SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Downtown & City of Portland (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=192)
-   -   Albina Vision / Rose Quarter Redevelopment (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=152548)

maccoinnich Jun 14, 2016 4:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2oh1 (Post 7473614)
There's no need to be rude. You're better than that. ou're obviously passionate about the MC, but you keep nitpicking details while ignoring the main points of the comments you're replying to. For example...

When you accuse me of manipulating data for the purpose of making my point, I don't think it's nitpicking to point out that, no, I didn't in fact do that.

babs Jun 14, 2016 4:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 58rhodes (Post 7473830)
You answered your own question. If you believe it to be gorgeous why on earth would you want to tear it down? The notion that fiscal responsibility is somehow the end-all-be-all here is just maddening. Of course saving/rehabilitating this building is the best use of the millions that would be required. What type of cost-efficient mundanity do you imagine would replace it? We have far too few examples of great architecture in this city, and I for one would pay to keep it around for that reason alone.

my thoughts too--if any body cares:cheers:[/QUOTE]

Wouldn't it be great to save the structure and repurpose it into something else? That's my issue here. It's life as a financially successful arena is over, and has been for over 20 years. If you rip out the internal arena, you could do something else with it. That's my frustration with the save the VMC crowd. They seem stuck on the "it can't be anything but an arena" mantra.

Look what Memphis did with their old arena:
www.basspro.com/pyramid

Not saying that it should turn in a Bass Pro Shop but I like the thought of doing something where it turns into something useful and the taxpayers aren't spending $150 million to turn it into an unneeded arena.

eric cantona Jun 14, 2016 6:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babs (Post 7473882)
my thoughts too--if any body cares:cheers:

"unneeded arena"

unneeded according to you.

I agree with the preservationists here. the report (by professionals!) tells me that IN ADDITION to preserving an historically important piece of architecture (shell AND bowl), it can be a useful part of our urban fabric and contribute financially to its continued existence. for me that's a win-win-win.

legacy projects, like many (most?) civic projects, traditionally do not pay for themselves. at least not monetarily. they do contribute a great deal to the soul of the City, and provide touchstones to our collective past. putting this in strictly monetized terms misses the point of it completely, in my view.

maccoinnich Jun 14, 2016 7:24 PM

And for those of you concerned about money, it's worth noting that any renovation that changes the use of the building will cost more than a renovation that maintains its use as an arena.

urbanlife Jun 14, 2016 8:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maccoinnich (Post 7474107)
And for those of you concerned about money, it's worth noting that any renovation that changes the use of the building will cost more than a renovation that maintains its use as an arena.

I think there is still a lot of use for it as an arena, though some upgrades to the facility would be nice. I like having it be the home to the Winterhawks, I always prefer watching them in a smaller arena than over at the Moda Center.

babs Jun 14, 2016 10:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maccoinnich (Post 7474107)
And for those of you concerned about money, it's worth noting that any renovation that changes the use of the building will cost more than a renovation that maintains its use as an arena.

Yet spending more to turn it into something else could have a return significantly higher.

babs Jun 14, 2016 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eric cantona (Post 7474066)
"unneeded arena"

unneeded according to you.

I agree with the preservationists here. the report (by professionals!) tells me that IN ADDITION to preserving an historically important piece of architecture (shell AND bowl), it can be a useful part of our urban fabric and contribute financially to its continued existence. for me that's a win-win-win.

legacy projects, like many (most?) civic projects, traditionally do not pay for themselves. at least not monetarily. they do contribute a great deal to the soul of the City, and provide touchstones to our collective past. putting this in strictly monetized terms misses the point of it completely, in my view.

It's an under used tombstone. I don't know why some of you are so resistant to looking at other uses for the building. In know many of you are creative people, the lack of creativity in finding new uses for this building is amazing. And I'm not even calling for demolition like so many others.

58rhodes Jun 14, 2016 11:47 PM

150 events per year--more than I thought

how many events does the average NFL stadium host a year?

65MAX Jun 15, 2016 1:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babs (Post 7474309)
It's an under used tombstone. I don't know why some of you are so resistant to looking at other uses for the building. In know many of you are creative people, the lack of creativity in finding new uses for this building is amazing. And I'm not even calling for demolition like so many others.

I don't think anybody objects to finding other uses for the VMC. There's no lack of options for creative reuse of the Coliseum. I've given multiple ideas of ways the building could be used other than as an arena. But there are higher costs incurred when converting it to other uses than there are keeping it as an arena. So the ROI would be a little riskier, and we all know how risk-averse the City is.

PacificNW Jun 15, 2016 1:57 AM

Portland is one of the major creative hubs of sneaker/outdoor gear companies in the U.S. Wouldn't it be great to have the likes of Nike, Addias, Columbia Sportwear, etc. step up and collaborate with some grand idea(s) for this venue? Come on, Mr. Knight, show Portland some more love..

innovativethinking Jun 15, 2016 6:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PacificNW (Post 7474532)
Portland is one of the major creative hubs of sneaker/outdoor gear companies in the U.S. Wouldn't it be great to have the likes of Nike, Addias, Columbia Sportwear, etc. step up and collaborate with some grand idea(s) for this venue? Come on, Mr. Knight, show Portland some more love..

That's actually not a bad idea. Or Nike just bankroll the whole thing on their own and make it a grand Nike museum of their history. It can become a tourist draw for Nike. Mercedes for example in Stuttgart has a similar concept..

BlazerBeav Jun 15, 2016 3:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by innovativethinking (Post 7474695)
That's actually not a bad idea. Or Nike just bankroll the whole thing on their own and make it a grand Nike museum of their history. It can become a tourist draw for Nike. Mercedes for example in Stuttgart has a similar concept..

Jumptown was part of the redevelopment proposal years ago that would have built something along the lines of Kansas City's Power & Light district.

2oh1 Jun 16, 2016 7:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by babs (Post 7474305)
Yet spending more to turn it into something else could have a return significantly higher.

THIS.

Again, I ask, do we need it? Is it the best use of the land? Is it the best way to encourage growth for the inner east side? Is it the best option for Portland in the decades to come? How much will it cost and would that money be more effectively used elsewhere?

Quote:

Originally Posted by BlazerBeav (Post 7474980)
Jumptown was part of the redevelopment proposal years ago that would have built something along the lines of Kansas City's Power & Light district.

Yeah, I remember the renderings that went with Jumptown. Stunning. And probably entirely unrealistic (sadly).

I think it's funny how the same people who want to fight for this structure haven't blinked an eye at the fact that one of the proposals permanently eliminates the glass from "The Glass Palace." I think people are romanticizing the idea of it rather than the reality of it. Are people really, REALLY, fighting to save a sea of parking? Are people really passionate about saving a ghost town in such an amazing location? That's what the MC is. It's a sea of parking and a ghost town whenever events aren't in progress.

If a billionaire came along and decided to fund a massive underground parking structure beneath the MC, and maybe 20 stories of housing or a hotel above it, I'd be thrilled. But as a stand alone structure at that location, surrounded by a sea of asphalt with a much more modern arena next door and countless other venues around town which could fill the need... c'mon now.

58rhodes Jun 17, 2016 4:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2oh1 (Post 7476006)
THIS.

Again, I ask, do we need it? Is it the best use of the land? Is it the best way to encourage growth for the inner east side? Is it the best option for Portland in the decades to come? How much will it cost and would that money be more effectively used elsewhere?



Yeah, I remember the renderings that went with Jumptown. Stunning. And probably entirely unrealistic (sadly).

I think it's funny how the same people who want to fight for this structure haven't blinked an eye at the fact that one of the proposals permanently eliminates the glass from "The Glass Palace." I think people are romanticizing the idea of it rather than the reality of it. Are people really, REALLY, fighting to save a sea of parking? Are people really passionate about saving a ghost town in such an amazing location? That's what the MC is. It's a sea of parking and a ghost town whenever events aren't in progress.

If a billionaire came along and decided to fund a massive underground parking structure beneath the MC, and maybe 20 stories of housing or a hotel above it, I'd be thrilled. But as a stand alone structure at that location, surrounded by a sea of asphalt with a much more modern arena next door and countless other venues around town which could fill the need... c'mon now.

seriously--? theres a bunch of blank canvass over there that just sits

cailes Jun 17, 2016 4:39 AM

If we are talking about the real history of this area, wouldn't mowing down MC make more sense and turning that area back into residential?

maccoinnich Jun 18, 2016 7:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2oh1 (Post 7476006)
I think it's funny how the same people who want to fight for this structure haven't blinked an eye at the fact that one of the proposals permanently eliminates the glass from "The Glass Palace." I think people are romanticizing the idea of it rather than the reality of it. Are people really, REALLY, fighting to save a sea of parking? Are people really passionate about saving a ghost town in such an amazing location? That's what the MC is. It's a sea of parking and a ghost town whenever events aren't in progress.

Literally no one is fighting to save the sea of parking.

Also, no one (either posting in this thread, or that I've met in real life) supports the Open Air Arena option that would remove all the glass.

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2oh1 (Post 7476006)
If a billionaire came along and decided to fund a massive underground parking structure beneath the MC, and maybe 20 stories of housing or a hotel above it, I'd be thrilled. But as a stand alone structure at that location, surrounded by a sea of asphalt with a much more modern arena next door and countless other venues around town which could fill the need... c'mon now.

We've covered this. There aren't "countless" other venues around town with the same capacity.

58rhodes Jun 19, 2016 12:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cailes (Post 7477315)
If we are talking about the real history of this area, wouldn't mowing down MC make more sense and turning that area back into residential?

maybe but whos interested?

maccoinnich Jun 30, 2016 7:52 PM

Quote:

Will National Treasure Designation Save Portland’s Modernist Arena?

https://nextcity.org/images/made/Por...800_529_80.jpg

Earlier this month, the nonprofit National Trust for Historic Preservation named Portland’s Veterans Memorial Coliseum a National Treasure, a designation both local officials and supporters of the modernist arena hope will lead to a decision about the building’s future. Financed by an $8 million voter-approved bond and completed in 1960, the arena has suffered from deferred maintenance ever since.

Demolition has been threatened and avoided before, and in 2015 the Oregon city undertook an options study for the site. But the biggest threat to the arena’s future is the building itself: Its amenities are out of date, particularly compared to the new Moda Center next door, and a lack of ongoing care has imperiled even the signature design features that make it architecturally compelling. With the new designation, the National Trust will work with stakeholders to come up with a financially viable plan to keep the coliseum standing, one that will almost certainly include asking the taxpayers to open their wallets again.

...continues at Next City.

360Rich Jul 29, 2016 12:38 AM

New Video Replay Screens To Be Installed at VMC
 
New Video Replay Screens To Be Installed at VMC

http://whl.uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/...ed-730x556.jpg

The Portland Winterhawks, in conjunction with the City of Portland and Portland Arena Management (PAM), are excited to announce that new video replay screens are being installed in Veterans Memorial Coliseum in time for the upcoming 2016-17 season.

http://winterhawks.com/article/new-v...stalled-at-vmc

PacificNW Nov 1, 2016 8:59 PM

http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/i...ml#incart_2box

Developers quietly pitch new vision for Veterans Memorial Coliseum


All times are GMT. The time now is 5:23 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.