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HurricaneHugo Jan 3, 2009 10:54 PM

wait what...a 500 footer is going up?!

bmfarley Jan 4, 2009 6:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 4005270)
wait what...a 500 footer is going up?!

Yes, that sounds about right. However, keep in mind that the economic implosion likely has scuttled these plans. I suspect it will be a parking lot very soon... and will be for an extended period of time.

As for the Goodyear site on 10th & Broadway... no plans are in the works for that site... other than razing the structure. It too will likely become a parking lot.

kpexpress Jan 5, 2009 1:07 AM

The area from 8th Ave to Park Blvd on Broadway (extending NorthSouth three blocks) has the most potential in all of downtown, When the market rebounds this place, I hope, will see an explosion of growth similar to what happened down by the ballpark. However, I fear that with all these buildings (besides the burned out goodyear) being demolished to create parking lots will have a negative effect on the businesses downtown which has the potential of furthering the economic slump. Any opinions?

staplesla Jan 5, 2009 4:12 AM

S.D. Stimulus Plan
 
Officials have list of projects to fund
By Craig Gustafson
2:00 a.m. January 4, 2009

Hoping for a piece of what could be a $1 trillion economic stimulus package for the country, local officials are already polishing their wish lists for the future Obama administration.

The San Diego Association of Governments, the region's planning agency, has compiled a list of 1,043 public-works projects for the county that would cost nearly $7.5 billion – many of which can get started as soon as the federal government opens its wallet.

That could come fairly soon. Democratic leaders have said they want to have the package awaiting Obama's signature shortly after he takes office Jan. 20.

“It would be a great shot in the arm,” said Brad Barnum, vice president of government relations for the Associated General Contractors of America's San Diego chapter.

Barnum said many local projects are in jeopardy of losing funding because of the state's budget crisis, and that an injection of federal dollars would maintain and create jobs for the region.

SANDAG estimates that the proposed projects would create nearly 96,000 jobs and generate about $5.2 billion in wages for the region.

Projects range from creating carpool lanes on Interstate 5 ($200 million), adding a new San Diego Trolley connection ($30 million) and replacing Wohlford Dam in Escondido ($30 million) to building a library in Chula Vista ($20 million) and a park in Carlsbad ($53 million).

The agency asked the county, its 18 cities and its water districts to compile lists of projects that could begin immediately, in six months or a year from now. Most have completed environmental reviews and design hurdles; they just lack money.

The region's proposal, approved last month, is a working document and will be continually growing as more projects move closer to breaking ground.

“Our idea in putting this package together was to demonstrate that we've got quite a few needs and we've got a few projects that are ready,” said Gary Gallegos, SANDAG's executive director.

Gallegos said he hopes the region's preparedness will help it acquire as much funding as possible from the feds.

“Our experience is we've always done well when we're ready to go,” he said.

Jay Goldstone, the city of San Diego's chief operating officer, said the money would be a great help to the cash-strapped city, which has a backlog of more than $1.5 billion in capital projects after years of financial turmoil.

“It would be huge on several fronts,” he said.

The well-paying jobs created by the funding also would boost local spending, which helps city finances through sales tax revenue, Goldstone said.

While the list of projects is long, some that didn't make the cut are of interest.

San Diego didn't request money for a proposed $185 million downtown library. Goldstone said the mayor's policy is that the rest of the funding for the library should come from private sources.

Mayor Jerry Sanders backed Obama's opponent, John McCain, in the November presidential election. Sanders' spokeswoman, Rachel Laing, said the Obama administration appears to be above using that against the city.

“He's never done anything to appear petty,” Laing said.

Two major questions remain about the economic stimulus package: How big will it be, and how will it be dispensed?

Some economists advising Obama have recommended spending $1 trillion over two years, while others have suggested $850 billion.

Based on past federal expenditures, Gallegos predicts that if the stimulus package is $1 trillion, California would receive about $100 billion, of which San Diego County should get roughly $10 billion.

Over the next few weeks, federal lawmakers are expected to hammer out the details on how the money will be distributed. One option is to give it away in federal grants for specific projects, a form of earmarking. Another is to give each state a lump sum to divvy up.

Local officials said they aren't worried about the exact amount of money or the form it arrives in, as long as it eventually comes.

“Even if we don't get everything we ask for . . . we now know the universe of projects, and there will probably be a debate about which ones are the best ones,” Gallegos said. “But at least we've got some of the work already done to find out what the needs are.”


http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stori...own/?uniontrib

kpexpress Jan 5, 2009 7:24 AM

No funds for the library; anyone know of any updates on the library? Last I heard they (whoever they are) were trying to put a school in the library to get funding from another source.

bmfarley Jan 5, 2009 7:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4007140)
No funds for the library; anyone know of any updates on the library? Last I heard they (whoever they are) were trying to put a school in the library to get funding from another source.

That school tie-in always looked like a desparation move... if you ask me. I don't think it'll fly! As if... as if the school district has funding available.

SDCAL Jan 6, 2009 3:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmfarley (Post 4007149)
That school tie-in always looked like a desparation move... if you ask me. I don't think it'll fly! As if... as if the school district has funding available.

The school district has tons of funding available, after a bond measure (Prop S) passed in the last election

The deal is actually doable, and the state librarian has extended the deadline of the $20 million grant to February

The hurdles needed to clear are the school board and the city council, so definately not a done deal, but it's doable

kpexpress Jan 6, 2009 6:41 AM

All the architects that I know (well atleast the ones with jobs right now) do nothing BUT schools, which makes me think that there is plenty of money for schools right now.

If they were going to put a school in the library, don't you think an elementary school would be a better fit than a high school? Are there any elementary schools downtown?

bmfarley Jan 7, 2009 2:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 4008905)
All the architects that I know (well atleast the ones with jobs right now) do nothing BUT schools, which makes me think that there is plenty of money for schools right now.

If they were going to put a school in the library, don't you think an elementary school would be a better fit than a high school? Are there any elementary schools downtown?

Unfortunately, they are doing schools and other institutional buildings because... there is nothing else left to work on! All residential and other private work has essentially taken a holiday.

And, are any more schools needed downtown? There is already a high school downtown by City College. Are any small children living downtown? I very rarely see any school age kids. It fact it seem the age you see children downtown stops at infants or children with parents ...and they are likley visiting! There is a school for under-housed children in Little Italy... they come from all over I believe.

spoonman Jan 8, 2009 3:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crackertastik (Post 3998620)
We are based in Beverly Hills at the Headquarters Complex. I grew up in San Diego which is why i frequent this thread so much.

Hilton Supply Management is a subsidiary of Hilton. We do most/all of the owned and managed hotels within our family of brands uses our services. Franchisies can opt to use a competitor, but must allow us to bid if the project is over a certain dollar amount. And we usually do well when accounting for management of the project, procurement, and Logistics.

Our new CEO Chris Nesetta immediately tried to dump us when he came on board and tried to use his old Marriott/Hyatt procurement group - Avendra but that company lacks management personnel. He decided better thankfully.

Are you guys managing to hold it together considering the economy? We are seeing a big slowdown at the moment, but after our "test" Chris Nesetta made some new requirements for ownership that should keep us afloat.

Funny, Avendra is our largest direct competitor. Most people don't seem to have a lot of nice things to say about them.

I guess we're each other's competitors though too. We pick up where management companies aren't satisfied with their flag programs.

Guest Supply has a pretty sweet deal with you guys. As far as I know, they are the only external distributors of your amenities. I know American Hotel Register would do anything to get that deal.

Right now revenue is flat, but we're gaining market share like crazy with the economy on the tank. By the time the economy recovers, we hope to have doubled in size.

staplesla Jan 9, 2009 2:47 AM

Lane Field
 
FYI - The CA Coastal Commission green-lighted Lane Field today, and construction will start in roughly 6 months.

Crackertastik Jan 9, 2009 7:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spoonman (Post 4012365)
Funny, Avendra is our largest direct competitor. Most people don't seem to have a lot of nice things to say about them.

I guess we're each other's competitors though too. We pick up where management companies aren't satisfied with their flag programs.

Guest Supply has a pretty sweet deal with you guys. As far as I know, they are the only external distributors of your amenities. I know American Hotel Register would do anything to get that deal.

Right now revenue is flat, but we're gaining market share like crazy with the economy on the tank. By the time the economy recovers, we hope to have doubled in size.

Sounds like great news. I wish you guys all the best.

We actually have a second supplier for amenities, Edward Don, that we have a similar deal with. But Guest Supply is our preferred source for most brands.

Is your company primarily procurement, or do you manage required dates and delivery schedules and install dates, logistics, and such? I believe that was our main advantage to Avendra when they went after us. We offered those services.

kpexpress Jan 9, 2009 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by staplesla (Post 4014269)
FYI - The CA Coastal Commission green-lighted Lane Field today, and construction will start in roughly 6 months.

That is great news. I think this will add some much needed attention to that part of the city.

Does anyone know if the plan includes doing anything with the Broadway Pier? I always thought that would sweet if they could develop it into a mixed-use development with housing, retail, business, artist lofts, restaurants and most importantly.....a nice marina with valet parking so peeps could arrive to the function of interest via boat. This is what I imagined SD to be like prior to ever coming here.

kpexpress Jan 9, 2009 11:41 AM

http://www3.signonsandiego.com/stori.../?zIndex=34237

"The Unified Port of San Diego Commission approved the development Jan. 8, 2008, but that decision was appealed to the state Coastal Commission by the Unite Here Local 30 union and by government watchdog Ian Trowbridge.

In November, the Coastal Commission determined that the appeal raised a “substantial issue” in light of the state's Coastal Act – meaning changes needed to be made.

The port, the developers and the Coastal Commission staff met and agreed on solutions that satisfied the state panel, including:

The developer will build and operate a 400-bed hostel to provide affordable lodging near the water. That remedy will offset the public coastal access taken away by the high-end hotels. If the plan falls through, the developer would pay a $6 million fee to the Coastal Commission.

The developer will operate a low-cost bayfront shuttle-bus system from the Lane Field development to points including the Gaslamp Quarter and the San Diego Convention Center. The service would be available June 1 through Aug. 31 for at least three years and cost riders 25 cents, Trammer said.

The shuttle will help lessen the impact of losing 580 public parking spaces now available at the site."

Providing a low-cost shuttle from Lane Field to Gaslamp, and Convention Center for a quarter!!!! Are you kidding me? WTF are these people thinking? That is why we have a trolley that services both these locations and more. This shuttle will only take business away from MTS and cause more congestion along Harbor Drive.

SDCAL Jan 9, 2009 4:12 PM

'Mystery airport' site is proposed on S.D. Bay
Private group's ideas draw mixed reaction
By Steve Schmidt (Contact) Union-Tribune Staff Writer
2:00 a.m. January 9, 2009

http://media.signonsandiego.com/img/...06b9f9b0341305

- After several years of behind-the-scenes maneuvering, a private business group believes it has landed on the ideal solution to the vexing question of where to build a new international airport – the shallow southern waters of San Diego Bay.

In patent documents filed with the federal government, the group said the multilevel project would cover three square miles between Chula Vista and Coronado, have three runways and sit partially on an island of material dredged from the bay floor.

Passengers would reach the aquatic airport via an underwater tunnel.

La Jolla lawyer Leon Campbell, part of the trust touting the idea, considers it the only viable replacement for the single-runway Lindbergh Field.

“Every other site has been eliminated,” Campbell said.

Reaction ranged yesterday from cautiously positive to incredulous.

“Can you spell 'laugh out loud?' ” said former state Sen. Steve Peace, a member of a regional committee examining Lindbergh's future. “This is crackpot stuff.”

Laura Hunter, a spokeswoman with the San Diego Environmental Health Coalition, said the site is in the heart of an environmentally sensitive region.

“For anywhere in San Diego Bay, it's a complete nonstarter, particularly in the South Bay,” Hunter said.

The Airport Trust, the group touting the idea, includes Campbell and trustee Don Rogers of Roseville, a retired architect.

In 2003, the trust announced that it had found a spot for an airport, but decided to keep the location secret while it sought to patent the bay-based concept.

The federal government issued Campbell a patent Dec. 30, opening the door to a public unveiling of what has became known as the “mystery airport.”

Members of the trust plan to discuss the idea today at a Rotary Club presentation in Point Loma and at a San Diego Association of Governments meeting, perhaps as soon as next month.

The state Coastal Commission would be among the agencies that would have to approve the project.

The proposed site is near the South San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge, which federal officials say protects many endangered and threatened migratory birds.

Campbell said the site skirts the most environmentally sensitive areas. He said the project would help the bay by improving water circulation along the shoreline.

Without disclosing the project's location, the trust has tried without success in recent years to persuade the San Diego County Regional Airport Authority and other agencies to pursue the idea.

The trust sued the authority twice as part of an attempt to gain a serious hearing, failing in court both times.

Campbell said his group hopes to make money off the concept, perhaps through a licensing or royalty agreement with the airport authority or another public agency.

Airport authority CEO Thella Bowens said that now that she knows the location, she still is not interested.

“I will not be recommending that (the authority board) pursue this in any way,” Bowens said yesterday.

Airport officials studied a possible bay site near Imperial Beach a few years ago, but decided an airport there would pose too many hazards to the environment, neighboring communities and military installations.

They say the Federal Aviation Administration will not allow north-south runways in the area – as suggested by the trust – because of wind issues.

Campbell recently discussed the concept with FAA administrators in Washington, D.C. He said they appeared to see merit in the idea and that they encouraged the trust to pursue its development.

In an e-mail sent to The San Diego Union-Tribune this week, Dennis Busch, a proponent with ties to the trust, said the FAA had “given the location its blessing.”

Agency spokesman Ian Gregor said that is incorrect.

“FAA officials are legally prohibited from endorsing any project, and we in no way endorsed or 'blessed' Mr. Campbell's proposal,” Gregor wrote yesterday in an e-mail. “Given the wide array of very substantial engineering, airspace and environmental barriers to the proposed concept, which we raised during a meeting with Mr. Campbell, it is hard to understand how anyone could conclude that the FAA 'blessed' anything.”

Port of San Diego officials were skeptical of the concept.

“On the face of it, this seems implausible – but stranger things have happened,” said Irene McCormack, a vice president at the San Diego Unified Port District.

Frederick Stutz, a geography professor at San Diego State University, said the idea has possibilities, noting that Japan and Hong Kong have built airports on man-made islands.

Stutz, who specializes in urban planning and transportation issues, said the bay is “underutilized.” He said an airport there would be easily accessible to residents.

Still, Stutz said, he prefers the authority's plan to expand Lindbergh Field.

Within weeks, a special airport committee that includes Peace and San Diego Mayor Jerry Sanders could recommend major, long-term changes at Lindbergh, including the creation of a transit hub on the airport's north side.

According to documents filed with the U.S. Patent Office, the airport proposed by the trust would:

Rise from the floor of the bay and be encircled by earthen dams consisting of bay fill. Berms around the structure would absorb wind and noise.

Handle 50 million to 75 million passengers a year and operate 24 hours a day. About 18.3 million passengers moved through Lindbergh Field in 2007.

Include three parallel runways, each 12,000 feet long. The runways would be on the structure's top deck, with parking, shops and other facilities on second and third levels below.

Include room for cruise-ship terminals and possibly an underground railroad and roads linked to the land.

Campbell said it is difficult to pin a cost on the project, given the wayward economy. In 2003, the trust estimated the project's cost at $4 billion to $6 billion.

Campbell said he understands why some might greet the idea with skepticism, given the region's tortured attempts to find a successor to Lindbergh.

“I would be a skeptic also, after all these years,” he said.

Staff writer Ronald W. Powell contributed to this report.

laguna Jan 9, 2009 5:57 PM

new airport idea
 
This plan gets the prize for absurdity, next to the train to NORCAL.
A geography professor and most on this forum will probably think it's great. After all didnt you want to kick the military out of Miramar?

Fusey Jan 9, 2009 8:46 PM

This idea is even worse than the deck over the port.

Mariobrotha Jan 10, 2009 1:45 AM

Placing the airport there is the most RETARDED idea ever. Seriously, who would give their blessing to this piece of crap? Not to mention take-offs and landings over downtown and the bridge... oh, and never mind the fact that it'll completely destroy the major regional asset that is the Bay.

Well, it's being pitched by a lawyer from La Jolla... guess I shouldn't be too surprised. What could be a lousier way for this bastard to insult the people of the South Bay than by spitting on their waterfront like this?

This just shows what's wrong with this town, even our "visionaries" miss the mark.

SDCAL Jan 10, 2009 6:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laguna (Post 4015362)
This plan gets the prize for absurdity, next to the train to NORCAL.
A geography professor and most on this forum will probably think it's great. After all didnt you want to kick the military out of Miramar?

What are you talking about? We SHOULD kick the military out because that is the most logical location for the new airport

Hopefully in the next round of base closure Mirarmar will be on the chopping block - - I think the chances are good considering they had a plane crash into an adjacent neighborhood and kill a family last year, a real tragedy :(

bmfarley Jan 10, 2009 7:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by laguna (Post 4015362)
This plan gets the prize for absurdity, next to the train to NORCAL.
A geography professor and most on this forum will probably think it's great. After all didnt you want to kick the military out of Miramar?

I think it is completely idiotic and hardly worth my time, or this sites time.


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