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-   -   PHILADELPHIA | Lowrise/General Developments Thread (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=160247)

PhilliesPhan May 31, 2017 3:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsbrook (Post 7820151)
I think eventually. Not yet. I think neighborhoods adjacent to Cedar Park and other West Philly and South Philly neighborhoods will first. In North Philly, I see the cheaper parts of Brewerytown (they still exist) and other more Southern neighborhoods gentrifying before anything in the Badlands or that far north. If the open air drug markets in parts of the Badlands relocate, I think we'll start to see a lot more traction in North Philly.

I agree with the emboldened statement. The open-air drug markets are what is holding back development from crossing the Lehigh Viaduct into the deeper portions of Kensington, as well as parts of Fairhill north of York-Dauphin and Huntingdon. More parts of North Philly could easily be part of the revitalization the city is witnessing due to the abundance of three-story rowhome shells, but drugs are a big problem. Temple's continued climb in national rankings, as well as the North Station District project, should help North Philly out.

I also agree that Brewerytown hasn't realized its full potential yet. Once it does, the area of Strawberry Mansion bounded by Diamond, Oxford, 33rd, 29th, and Glenwood will certainly be the next slice to be revitalized.

Quote:

Originally Posted by summersm343 (Post 7820161)
Roman Catholic breaks ground on first phase of major expansion


http://www.bizjournals.com/philadelp...road-vine.html

Although I'm a Cardinal O'Hara alum, it's great to see a Catholic school in the Archdiocese expand instead of being threatened with closure. This is a welcomed change from the bleak situation Catholic schools were in when I was a junior back in 2012.

hammersklavier May 31, 2017 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhilliesPhan (Post 7820010)
I have been thinking about this question a lot lately, and I was wondering if anyone else feels the same. Does anyone believe that Nicetown-Tioga could be Philly's next hot neighborhood? Maybe not during this cycle, but possibly the next? For a few reasons, I certainly do.

1.) Nicetown-Tioga is transit-rich. With Wayne Junction, the Hunting Park and Erie (which boasts local, express, and Ridge-Spur service) stops on the BSL, and the 24/7 Route 23 (among other Night Owl routes), the neighborhood is well-connected to the city and surrounding suburbs. An express ride on the BSL is similar to a ride from East Kensington to Center City, time-wise.

2.) A brief spurt of revitalization already occurred in the mid-2000s. Before the Great Recession of 2008, some projects were undertaken near Wayne Junction. Now that the Beury Building on Broad and Erie will be rehabbed, another corner of the neighborhood will be revitalized.

3.) The real estate in that submarket seems underpriced. This even rings true for properties close to transit.

4.) Many of the homes in that neighborhood are beautiful, sturdily-built brick rowhomes. The numbered streets follow the pattern of having three-story rowhomes as typically seen in North Philly.

5.) It is accessible to all colleges and universities in the city, and almost all in the PA suburbs.

I would love to hear some opinions on this! I will be graduating from college next May, and I am taking the necessary steps to get into real estate development. With a lot of transactions occurring in the neighborhoods that investors are confident will be "next" (Norris Square, Belmont, deeper areas of Kensington, etc.), I am looking for neighborhoods that have markets that lack the high barriers of entry that more established markets have.

It would be interesting, but we haven't yet seen any ex nihilo redevelopment occur in this town. That is to say, I suspect that Nicetown will start redeveloping -- rapidly -- once Germantown redevelops.

The other problem is the BSL, which isn't as strong a redevelopment vector as the el. Some projects are -- finally -- occurring around the Fairmount station, but they're lagging behind redevelopment of the nearby neighborhoods. Nor have any major new-construction projects been executed to completion around the Spring Garden BSL stop, a fairly noticeable failure of redevelopment. I would not be surprised if this is in part because sites near BSL stops tend to be larger and therefore more expensive to develop, and often cleared to boot.

While your point that redevelopment will struggle to penetrate into Fairhill and the open-air drug markets, it has already crossed the Lehigh viaduct in Port Richmond, which quite a few rehabs, especially closer to Richmond Ave, as well as some new construction here and there. I'd augur Port Richmond is probably the city's next hot market, while development into Fairhill will lag until Old Kensington and environs fill up.

Redevelopment in West Philly moves at its own sedate pace. It still hasn't affected 52nd Street, which would've surprised 2007 me when I first started paying attention to these things. I keep hearing about renovations and people moving deeper into it, but I'm starting to suspect the dynamics in West Philly are different, and it'll pretty much all turn over in a single massive gentrificationquake once redevelopment pressures in the area reach some critical mass ... who knows when that'll be. Meanwhile, much of West Philly outside of the region between Market and Baltimore continues to decline. Which is a shame -- the 63rd Street corridor in Overbrook is a real city jewel.

Seven years ago the heroin markets reached as far south as the Berks el stop. I would suspect that during the next major development cycle they get chased to the region between the Northeast Corridor, Lehigh viaduct approach, and el since the march of redevelopment seems to be strongest along the river wards.

EastSideHBG May 31, 2017 3:13 PM

After historic paper mill shuts down, maybe a new life for Manayunk's Venice Island
Updated: MAY 30, 2017 — 7:27 PM EDT

Just last month, PaperWorks Industries Inc. shuttered operations at its PaperWorks Philadelphia Mill in Manayunk, laying off 147 employees and bringing to an end nearly two centuries of paper-making at a plant once considered the largest in the world.

Only a few weeks later, the Bala Cynwyd company is pinning its hopes on new life for the 31-acre property — to the tune of nearly $15 million.

After a quiet 30-day period of shopping it to developers and investors, PaperWorks recently put the property — located on Manayunk’s Venice Island — up for sale to the broader market, listing it at the multimillion-dollar price.

According to marketing materials prepared by SVN International Corp., a commercial real estate advisement group that has been working through its local SVN Concordis Group to market and list the property, PaperWorks is seeking a buyer who can transform the industrial tract into what SVN is calling the “Venice Island Innovation Village,” envisioned as a residential and commercial hub that could include some combination of apartments, offices, a hotel, or even a co-working space.

There is a “major opportunity to create a new ‘community place’ that appeals to multiple market segments in the Philadelphia region,” according to the marketing materials. “… Future possibilities include residential, entrepreneurial hub, office, hotel & hospitality, sports & recreation, health care & wellness, educational, park, and riverwalk.”

Offers will be taken until July 31.

http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20170530.html

jsbrook May 31, 2017 8:16 PM

I think West Philly will see significant gentrification if and when Schuylkill Yards and U City Square and similar projects are successful. People like live near where they work.

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammersklavier (Post 7820459)
It would be interesting, but we haven't yet seen any ex nihilo redevelopment occur in this town. That is to say, I suspect that Nicetown will start redeveloping -- rapidly -- once Germantown redevelops.

The other problem is the BSL, which isn't as strong a redevelopment vector as the el. Some projects are -- finally -- occurring around the Fairmount station, but they're lagging behind redevelopment of the nearby neighborhoods. Nor have any major new-construction projects been executed to completion around the Spring Garden BSL stop, a fairly noticeable failure of redevelopment. I would not be surprised if this is in part because sites near BSL stops tend to be larger and therefore more expensive to develop, and often cleared to boot.

While your point that redevelopment will struggle to penetrate into Fairhill and the open-air drug markets, it has already crossed the Lehigh viaduct in Port Richmond, which quite a few rehabs, especially closer to Richmond Ave, as well as some new construction here and there. I'd augur Port Richmond is probably the city's next hot market, while development into Fairhill will lag until Old Kensington and environs fill up.

Redevelopment in West Philly moves at its own sedate pace. It still hasn't affected 52nd Street, which would've surprised 2007 me when I first started paying attention to these things. I keep hearing about renovations and people moving deeper into it, but I'm starting to suspect the dynamics in West Philly are different, and it'll pretty much all turn over in a single massive gentrificationquake once redevelopment pressures in the area reach some critical mass ... who knows when that'll be. Meanwhile, much of West Philly outside of the region between Market and Baltimore continues to decline. Which is a shame -- the 63rd Street corridor in Overbrook is a real city jewel.

Seven years ago the heroin markets reached as far south as the Berks el stop. I would suspect that during the next major development cycle they get chased to the region between the Northeast Corridor, Lehigh viaduct approach, and el since the march of redevelopment seems to be strongest along the river wards.


summersm343 Jun 1, 2017 3:48 AM

Thrill rides coming soon to Penn's Landing

Read more here:
http://www.philly.com/philly/enterta...-20170531.html

hammersklavier Jun 1, 2017 2:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastSideHBG (Post 7820611)
After historic paper mill shuts down, maybe a new life for Manayunk's Venice Island
Updated: MAY 30, 2017 — 7:27 PM EDT

Just last month, PaperWorks Industries Inc. shuttered operations at its PaperWorks Philadelphia Mill in Manayunk, laying off 147 employees and bringing to an end nearly two centuries of paper-making at a plant once considered the largest in the world.

Only a few weeks later, the Bala Cynwyd company is pinning its hopes on new life for the 31-acre property — to the tune of nearly $15 million.

After a quiet 30-day period of shopping it to developers and investors, PaperWorks recently put the property — located on Manayunk’s Venice Island — up for sale to the broader market, listing it at the multimillion-dollar price.

According to marketing materials prepared by SVN International Corp., a commercial real estate advisement group that has been working through its local SVN Concordis Group to market and list the property, PaperWorks is seeking a buyer who can transform the industrial tract into what SVN is calling the “Venice Island Innovation Village,” envisioned as a residential and commercial hub that could include some combination of apartments, offices, a hotel, or even a co-working space.

There is a “major opportunity to create a new ‘community place’ that appeals to multiple market segments in the Philadelphia region,” according to the marketing materials. “… Future possibilities include residential, entrepreneurial hub, office, hotel & hospitality, sports & recreation, health care & wellness, educational, park, and riverwalk.”

Offers will be taken until July 31.

http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20170530.html

IIRC that paper mill was the only customer left on that little freight spur. That should mean it'll be abandoned, which means that the SRT can be extended across the bridge and down to the Pencoyd developments.

mcgrath618 Jun 1, 2017 2:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hammersklavier (Post 7821720)
IIRC that paper mill was the only customer left on that little freight spur. That should mean it'll be abandoned, which means that the SRT can be extended across the bridge and down to the Pencoyd developments.

Isn't part of that trackage owned by a tourist railroad though? I could be thinking of something else.

Nova08 Jun 1, 2017 4:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mcgrath618 (Post 7821722)
Isn't part of that trackage owned by a tourist railroad though? I could be thinking of something else.

The trackage is owned by Norfolk Southern and was leased to East Penn railroad 1-2 years ago. East Penn ran the last local a few months ago when the plant shut down.

I'd suspect that Norfolk Southern will or has already been contacted to sell the short branch.

1487 Jun 1, 2017 7:53 PM

Anyone know anything about this one on the ZBA agenda?

113 ARCH ST
Map
Appeal #:
30588
Scheduled Time:
2:00 PM
Appeal Type:
ZONING VARIANCE
Permit #:
761571[+]
Appeal Grounds:
PERMIT FOR ERECTION OF FOURTH, FIFTH AND SIXTH-FLOOR ADDITIONS UPON AN EXISTING THREE AND FOUR STORY ATTACHED BUILDING (PROPOSED MAX. HEIGHT 75 FT); WITH ROOF DECKS (FOR RESIDENTIAL PURPOSES ONLY) ON/UPON/ABOVE THE ROOFS OF: EXISTING ONE-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE SECOND-FLOOR LEVEL), EXISTING TWO STORY SECTION (AT THE THIRD-FLOOR LEVEL), EXISTING THREE-STORY SECTION (AT THE FOURTH-FLOOR LEVEL); EXISTING AND PROPOSED FOUR-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE FIFTH-FLOOR LEVEL) AND PROPOSED FIVE-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE SIXTH-STORY LEVEL); AND PENTHOUSES/PILOTHOUSE FOR ROOF DECK ACCESS AND MECHANICALMAINTENANCE NECESSITY AND THE DOCUMENTATION OF AN EXISTING PROJECTING AWNING OVER THE ARCH STREET FOOTWAY AT THE GROUND/FIRST FLOOR LEVEL ALL FOR USE AS: ACCESSORY STORAGE, MECHANICALS AND UTILITIES AT CELLAR LEVEL FOR RETAIL SALES AND VACANT COMMERCIAL SPACES ON FIRST FLOOR (AS PERMITTED IN THE CMX-3 ZONING DISTRICT AND ANY/ALL APPLICABLE OVERLAYS, EACH/ALL OF WHICH SPECIFICALLY EXCLUDE SALES OF ADULT-ORIENTED MERCHANDISE, SALES OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA AND GUN SHOP, USE REGISTRATION PERMIT REQUIRED PRIOR TO OCCUPANCY) AND ABOVE MULTI-FAMILY HOUSEHOLD LIVING SEVEN (7) DWELLING UNITS AND ACCESSORY OFF STREET INTEIOR (RESIDENTIAL PRIVATE PARKING ) SEVEN (7) PARKING SPACES (INCLUDING ONE (1) ADA SPACE, WITH ALL PARKING SPACES TO BE ACCESSED AT THE REAR SHARED DRIVEWAY . SIZE AND LOCATION AS SHOWN ON THE APPLICATION. NO SIGNS ON THIS APPLICATION. NO INCREASE TO/IN THE AREA OF THE EXISTING BUILDING.
Decision History
[+]
Court History
[+]
Primary Applicant:
DAVID ORPHANIDES, ESQ.
Capacity:
APPL

jsbrook Jun 1, 2017 11:07 PM

It will be a boutique condo by Astoban. They do very nice work. Their model is renovation of existing small buildings, generally with an addition of several floors. Often with setbacks which gives the top few floors great terrace/deck space.

http://astoban.com/current/

There is a much larger project directly adjacent as well. I forget the developer of that project.

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1487 (Post 7822125)
Anyone know anything about this one on the ZBA agenda?

113 ARCH ST
Map
Appeal #:
30588
Scheduled Time:
2:00 PM
Appeal Type:
ZONING VARIANCE
Permit #:
761571[+]
Appeal Grounds:
PERMIT FOR ERECTION OF FOURTH, FIFTH AND SIXTH-FLOOR ADDITIONS UPON AN EXISTING THREE AND FOUR STORY ATTACHED BUILDING (PROPOSED MAX. HEIGHT 75 FT); WITH ROOF DECKS (FOR RESIDENTIAL PURPOSES ONLY) ON/UPON/ABOVE THE ROOFS OF: EXISTING ONE-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE SECOND-FLOOR LEVEL), EXISTING TWO STORY SECTION (AT THE THIRD-FLOOR LEVEL), EXISTING THREE-STORY SECTION (AT THE FOURTH-FLOOR LEVEL); EXISTING AND PROPOSED FOUR-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE FIFTH-FLOOR LEVEL) AND PROPOSED FIVE-STORY SECTIONS (AT THE SIXTH-STORY LEVEL); AND PENTHOUSES/PILOTHOUSE FOR ROOF DECK ACCESS AND MECHANICALMAINTENANCE NECESSITY AND THE DOCUMENTATION OF AN EXISTING PROJECTING AWNING OVER THE ARCH STREET FOOTWAY AT THE GROUND/FIRST FLOOR LEVEL ALL FOR USE AS: ACCESSORY STORAGE, MECHANICALS AND UTILITIES AT CELLAR LEVEL FOR RETAIL SALES AND VACANT COMMERCIAL SPACES ON FIRST FLOOR (AS PERMITTED IN THE CMX-3 ZONING DISTRICT AND ANY/ALL APPLICABLE OVERLAYS, EACH/ALL OF WHICH SPECIFICALLY EXCLUDE SALES OF ADULT-ORIENTED MERCHANDISE, SALES OF DRUG PARAPHERNALIA AND GUN SHOP, USE REGISTRATION PERMIT REQUIRED PRIOR TO OCCUPANCY) AND ABOVE MULTI-FAMILY HOUSEHOLD LIVING SEVEN (7) DWELLING UNITS AND ACCESSORY OFF STREET INTEIOR (RESIDENTIAL PRIVATE PARKING ) SEVEN (7) PARKING SPACES (INCLUDING ONE (1) ADA SPACE, WITH ALL PARKING SPACES TO BE ACCESSED AT THE REAR SHARED DRIVEWAY . SIZE AND LOCATION AS SHOWN ON THE APPLICATION. NO SIGNS ON THIS APPLICATION. NO INCREASE TO/IN THE AREA OF THE EXISTING BUILDING.
Decision History
[+]
Court History
[+]
Primary Applicant:
DAVID ORPHANIDES, ESQ.
Capacity:
APPL


3rd&Brown Jun 2, 2017 2:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsbrook (Post 7820988)
I think West Philly will see significant gentrification if and when Schuylkill Yards and U City Square and similar projects are successful. People like live near where they work.

Renovated houses west of 52nd Street are trading in the neighborhood of $200k. Roughly between 52nd and 54th.

Even a year and a half ago, that was somewhat unimaginable.

Pockets of Overbrook are also rapidly appreciating. North of Market, I think Haddington and Carrol Park will remain a donut hole between Powelton and Mantua and the gentrification will come from the West (i.e. Overbrook), not from the East as per usual.

Larry King Jun 2, 2017 1:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown (Post 7822537)
Renovated houses west of 52nd Street are trading in the neighborhood of $200k. Roughly between 52nd and 54th.

Even a year and a half ago, that was somewhat unimaginable.
.

Amazing! I need to look into that. I think west Philly growth has been slower because there isn't nearly as much vacant land as pt breeze or Kensington.

1487 Jun 2, 2017 1:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown (Post 7822537)
Renovated houses west of 52nd Street are trading in the neighborhood of $200k. Roughly between 52nd and 54th.

Even a year and a half ago, that was somewhat unimaginable.

Pockets of Overbrook are also rapidly appreciating. North of Market, I think Haddington and Carrol Park will remain a donut hole between Powelton and Mantua and the gentrification will come from the West (i.e. Overbrook), not from the East as per usual.

Its very possible that some parts of philly just won't gentrify in the near or distant future. Values in Overbrook have typically been near the top for west Philly (aside from areas near UC) and they remain solid. Houses on my old block are probably worth $150k-$180k now.

One big difference between much of west Philly and North Philly is that there is far less vacancy. So while many of these areas aren't great, they are full of mostly inhabited structures. Much easier to build in North Philly where empty houses and lots are commonplace.

jsbrook Jun 2, 2017 2:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1487 (Post 7822810)
Its very possible that some parts of philly just won't gentrify in the near or distant future. Values in Overbrook have typically been near the top for west Philly (aside from areas near UC) and they remain solid. Houses on my old block are probably worth $150k-$180k now.

One big difference between much of west Philly and North Philly is that there is far less vacancy. So while many of these areas aren't great, they are full of mostly inhabited structures. Much easier to build in North Philly where empty houses and lots are commonplace.

True. The city is a big place. We're not going to see ALL of the city gentrify any time soon. And we shouldn't want to. Poor or working class people still need somewhere to live. But Philly is not in danger of losing that.

Boku Jun 2, 2017 4:33 PM

Condo project near Rittenhouse Square to involve historic rowhouse

http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20170602.html

Quote:

A development firm led by Pittsburgh-based architect Louis Astorino is planning a nine-story condo building on the 2100 block of Walnut Street near Rittenhouse Square that incorporates a historic 1869 rowhouse into its design.

The plan by Astoban Investments LLC preserves the four-story Frank Furness-designed brownstone at 2108 Walnut St., adding a five-story overbuild to the structure and incorporating a new nine-story addition to be constructed on an adjacent empty lot at 2110 Walnut St.

The 2108-2110 Walnut St. complex will encompass nine dwellings over 46,000 square feet, with 10 parking spots and commercial space on its first floor, according to a release from Cecil Baker & Partners, the project’s architect.
http://i.imgur.com/MhHF6Wf.jpg

summersm343 Jun 2, 2017 4:38 PM

More from Curbed Philly
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Boku (Post 7823041)
Condo project near Rittenhouse Square to involve historic rowhouse

http://www.philly.com/philly/busines...-20170602.html



http://i.imgur.com/MhHF6Wf.jpg

Nine condos coming to old Frank Furness brownstone in Rittenhouse Square

Quote:

An interesting project that blends architecture, adaptive reuse, and historic preservation has been underway in Rittenhouse Square since last November, and now we know that it will bring nine condos, a new nine-story building, and a glassy five-story addition to the block.

Called 2110 Walnut, the 46,000-square-foot project involves a Frank Furness-designed brownstone that dates back to 1869. It is, in fact, one of the architect’s oldest designs still standing in Philly.

The new design by Cecil Baker+Partners will bring a glassy five-story addition to the brownstone at 2108 Walnut that’s set back so as to allow light onto the street below. A new, nine-story building at 2110 Walnut is also under construction on the lot right next door and will also house a Bang & Olufson store on the ground floor.

As for the condos, two of the nine are already under contract, according to Astoban Investments. They’re a mix of two- to four-bedroom homes, some of which are penthouse bi-level units. There will be 10 parking spaces on site, too.

There’s a big price to pay for the new condos and their location. Ranging in size from 2,817 to 5,743 square feet, the units are priced between $2,352,800 and $3,306,000.

They’re expected to deliver in early 2018.
https://philly.curbed.com/2017/6/2/1...le-2110-walnut

3rd&Brown Jun 2, 2017 6:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1487 (Post 7822810)
Its very possible that some parts of philly just won't gentrify in the near or distant future. Values in Overbrook have typically been near the top for west Philly (aside from areas near UC) and they remain solid. Houses on my old block are probably worth $150k-$180k now.

One big difference between much of west Philly and North Philly is that there is far less vacancy. So while many of these areas aren't great, they are full of mostly inhabited structures. Much easier to build in North Philly where empty houses and lots are commonplace.

Define near or distant?

I remember when going past 38th Street was a no go zone.

It wasn't that long ago. And I'm not that old.

1487 Jun 2, 2017 6:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown (Post 7823212)
Define near or distant?

I remember when going past 38th Street was a no go zone.

It wasn't that long ago. And I'm not that old.

Philadelphia is too large and has too little population growth for it to be overwhelmed with gentrification. The lack of physical barriers in and around the city is also a factor. I don't see much indicating the areas of West Philly a few miles from UC are anywhere close to becoming hot spots for gentrification. I do think the trolley access from UC and Spruce Hill, Cedar Park, etc. is one factor. It's not really a hardship to commute along the trolley lines and those areas are relatively stable and more directly tied to the colleges. There seems to be much more going on along the trolley lines than along the El in West Philly.

iamrobk Jun 3, 2017 12:06 AM

Re: gentrification, I'm surprised the area between Fairmount/Francisville and NoLibs (ya know, the one that Google Maps calls Poplar but which I've never actually heard anyone call that IRL) hasn't gentrified much. Interestingly, because the NoLibs development trended north along the El (up to Fishtown, breaking into Port Richmond now), and development from Center City hasn't crossed 676, it seems like if that area gentrifies, it'll come from the west once Francisville fills out more in the next year or 2.

hammersklavier Jun 3, 2017 2:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iamrobk (Post 7823507)
Re: gentrification, I'm surprised the area between Fairmount/Francisville and NoLibs (ya know, the one that Google Maps calls Poplar but which I've never actually heard anyone call that IRL) hasn't gentrified much. Interestingly, because the NoLibs development trended north along the El (up to Fishtown, breaking into Port Richmond now), and development from Center City hasn't crossed 676, it seems like if that area gentrifies, it'll come from the west once Francisville fills out more in the next year or 2.

There's a lot of public, low-income, and lower-middle-class housing between Broad, Spring Garden, Temple, and the SEPTA tracks. The core of the area was once occupied by the Richard Allen Homes.

There's also a 1960s-era public housing barrio just north of Spring Garden behind the Poe site. It's quite ugly.


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