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-   -   AUSTIN | Transportation Updates (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=137150)

drummer Dec 18, 2020 2:56 PM

I don't have an issue with unproven technology being tested here and there, but you can't build a system entirely dependent on it if it's no proven. That's freeover's point, I think, as well. I shared the hyperloop link because I think it's neat to see the desire and obvious need for mass transit between the metro areas. I think HSR is better, but perhaps Hyperloop could do their own thing down the road for people who want to be there faster. As long as Hyperloop excitement doesn't knock out HSR, I'm fine with it. I don't care. But as it's currently unproven for the purpose of moving large numbers of people between metro areas, I'm weary of depending on it. HSR has decades of history and multiple case studies around the world showing that it actually works.

One thing I've also thought about with Hyperloop is a freight option between distribution centers, etc. Seems like a business case would be tough to build for that alone, but if something like that was incorporated in addition to passengers, it could be cool. Again - not to replace HSR.

electricron Dec 18, 2020 3:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drummer (Post 9137242)
I don't have an issue with unproven technology being tested here and there, but you can't build a system entirely dependent on it if it's no proven.
I shared the hyperloop link because I think it's neat to see the desire and obvious need for mass transit between the metro areas. I think HSR is better, but perhaps Hyperloop could do their own thing down the road for people who want to be there faster. As long as Hyperloop excitement doesn't knock out HSR, I'm fine with it.

For a system to be considered mass transit, should it not have more capacity than a bus? The Hyperloop system that NCTCOG is advocating being tested in north Texas has a vehicle/vessel capacity around 40 passengers, at most.
Meanwhile the 8 car HSR train will have a train capacity around 400 passengers, 10 times more. And, with longer platforms at the stations, the train could be twice as long with twice the capacity. 20 times more.

Is it mass transit with a capacity of just 40 passengers per train?

drummer Dec 18, 2020 3:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electricron (Post 9137274)
For a system to be considered mass transit, should it not have more capacity than a bus? The Hyperloop system that NCTCOG is advocating being tested in north Texas has a vehicle/vessel capacity around 40 passengers, at most.
Meanwhile the 8 car HSR train will have a train capacity around 400 passengers, 10 times more. And, with longer platforms at the stations, the train could be twice as long with twice the capacity. 20 times more.

Is it mass transit with a capacity of just 40 passengers per train?

Is it really only 40 for Hyperloop? I didn't realize that. I suppose the number per trip may not be as much of an issue if the trips are significantly shorter and therefore more often....so if you count passengers per day or something, etc.... either way, HSR is better, in my opinion. :)

ATX_21 Dec 18, 2020 9:49 PM

Broadmoor and McKalla station timelines
https://www.kxan.com/news/local/aust...alla-stations/
Quote:

Project Connect will take about 13 years before it’s complete, but we are already starting to see some changes now.

Approved by voters in November, the massive transit undertaking is starting to inch forward. Capital Metro is already hard at work planning and preparing for two projects that we will see sooner rather than later — the Broadmoor and McKalla stations — both serving north Austin.
Quote:

According to Capital Metro, construction will pick up on the Broadmoor station this winter with completion set for summer or fall of 2022. They are expecting to see about 240,000 boardings a year at this location, and it will replace the current Kramer station which Capital Metro says has experienced issues with parking.
Quote:

The McKalla station will feed into Austin FC’s stadium, and it’s in the design phase with an expected groundbreaking at the end of 2021

electricron Dec 19, 2020 7:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drummer (Post 9137278)
Is it really only 40 for Hyperloop? I didn't realize that. I suppose the number per trip may not be as much of an issue if the trips are significantly shorter and therefore more often....so if you count passengers per day or something, etc.... either way, HSR is better, in my opinion. :)

Actually, Virgin Hyperloop vehicle would be less, around 28 passengers max.
https://virginhyperloop.com/
https://thehill.com/changing-america...ccessful-first

FYI, that first 500 meter test run only reached speeds around 105 mph. They will need a longer test track to test higher speeds.

freerover Dec 19, 2020 6:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electricron (Post 9137983)
Actually, Virgin Hyperloop vehicle would be less, around 28 passengers max.
https://virginhyperloop.com/
https://thehill.com/changing-america...ccessful-first

FYI, that first 500 meter test run only reached speeds around 105 mph. They will need a longer test track to test higher speeds.

So it fits less than a bus. Wonderful.

LoneStarMike Dec 20, 2020 7:04 AM

Yeah, it's smaller than a bus, but if you look at the website it says:

Quote:

The passenger of the future will expect direct and on-demand transportation. With Virgin Hyperloop, there are no timetables. Several pods can depart per minute, and the system does not require stops at every station.

electricron Dec 20, 2020 2:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LoneStarMike (Post 9138619)
Yeah, it's smaller than a bus, but if you look at the website it says:

So in theory to honor on demand unscheduled service, a single person could tie up an entire 28 capacity vehicle and a slot within their tube. How does they ever expect to earn a profit?

Armybrat Dec 20, 2020 4:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electricron (Post 9138675)
So in theory to honor on demand unscheduled service, a single person could tie up an entire 28 capacity vehicle and a slot within their tube. How does they ever expect to earn a profit?

Well, like Uber does for big demand time slots, just jack up the rate for that one ride.

ahealy Dec 21, 2020 1:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by electricron (Post 9138675)
So in theory to honor on demand unscheduled service, a single person could tie up an entire 28 capacity vehicle and a slot within their tube. How does they ever expect to earn a profit?

The Concorde of the ground.

kingkirbythe.... Dec 21, 2020 6:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ahealy (Post 9139239)
The Concorde of the ground.

:haha::haha::haha::haha::haha::haha:

StoOgE Dec 21, 2020 10:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LoneStarMike (Post 9138619)
Yeah, it's smaller than a bus, but if you look at the website it says:

It will likely operate like that weird people mover in Morgantown. It lets you push a button for where you want to go and then when enough people push the same button it releases a car to go there.

If its only you it makes you wait like 5-10 minutes and will then begrudgingly let you travel.

LoneStarMike Dec 25, 2020 6:26 AM

For anyone who missed it, Christmas Eve morning on KVUE's Daybreak, Bryce Newberry did a 22-minute segment on how transportation in Austin is evolving as part of KVUE's Boomtown 2040 series.

Link

Includes stories about the airport, as well as upcoming highway/street projects.

atxsnail Dec 30, 2020 9:42 PM

There are a couple of Cap Metro filings with station locations for new metrorapid lines:

Northeast (Expo) (ftp://ftp.ci.austin.tx.us/ATD_AULCC/...MI_PLAN_01.pdf)

Southeast (Pleasant Valley) (ftp://ftp.ci.austin.tx.us/ATD_AULCC/...MI_PLAN_01.pdf)

Novacek Dec 31, 2020 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by atxsnail (Post 9145507)
There are a couple of Cap Metro filings with station locations for new metrorapid lines:

Northeast (Expo) (ftp://ftp.ci.austin.tx.us/ATD_AULCC/...MI_PLAN_01.pdf)

Southeast (Pleasant Valley) (ftp://ftp.ci.austin.tx.us/ATD_AULCC/...MI_PLAN_01.pdf)

It's interesting that each station is indicated as 90x15. I'm pretty sure that's bigger than the ones today for even the bendy bus 801. Maybe they're just making sure there's RoW clear for any future need (potentially even metrobike stations as well?)

I'm not quite sure what the different shading/crosshatching is on the stations either.

freerover Jan 7, 2021 3:48 PM

Anyone want to pick their favored corridor for the next round of high capacity transit? I know we are a long way off but this is an internet message board.

I'd love to see Lake Austin/East 7th or S. Pleasant Valley/Springdale but those might not have the needed density even in 10 years. I know S Lamar/Burnet would be popular but that seems a little redundant with Lamar/S.Congress.

Novacek Jan 7, 2021 4:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freerover (Post 9152381)
Anyone want to pick their favored corridor for the next round of high capacity transit? I know we are a long way off but this is an internet message board.

I'd love to see Lake Austin/East 7th or S. Pleasant Valley/Springdale but those might not have the needed density even in 10 years. I know S Lamar/Burnet would be popular but that seems a little redundant with Lamar/S.Congress.

When ProjectConnect was doing the planning, the first "vision" map had the potential of a spur of the orange line to the North Burnet Gateway/Domain area. That continues to be my vote. It's definitely far enough away from North Lamar (>2 miles) to serve a different population.

By the time we're even considering that (after the first round of project connect and after the rest of Lamar/SoCo) that area could have more people living there than downtown.

chinchaaa Jan 7, 2021 4:13 PM

South Lamar is a great next corridor.

atxsnail Jan 7, 2021 4:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by freerover (Post 9152381)
Anyone want to pick their favored corridor for the next round of high capacity transit? I know we are a long way off but this is an internet message board.

I'd love to see Lake Austin/East 7th or S. Pleasant Valley/Springdale but those might not have the needed density even in 10 years. I know S Lamar/Burnet would be popular but that seems a little redundant with Lamar/S.Congress.

Dunno, it seems pretty much like the density on W5/6 & E7 is already there to support BRT. I found the NACTO target density numbers but couldn't figure out what the measurement statistic actually means in order to compare to the east side.

Most of the activity is to the south of where the line would go, but I wouldn't mind if that was the next corridor up. Anything west of MoPac seems like a waste of money until some of those UT/Muni tracts change but I wouldn't complain if Deep Eddy or even Mozarts got connected to the rest of the civilized world.

drummer Jan 7, 2021 4:34 PM

I think North Burnet up to the Domain area and South Lamar.

I do like the idea of an East/West line a la 5th/6th/7th, but I agree that it would need to be west of Mopac. I'm unsure of how far east of 35 would be needed.


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