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-   -   SAN DIEGO | Boom Rundown, Vol. 2 (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=126473)

kpexpress Sep 26, 2008 10:05 PM

Does anyone know if the BOSA project on Kettner and Ash is supposed to be another ultra luxury tower? When are they going to realize the lucrative middle-class housing market? What happened to real housing for real people downtown? It would be awesome to see something like that on the waterfront or one of the few waterfront neighborhoods.

malsponger Sep 26, 2008 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 3824637)
Does anyone know if the BOSA project on Kettner and Ash is supposed to be another ultra luxury tower? When are they going to realize the lucrative middle-class housing market? What happened to real housing for real people downtown? It would be awesome to see something like that on the waterfront or one of the few waterfront neighborhoods.

Now it wouldn't be very BOSA like to do anything but ultra expensive/luxury would it? haha.

I'd be really surprised if this got off the ground soon. Electra is proving to be a huge failure, I can only imagine how long Bayside is gonna be empty considering Electra is still so empty. I think The Legend was the end of Bosa's streak. The markets just aren't permitting so much housing right now.

I will critique those pictures though.... I think the building looks great. I am a huge fan of the random pattern glass look. Finally a more modern urban looking building from Bosa. I am also glad to see that theyre finally "mixing use" and throwing in retail bellow. I love that part of downtown but it does lack ground floor commercial businesses.

Mariobrotha Sep 26, 2008 10:53 PM

^ Luckily the rental market in downtown is hot, and there are a lot of rental units in those ultra luxury towers that are affordable enough to allow some financial/social class diversity. So, luckily high rise living isn't limited to the super rich.

A prime example is Electra. It certainly seems to be one of the most diverse tennant wise, moreso than a complex like the Grande or Meridian, which a few of my fellow downtown agents jokingly refer to as a retirement communities.

SDCAL Sep 27, 2008 3:58 AM

I think the closer you get to the water, the more successful luxe condos are. Eventually waterfront/bayfront property in the marina area is going to run out, so I think even in rough times developers still see dollar signs in units with "bay views"

If you get away from the marina area though, you are seeing more NEEDED diversity on the middle class and even affordable housing scene

Strata will be all rentals, I hear mid-higher end, and then we have afforbale housing in the tower going up across from Vantage Point

bmfarley Sep 27, 2008 4:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by malsponger (Post 3823941)
Awesome. local.live.com has had that for a while, software based intepretation of the images to create 3d buildings. Google was relying the user 3d warehouse for all of the buildings so they were missing a ton of them. Glad to see this on Google earth now cause the functionaly and speed is much much better than local.live.

Exactly. Live waso slow I did not find it practical.... and opted for bland GE. Now GE is leagues ahead.

malsponger Sep 27, 2008 5:36 AM

I spent some time on it today and take back my analysis. Though it might be software interpreted, it's not an interpretation of the satellite images. It's incredible that the detail on all four sides of a building is visible eventhough a satellite would only permit at the most two. I think street view was incorporated in this. I believe local.live used the four angles of "bird's eye view" to derrive 3D models, so street view is my only answer to this one. Anyways, a seriously awesome job from Google on this. The reach is seems to be limited on the cities they've covered with this new system but glad to see that san diego is one of them.

Derek Sep 27, 2008 6:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sandiegodweller (Post 3823402)
County Offices, not city.


San Diego County Board of Supervisors Approves Lowe Enterprises Disposition and Development Agreement for County Operations Center and Annex Redevelopment

-- Sustainable Office Campus in Kearny Mesa Will Ultimately
Provide Approximately 900,000 Square Feet of Office Space for Key
County Services --
SAN DIEGO--(Business Wire)--
The San Diego County Board of Supervisors has approved Lowe
Enterprises' Disposition and Development Agreement for the County
Operations Center and Annex redevelopment in Kearny Mesa. The Board
also certified the project's Environmental Impact Report, setting the
stage for Lowe Enterprises to redevelop the 37-acre County Operations
Center site into a modern, efficient campus with approximately 900,000
square feet of office space, built to LEED Silver Certification
standards, along with service buildings and parking.

"We will deliver to the County state-of-the-art facilities that
will allow them to consolidate operations on their own campus," said
Mike McNerney, senior vice president, Lowe Enterprises Real Estate
Group. "Staff will have a highly professional environment that will
foster collaboration. The landscaped, open spaces connect the
buildings throughout and offer options for work breaks or casual
conferences."

The County Operations Center, located on Overland Avenue, will be
developed in two phases. Lowe Enterprises will begin work on the first
phase in the fall. One of the key components in phase one is the
development of a central plant that will provide the mechanical
systems to run the entire campus. Four 150,000-square-foot, four-story
office buildings and a 20,000 square-foot conference center and
cafeteria also are included in phase one. They will feature
sustainable design incorporating a variety of energy efficient, green
building technologies. Abundant windows will allow for natural light,
while energy efficient roofing and glazing systems will reduce heat
gain. Landscaping will feature water efficient plants and an
irrigation system to reduce water usage. Phase one also includes a
seven-level parking structure and offsite improvements to mitigate
traffic impacts.

The first step in the construction process will be the demolition
of several existing structures that are more than 40 years old.
Development of the first phase is expected to be completed over the
next four years.

The remaining phase of the development is comprised of an
additional two 150,000-square-foot, four-story office buildings,
identical to the buildings in phase one, and another parking
structure.

To assist the County in defraying its costs to build the new
campus, Lowe Enterprises and Fairfield Residential will acquire the
approximately 19.5 acre Annex site from the County.



Thanks for the info!

kpexpress Sep 27, 2008 7:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDCAL (Post 3825283)
I think the closer you get to the water, the more successful luxe condos are. Eventually waterfront/bayfront property in the marina area is going to run out, so I think even in rough times developers still see dollar signs in units with "bay views"

If you get away from the marina area though, you are seeing more NEEDED diversity on the middle class and even affordable housing scene

Strata will be all rentals, I hear mid-higher end, and then we have afforbale housing in the tower going up across from Vantage Point

Which part of the city will most likely see more middle-class category housing in the next five to ten years? Please, everyone way in.

mello Sep 27, 2008 8:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SDCAL (Post 3825283)
Strata will be all rentals, I hear mid-higher end, and then we have afforbale housing in the tower going up across from Vantage Point

What tower are you referring to? Do you have a rendering?

Kpexpress middle class housing. hmm... the problem with middle class housing in San Diego is making it pencil out with conscrtution labor costs, material costs and land costs. The prices of concrete and stell continue to go up year after year. The price per square foot of mid to high rise residential housing is atleast 250 per square foot if not on the verge of pushing 300.

So people are either going to have to live in really small units or developers are going to have to start building more rental units. Maybe that is the future no more condos but apartment units for the middle class. I would like to see mid and highrises built in Kearny Mesa, North Park, City Heights, and maybe Sherman Heights/Golden Hill.

bmfarley Sep 27, 2008 5:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 3825508)
Which part of the city will most likely see more middle-class category housing in the next five to ten years? Please, everyone way in.

Little Italy, Cortez Hill, East Village & Ballpark

Outside of downtown, I'd include Bankers Hill & Hillcrest

But for all of it, I'd consider a slightly longer time horizon.... 10-20 years, give the present conditions of the housing market and possible recovery.

kpexpress Sep 27, 2008 5:49 PM

My guess would be between 8th Ave and City College and North of Broadway. Hope this area becomes the most Manhattanized area of Downtown moving forward.

OCtoSD Sep 27, 2008 5:52 PM

Little Help
 
I tried forever to find the 3d depiction of Downtown San Diego. I found the page for NY, go figure. But not for San Diego. How does one get to that feature?

OCtoSD Sep 27, 2008 5:56 PM

LEED Certified Building
 
The first LEED certified office building in San Diego is a 12 story office building at the 805 and La Jolla Village Drive. It has silver certification. The only other Leed building I can think of is the club house of the suburban development Otay Ranch, or something like that. The first tenants, Paul Hastings ( a big LA Law firm) are taking the top two floors and are set to move in to their new space in about a month. The office building is part of the complex that there was a huge fight over that has the 40 story building in UTC. Here is a link to the Law Firm's press release on the new building.

http://www.paulhastings.com/newsdetail.aspx?newsId=514

kpexpress Sep 27, 2008 8:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OCtoSD (Post 3825988)
The first LEED certified office building in San Diego is a 12 story office building at the 805 and La Jolla Village Drive. It has silver certification. The only other Leed building I can think of is the club house of the suburban development Otay Ranch, or something like that. The first tenants, Paul Hastings ( a big LA Law firm) are taking the top two floors and are set to move in to their new space in about a month. The office building is part of the complex that there was a huge fight over that has the 40 story building in UTC. Here is a link to the Law Firm's press release on the new building.

http://www.paulhastings.com/newsdetail.aspx?newsId=514

There are plenty of LEED buildings in SD, one that I am familiar with is owned by the City of San Diego. Ridgehaven at Greenhaven is a conversion building done by Platt-Whitelaw Associates.

sandiegodweller Sep 27, 2008 8:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kpexpress (Post 3825508)
Which part of the city will most likely see more middle-class category housing in the next five to ten years? Please, everyone way in.


Vantage Pointe will be 680+ units of rentals for the forseeable future. That whole quadrant near the freeway access should be rentals.

malsponger Sep 27, 2008 9:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OCtoSD (Post 3825983)
I tried forever to find the 3d depiction of Downtown San Diego. I found the page for NY, go figure. But not for San Diego. How does one get to that feature?

Make sure you have the latest version of Google Earth the standalone application, not maps.google.com ... Then on the layers, turn on 3D buildings.

malsponger Sep 27, 2008 10:08 PM

This is definitely crazy. One of those little moments where where you realize how crazy technology is.

Google Earth
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...sponger/ge.jpg

Real Earth
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...onger/real.jpg

laguna Sep 27, 2008 10:47 PM

Affordable housing in Little Italy
 
It was mentioned that Little Italy could see middle income housing going forward. This is not in the cards due to lack of buildable land that hasn't already been tucked away by developers who won't give it up for less than a small fortune. This is due to the protected historic buildings scattered thru out Little Italy's core that must remain. The north side of Little Italy is too noisy for housing because of low overhead planes and is restricted, height wise, by being in the airports landing pattern. The Little Italy Assoc. and CCDC are on the same page that the community already has included subsidized housing and no more in currently needed. CityMark owns a piece (Pier) on Kettner and Grape that it intends to build on when the credit markets and housing stablize. It is also for sale at over $25 million. When built, it will be expensive. Their project, Aperture, on Beech and Union has sold and closed 70 of the 84 units in less than one year, in our current lousy market, at an average price of over $500/ft. This building is loft style with few premium views and no amenities and an average location within Little Italy.
Any future project in Little Italy cannot possibly be priced for the masses since they could build elsewhere much easier and cheaper.

staplesla Sep 28, 2008 4:43 AM

Navy Solicits Public's Opinion On Broadway Complex
 
SAN DIEGO -- The public is getting a chance to weigh in on a controversial proposal about an important waterfront development.

The 10news I-Team has been following the future of the Navy Broadway Project for over a year. The issues- -- does the project sit on an active earthquake fault? Is this the best use of this unique, one-of-a-kind property?

It was a done deal, until activists, news reports, and law suits prompted the navy to take another look at the way the land should be developed. This weekend, the public comment process begins.....

http://www.10news.com/news/17569108/detail.html

Derek Sep 28, 2008 8:48 AM

I mean it shouldn't really be an issue. Pick the 1000000 year old shitty white bricks with barbed wire fencing and crumbling parking lots or a nice little waterfront development. Is it the best? No. Is it better than what's there? Yes. Can we get better? Not with the way this city is run, so sometimes you just need to take what you get.


:banana:


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