would end a $42 million suit that MCW Holdings filed against Tempe claiming lost profits. The Tempe-based developer sued in 2004, a year after Tempe bought the property from MCW because it failed to meet a city deadline to begin work.

The deal would essentially bring Tempe and MCW to where they were in 2003, but it offers a new deadline to start work.

Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman acknowledged the deal — which the City Council will consider Thursday — doesn’t guarantee progress. But he said the draft settlement offers the best shot since the city launched mill redevelopment efforts in the 1990s.

“We’re as close to actually getting a project built as we’ve ever been,” Hallman said.

MCW will have four months to submit plans, and a year after that to get construction permits. If the developer doesn’t meet the deadline, the city will keep the property.

The settlement also would resolve a dispute the city has with another MCW development, the Orchidhouse at the Brickyard on Mill Avenue.

Key points of the deal include:

• Tempe will sell the site to MCW for $7.4 million but credit the developer $7.1 million for public amenities like parking, a trailhead for Hayden Butte and exhibits of Hohokam artifacts on the site. The city will cap its payment at $7.1 million regardless of cost overruns, which is significant given that costs have risen substantially in recent years.

• Tempe will pay $6 million over 15 years to offset preservation costs for the mill and silos.

• MCW is limited to 469,160 square feet of buildings.

• The project will include housing, offices, retail space and the potential for a hotel.

• MCW will drop its suit against the city, which will drop counterclaims against the developer.

• MCW will pay about $662,000 plus interest for city office improvements at the Orchidhouse.

The mill redevelopment would turn a barren part of downtown into a useful area and link the historic downtown to Town Lake.

Business owners, history buffs and downtown visitors also are eager to see the deteriorating mill restored. The mill was the first business in what became Tempe and was once one of the most significant enterprises in the area. An adobe mill was built in 1874 and later destroyed in a fire. The current mill dates to 1918, while the taller silos are 50 years old.

An MCW official did not return a call for comment Friday.


_________________________________________________________________
And a little article on most of your guys' favorite city Mesa!!

http://www.azcentral.com/community/m...ng0610Z11.html

oliveurban Jun 13, 2006 8:36 AM

McDuffy's may close if sale to condo developer completed
Katie Nelson
The Arizona Republic
Jun. 13, 2006

McDuffy's Sports Bar and Restaurant may soon disappear, and if it goes, it would take with it one of Tempe's claims to fame: The bar was named as one of the top five sports bars in the country by Sports Illustrated in 2005.

Owner Roger Egan confirmed Monday that he is in talks with Avenue Communities to sell the downtown Tempe property.

For locals, it would mean no more being surrounded by dozens of TVs tuned to different sports events.

And transplants would lose a favorite watering hole for watching their favorite Midwest or East Coast professional and collegiate teams.

Avenue Communities is the developer responsible for Centerpoint Condominiums, a four-tower, 30-story complex being built across the street.

Both the developer and Egan declined to comment about the potential deal until it is complete, but Egan said it could be finalized by July.

oliveurban Jun 14, 2006 9:30 AM

Tempe condo projects soaring
Katie Nelson and Jahna Berry
The Arizona Republic
Jun. 14, 2006

The 43 building projects under way in Tempe outnumber the city's 40 square miles.

It's a building boom coming primarily in the shape of condominiums, but places to employ, entertain and feed all the expected new residents are coming, too.

"There are a huge, huge number out there of people who want to live downtown Tempe, who don't have any really nice options," said Tom Tokoph, a broker who operates out of arguably Tempe's first upscale loft, Orchidhouse. "There's so few units, combined with the fact that people aren't willing to leave because, where are they going to that's as cool as this? There's no doubt this area is hot."

The Valley's overall condo market, however, is cooling.

Valley-wide, developers may be overly optimistic about how many people want to live in new high-rise and loft condos. More than 8,000 condo units are planned or under construction. Market watchers say less than a quarter of all the planned projects will actually go up and sell out anytime soon.

Like home prices, prices for new condos are starting to flatten or even dip in some areas of the Valley. Yet Tempe's condo market seems to be trying to buck the trend. The area expected to fare slightly better than other areas, including midtown Phoenix, because it has the student population and other amenities like retail and entertainment to draw buyers.

"It's our lack of supply that creates the demand that other areas don't have," Tokoph said. "You can argue five years from now, when all these buildings are in, there will be a glut."

Reaching for sky

Developers filed paperwork last week with the city for yet another high-rise condo complex for downtown Tempe. It marks the fourth project intended to reach higher than 18 stories.

The series of high-rises sprouting within Tempe's core, plus the dozens of other towers being built around Tempe Town Lake and the downtown, point to a concentrated condo craze.

Constellation Property Group is an Australian-based company that submitted building proposals for 322 E. Sixth St. Right now, the lot contains only a single-story tan warehouse-style building known as the Armory.

Plans show Constellation intends to build 17- and 20-story condo towers at College Avenue and Veterans Way. The 364-unit complex would be at the foot of Tempe Butte and be nearly as high as nearby Sun Devil Stadium.

The project likely would include commercial and retail space, plus four floors of underground parking with room for 750 vehicles, according to the proposals. Each building would get its own amenities such as swimming pools, saunas and cabanas.

"We see there are design-led people who appreciate good architecture there," said Lana Wood, a spokeswoman for Constellation. "What we're bringing will be unlike anything else in the area."

While the project may be unlike anything now in the city, there are no fewer than eight large-scale condo complexes in the works in Tempe's core. And there are dozens of others, one as large as 742 units, popping up around the outskirts of downtown and on the shores of Tempe Town Lake.

Urban experience

Many of the planned complexes in Tempe are going after the same crowd: those seeking urban surroundings. And most all the sites are within walking distance from light-rail stations, Mill Avenue and Tempe Town Lake.

Some question whether the market can really sustain all this new growth. Those doubts have growing validity as new condo complexes such as the Vale on University Drive have units still empty.

At the same time, building heights concern many others.

"On the one hand, I have always felt that for our downtown businesses to be successful as they need to be, . . . residential is a key component," Councilwoman Pam Goronkin said.

"On the other hand, height is a concern. It has been for a long time for a number of reasons, not the least of which are sightlines to the amenities which we have like 'A' Mountain (Tempe Butte), in addition to the fact we have to balance our height so it is not all focused in one place."

The Constellation group, though, said its project will stand out.

"We want something lush and green," Wood said. "That acts as a juxtaposition with the nearby rock formation."

The project's backers include veterans in urban development. The College Avenue Advisors business partnership originally purchased the site. That group includes lawyer Grady Gammage Jr.

College Avenue Advisors in turn paired with Constellation, which is affiliated with Australian architect Eugene Marchese. Both Constellation and Marchese are behind dozens of condensed living projects in Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, and in Las Vegas, San Diego and Austin, Texas.

Marchese and Constellation also have expressed interest in redeveloping Tempe's historical Hayden Flour Mill.

Stores to follow crowd

Support services for all the planned residents are being built, too. Construction on the Tempe Marketplace shopping center at the intersection of Loops 202 and 101 is under way, and retailers are coming to south Tempe, spurred by the popularity of Ikea.

Even hotels are coming at a rapid rate: several existing businesses, such as Tempe Mission Palms and the Fiesta Inn Resort, have plans to expand, and two hotels are proposed for Tempe Town Lake's shores.

Suncor Development Co. plans to add a 14-story hotel-condo project with 183 guest rooms, 40 condos and a restaurant to the cluster of blue buildings the developer is already erecting next to the lake.

While the developer has worked hard to keep the details under wraps, a few tidbits about Suncor's hotel project emerged when the Redevelopment Review Commission held a brief public hearing on the proposed project last week.

The hotel would sit just south of Suncor's recently completed Edgewater condo tower, according to the plan. And it is expected to be 167 feet tall, with basement parking, ground-floor lobby and restaurant and hotel guest rooms on eight floors and condominiums on five floors.

Suncor has been reluctant to say much about the project because many would-be developers make announcements that never come to fruition, said Randy Levin, vice president of design and urban infill development at Suncor.

If the hotel project takes off, it would become part of a flurry of construction at the 17-acre Hayden Ferry Lakeside complex near Mill Avenue and Rio Salado Parkway. Construction crews are building a 12-story office tower, a parking garage for 2,460 cars and a 12-story condo tower called Bridgeview.

Azndragon837 Jun 14, 2006 2:21 PM

^This article hits dead-on about the many proposals for condominiums, townhomes, apartments and mid-to-highrise buildings going up in Tempe.

Every week, I see proposal after proposal of residential and commercial projects...mostly new. It makes me happy that the place I work at is the epicenter of the condominium and high-rise building boom. Some projects are small, some medium sized, and a few are massive, such as the Armory, the Hayden Ferry Lakeside Hotel, and the University Square Project.

-Andrew

Azndragon837 Jun 14, 2006 6:06 PM

Beginning this month, all project submittals going to the City of Tempe will be forwarded to a brand new board, called the Development Review Commission (DRC). This commission combines the Design Review Board, the Planning and Zoning Commission, and the Redevelopment Review Commission into one lovely commission.

Yes, some meetings will be longer since a higher number of items and cases will be heard, but this gives the Planning Department a more streamlined process to go through all the cases. The DRC Meetings will be held twice a month at 7pm in the City Council Chambers in Tempe. Any vote on a case by the DRC will be forwarded to the City Council for final approval.

From the Tempe Website:

http://www.tempe.gov/tdsi/DRC/default.htm

Effective June 14, 2006, the Development Review Commission is a consolidated Commission which unifies the authorities of the Planning and Zoning Commission, the Design Review Board, and the Redevelopment Review Commission. This Commission will review development requests for the City of Tempe and provide recommendations to City Council. The new Commission is intended to create a clear and concise path for the development review process. Customers and residents will be able to clearly determine the direction for development or redevelopment requests in Tempe.

-Andrew

PHX31 Jun 27, 2006 11:44 PM

From the State Press online

Hotel, condo could appear on University
Mixed-use complex awaits Tempe approval
by Tara Brite
published on Monday, June 26, 2006
The view of downtown Tempe from ASU and its surrounding areas could soon make a drastic change.

Tempe's Redevelopment Review Commission approved two permits for construction on University Square - a 1.5 million square-foot mixed-use complex - at a meeting Tuesday, June 20.

"[University Square] is sophisticated, urban, vital and contemporary," said Tony Wall, president of 3W Companies, one of three companies involved in the project. "It's important, and it's a real place."

If constructed, University Square would be located on University Drive between Myrtle and Forest avenues.

The complex would feature a 12-story office tower, a 30-story hotel, 23 stories of residential condominiums and retail space on the ground level.

"It's true mixed used," Wall said.

The Tempe City Council must approve the permits before construction could begin on the $500 million complex.

Though development officials said University Square would bring money to Tempe's economy by attracting more people, some community members are upset about the construction and hassles it could create in the community.

Debra Ryan, a resident of Tempe's Orchid House condominiums located on Sixth Street - approximately one block from the proposed construction site - said University Square would cause many problems, including parking and traffic.

"I'm concerned about the number of cars that are going to clog our streets," she said. "I can't imagine the parking garage exit at 5 p.m."

Ryan said she would also be losing most of her view of Tempe and the University.

Businesses around the complex would also be affected by its construction, she said.

"I'm concerned about the small businesses in Tempe," she added.



I still can't believe that lady that lives in the Orchid House is complaining so much. Like her farts don't stink.

loftlovr Jun 28, 2006 8:39 AM

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e7...nterpoint2.jpg
http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e7...nterpoint1.jpg
CENTERPOINT CONSTRUCTION PHOTOS TAKEN SUNDAY NIGHT

PHX31 Jun 28, 2006 3:31 PM

cool. Still well below ground level though, huh?

Carter Jun 28, 2006 4:27 PM

I walked by McDuffy's the other day and there was a big "Closed" sign on it. I guess maybe that the sale to Avenue Communities went through.

wushu18t Jun 29, 2006 2:34 AM

edited for not thinking.

Carter Jun 29, 2006 3:41 AM

Park accross the street in that dirt lot in front of Architekton. That's where I park.

Azndragon837 Jun 29, 2006 3:50 AM

Double check that parking lot east of McDuffy's. That lot is not owned by McDuffy's, but by another company. It's still free to park there (I am referring to the lot between Hayden Square Condos and McDuffy's).

-Andrew

WHO HOO! My 900th post!

Azndragon837 Jun 29, 2006 3:52 AM

Also...Hogi Yogi/Teriyaki Stixs has been demolished. The whole property is now surrounded by a green fence. It looks like demolition is starting on the University Square Development, bounded by Myrtle, Forest, 7th Street and University Drive.

-Andrew

Carter Jul 1, 2006 6:59 AM

RIP McDuffy's

The Arizona Republic
Jun. 30, 2006 08:31 PM


What was a local landmark for sports fans of all kinds is now just to a makeshift sign with "closed" in duct tape letters and a small Styrofoam gravestone attached to the gate.

Rest in peace, McDuffy's Sports Bar and Restaurant.

The Tempe sports hangout created a name for itself with days of fans surrounded by 17 different sports on TVs while sipping on 50-cent Coronas.

Owner Roger Egan told the Republic recently that he was in talks with Scottsdale developer Avenue Communities to sell the property at 230 W. Fifth St. McDuffy's staffers have been sorting through the bar, setting aside what to sell and what to keep. The good memorabilia, assistant manager Ben Sanders said, will likely stick around.

Too bad they can't can the building's trademark funky smell. Now that would be some keepsake.

- Katie Nelson

loftlovr Jul 8, 2006 2:22 AM

http://www.lagunapacific.com/html/project.html

I was watching the news this morning and apparently this project was approved? Yee-hawwww!

oliveurban Jul 8, 2006 7:54 AM

^ Interesting. And, 3 million sq feet? Would love to see more real/ better renderings, and more specific timetable information. Great news, if so.

Slowly but surely, Tempe's investment is finally paying off in a big way.

shrek05 Jul 11, 2006 5:35 PM

Sounds promising....Kinda wanna see what their plans are for the area...guess we just gotta wait for more info

loftlovr Jul 14, 2006 7:28 AM

http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/ind...dest=STY-69536

Condos drive Tempe growth
By Garin Groff, Tribune
July 13, 2006
A surge in condo construction drove development in Tempe to a near record level last year as developers built upward to make up for a lack of vacant land.

The value of new construction was the second-highest ever for the fiscal year that ended in June. It was the fourth straight increase following a huge downturn several years ago. But last year’s 150 percent jump — driven largely by high-rise and midrise buildings around Tempe Town Lake and downtown — was the largest of the boom years.

“I don’t think two years ago we had any idea this level of activity would occur,” said Chris Salamone, the city’s community development manager.

Tempe recorded $453 million worth of development in the last fiscal year, compared with $497 million in the 1997 fiscal year, the record.

Tempe should have smashed that record last year, said Chris Anaradian said, the city’s development services director.

The developer of Centerpoint Condominiums had planned to get a permit in late June for the second of four towers in its downtown project. The plan got caught up in another agency and will come in soon, Anaradian said.

The first Centerpoint tower was valued at nearly $79 million.

It is the largest single project and part of the biggest segment, multifamily housing. That category included investments totaling roughly $200 million, or 44 percent of the overall development in the city.

Much of the boom is less exciting than the high-rises. Businesses are expanding and redeveloping, resulting in a large number of smaller projects.

The actual value of the development is far higher than the city’s figures because officials used a nationwide industry standard that calculates value based on the type of development and average costs per square foot. The value doesn’t include land, financial fees or quality of development. And because the formula is several years old, it doesn’t include a surge in material and labor costs.

The actual value of the projects is closer to $800 million, or perhaps even $1 billion, city officials said.

Real estate experts and city officials said it’s impossible to predict how long the development craze will continue, but the outlook is optimistic. This year could be strong as well, because Tempe Marketplace permits will show up in this year’s reports.

Also, few projects showed up last year along Apache Boulevard, where the Metro light-rail project is expected to trigger massive redevelopment. City officials have seen lots of real estate transactions in that area in preparation for a future development. Several large projects could come as early as this year, Salamone said.

Greg Coxon, senior managing director for CB Richard Ellis, said Tempe will probably ride the wave for a few more years. The timing is perfect for more high-rise condo projects downtown and at Tempe Town Lake, barring some significant economic shift, he said.

“There’s never been a more optimistic time — and I’ve been in the business for 20 years — than what we’re at right now,” Coxon said.

Tempe’s boom has spread beyond its city limits. Downtown and lake developments are bringing lots of new workers and residents who will want different businesses in places like south Scottsdale, Coxon said. He expects a surge of redevelopment on Scottsdale Road from the Salt River to Arizona State University’s SkySong project.

“There’s a real opportunity for the city of Scottsdale to take that corridor and totally redevelop it,” Coxon said.

PHX31 Jul 18, 2006 5:07 PM

Freight Tempe?

Andrew, have you seen anything about this project come through your offices? Apparently it is a long row of condos up against the railroad tracks that was designed by Will Bruder.

Azndragon837 Jul 18, 2006 8:41 PM

^There was a City Council review session last Thursday I believe, and 5 groups of developers/planners/architects went up in front of the council and presented their ideas and designs on the long strip of parcel from 2nd Street all the way down to almost University along the railroad tracks, between Farmer and Ash Avenue. The City Council has yet to make a decision.

-Andrew

combusean Jul 25, 2006 2:28 AM

Just noticed today there was a tower crane up right on Scottsdale Rd for the Northshore development overlooking Tempe Town Lake.

I believe this is for the Onyx development, a 22 story condo tower on a parcel originally slated for a restaraunt.

Unofficial tower crane watch for Tempe:

- Hayden Ferry Lakeside office tower phase 2
- Hayden Ferry Lakeside Bridgeview phase 1
- Onyx tower
- Centerpoint
- ASU McAllister Academic village

There are huge boom cranes for Tempe Marketplace, more for Northshore, Tempe Arts Center ... am I forgetting anything?

Either way, the short list is pretty amazing.

PHX31 Jul 25, 2006 8:04 PM

Is the Onyx Tower taking the place of Club Rio? Is that the location you are talking about?

Tempe, Scottsdale, Phoenix, and even Glendale (westgate) are basically booming. I'd imagine our metro is the most U/C in all of the Mountain West.

I really cannot wait until the light rail is finished and being used. All of these other projects (not U/C yet) that are somehow hinging on the opening of light rail could continue this boom for years to come. Tempe and Phoenix are going to benefit greatly, and us city/skyscraper geeks will be loving it.

Let us not forget the large amount of small infill in Tempe that doesn't require cranes. It's building up quite nicely.

shrek05 Jul 25, 2006 8:17 PM

^Haha, the light rail is pretty nice. Tempe along the town lake is really coming together. Does anyone know what condos they are building along the 202 near the 202/101 connection. They are large, all wood, rather ugly buildings....kinda want to see a rendering to see what they plan for it to look like in the end

I think the Tempe Center for the Arts is looking rather interesting

Don B. Jul 25, 2006 8:26 PM

^ I think that is Mondrian or Northshore - I'm not sure which.

--don

Azndragon837 Jul 25, 2006 10:14 PM

^The building that is nearly done is Mondrian. There is a tower crane up, and that is for I believe the Onyx Tower, at 245 feet, 23 stories. Northshore will be adjacent to it.

Sean, you pretty much have all the cranes down for Tempe, tower and boom cranes. I drove to work today and took the Mill Ave. route across Town Lake, and I was amazed at all the cranes dotting the skyline.

-Andrew

loftlovr Jul 26, 2006 7:41 AM

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e7...drian7-063.jpg
(from the opposite side as the rendering)
http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e7...-320Medium.jpg
Mondrian- as you requested

HooverDam Jul 26, 2006 11:27 AM

^I've been Googling and cant find a page for the Mondrian. Perhaps because its 430AM, but am I missing it? I wanted to check out floorplans/pricing.

Vicelord John Jul 26, 2006 5:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HooverDam
^I've been Googling and cant find a page for the Mondrian. Perhaps because its 430AM, but am I missing it? I wanted to check out floorplans/pricing.

I'd NEVER buy in there. 100% wood construction... that just means your upstairs neighbors are going to keep you up every tim they take a step.:(

shrek05 Jul 26, 2006 5:48 PM

haha or a bigger problem...if someone's kitchen accidentally caught on fire while cooking...the whole place would collapse

those are pretty ugly condos....complete box...interesting coloring too....

how much are they going for?

JI5 Jul 26, 2006 8:12 PM

Lay down some sand on that beach, and i'm there!!!

loftlovr Jul 27, 2006 1:45 PM

http://www.tempe.gov/lake/Developmen...nRendering.htm

http://www.grayclow.com/index.cfm/fu...rojectprofiles

They are apartments- not condos- which may be why so much wood construction... They may look better when finished... Besides- not too many exciting apartment complexes in Tempe!

phxtempe Jul 27, 2006 6:09 PM

Any Updates On The Taller Towers Around Mill Ave? Centerpoint Or The One Between Myrtle And College On University?

oliveurban Aug 4, 2006 8:57 AM

Demand for hotel rooms in Tempe brings building boom
Katie Nelson
The Arizona Republic
Aug. 4, 2006

Business travelers and tourists alike flocked to Tempe last year. As a result, hotel occupancy rates were some of the highest in the Valley.

New hotels are being proposed with just about every new downtown development, and it's prompting analysts to wonder: Can Tempe support the industry's growth?

The answer is yes, according to a study conducted by an Annapolis, Md., company and paid for by Tempe.

Yet the report also cautions that the number of rooms available in Tempe can expand only so far. The report said three hotel projects that are already rolling take up much of the space between "keeping up with demand" and "market saturation" - even though an additional nine hotels could be on the way.

Experts have continually pointed out that although the city is successful at attracting many out-of-towners through its extensive repertoire of events, it also fails to provide them places to spend the night. The result is lucrative bed tax and tourism dollars oozing into Phoenix and Scottsdale.

Nine new hotels that are proposed or are a possibility around Tempe's core could stop the bleed-out, according to the study. But even more likely to help are the three hotel projects already lined up, which include Hayden Ferry Lakeside, an expanded Tempe Mission Palms and Rio East.

Next week, Hayden Ferry Lakeside is expected to announce the hotelier that will take up residence in its posh master-planned project on the south bank of Tempe Town Lake, according to project manager Randy Levin.

The Tempe Mission Palms is planning an expansion that would increase the number of rooms by more than 60 percent, according to Chris Kenney, the hotel's director of marketing.

And the Pier 202 project that would go on the Rio East site by the eastern part of Town Lake intends to include an upscale hotel.

"The construction of these three projects will absorb 52 to 80 percent of the additional demand," the report says. "However, these projects will add to the segment of the Tempe hotel market that is currently underbuilt."

There are 47 hotels and motels in Tempe, with 5,371 rooms. The majority of those are smaller hotels and economy motels concentrated around Arizona State University. More than 80 percent of Tempe's hotel room rates are less than $150 a night, according to the study.

That proves there is ample room for upscale options, some say.

"It (high-rate hotels) means more tax dollars coming into the city," said Michael Martin, executive vice president of the Tempe Convention & Visitors Bureau. "And typically that type of rate will bring visitors with a higher disposable income."

Tempe officials will use the study to guide development as it grows, said Chris Messer, a principal planner for the city. It's the second hotel study the city has done in three years; the other was conducted in 2004.

"It's not an exact science to see what's out there and what's needed," Messer said. "Hotels are one of those difficult things to develop, so it's odd that a lot of the big projects almost always mention hotels. Apparently, (this study shows) there is a market for them, but no one has been able to put one together yet."

combusean Aug 6, 2006 10:54 AM

Mondrian approaches completion ...

http://emvis.net/~sean/gallery2/d/3279-1/mondrian.jpg

while the Onyx tower rises slowly from the ground:

http://emvis.net/~sean/gallery2/d/32...ower_crane.jpg

--

I am pleased to announce that after selling my Nikon D50 earlier this year I am the proud owner of a Canon Digital Rebel 300d, which can be upgraded to have the features of the much more expensive 10d through a third party firmware. Just have the kit lens for now but upgrades are in progress. :)

Don B. Aug 6, 2006 2:15 PM

^ Congrats.

Some tips on your photos:

What are those spots on your images? They almost look like water spots on the lens. In addition, you may need to get the sensor cleaned (Tempe Camera on University will do it for $30 on your model).

Also, you should not be using your onboard flash for architectural shots. It doesn't have nearly the reach. If you don't have a tripod, get one and use a longer exposure setting.

--don

Sekkle Aug 7, 2006 9:02 PM

Hi guys. I'm a long-time reader, first-time poster. I'm just wondering if anyone has confirmed that the tower crane shown in that picture is for the Onyx building. For some reason it doesn't seem like a very substantial crane as far as tower cranes go... I'm thinking it may be for the Northshore condos (5 stories) on the "Playa del Norte" development. http://www.tempe.gov/lake/Developmen..._del_Norte.htm

combusean Aug 7, 2006 11:14 PM

^ Tower cranes are usually assembled pretty short to begin with. As the building grows and is able to support the additional height and weight, the crane is jacked up to go ever higher.

As previous articles have mentioned, Onyx was to replace a restaraunt pad, which I am almost certain is "Lot 3" on the Playa del Norte site plan. I think the crane is too tall with too short a boom to construct the Northshore project.

EDIT:

After speaking with Nancy Ryan, Rio Salado Manager, I might actually be wrong about this one as it's possible Onyx isn't far enough in the permitting process. She said (but wasn't sure) that the crane was for a project around 8 stories which is a bit bigger than Northshore. Who knows anymore? I called a couple other people and got voicemails--I will post more information as I find out.


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:08 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.